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50 games for the free OS available right NOW!

A while ago, [url=http://www.gog.com/news/gogcom_soon_on_more_platforms]we've announced our plans to add Linux support as one of the features of our digital platform, with 100 games on the launch day sometime this fall. We've put much time and effort into this project and now we've found ourselves with over 50 titles, classic and new, prepared for distribution, site infrastructure ready, support team trained and standing by, and absolutely no reason to wait until October or November. We're still aiming to have at least 100 Linux games in the coming months, but we've decided not to delay the launch just for the sake of having a nice-looking number to show off to the press. It's not about them, after all, it's about you. So, one of the most popular site feature requests on our community wishlist is granted today: Linux support has officially arrived on GOG.com!

The first 50+ titles we've have in store for you come from all the corners of our DRM-Free catalog. Note that we've got many classic titles coming officially to Linux for the very first time, thanks to the custom builds prepared by our dedicated team of penguin tamers. That's over twenty fan-favorite GOG.com classics, like &[url=http://www.gog.com/game/flatout_2]Flatout 2, , <a href="http://www.gog.com/game/darklands">Darklands, or Realms of the Haunting we've personally ushered one by one into the welcoming embrace of Linux gamers. That's already quite a nice chunk of our back-catalog, and you can expect more from our dedicated Linux team soon!

Now, for the recent titles. We've got some indie games with native Linux versions that finally find their well-deserved spot in our store. Among them, debuting on Linux, - a well received original comedic Sci-Fi puzzler. On top of that, be on the lookout for two new additions to the GOG.com catalog: [url=http://www.gog.com/game/gods_will_be_watching]Gods Will Be Watching (coming in a couple of hours) and Unrest:Special Edition (Linux build coming right up!), both of them very fresh and intriguing. This is the very first time we can provide you with all the PC versions of a premiere game, and we will continue to do so in the future. If there's a Linux version of a title we're releasing, our aim is to deliver it to you Day-1. But enough about us, let's talk about the games. Here's what you can be playing on Linux today:

Anomaly Warzone Earth
Ascendant
Bionic Dues
Blake Stone: Aliens of Gold - first time on Linux!
Blake Stone: Planet Strike - first time on Linux!
Bloodnet - first time on Linux!
Braveland
CLARC - first time on Linux!
Darklands - first time on Linux!
Darwinia
Defcon
Don't Starve + DLC
Dragonsphere - first time on Linux!
Duke Nukem 3D: Atomic Edition
FlatOut - first time on Linux!
Flatout 2 - first time on Linux!
Fragile Allegiance - first time on Linux!
Gemini Rue
Gods Will Be Watching
Hammerwatch
Hocus Pocus - first time on Linux!
Kentucky Route Zero
The Last Federation
Legend of Grimrock
Litil Divil - first time on Linux!
Long Live the Queen
MouseCraft
Multiwinia
Normality - first time on Linux!
Pinball Gold Pack - first time on Linux!
Pinball World - first time on Linux!
Pirates! Gold Plus - first time on Linux!
Realms of the Haunting - first time on Linux!
Rex Nebular and the Cosmic Gender Bender - first time on Linux!
Rise of the Triad: Dark War - first time on Linux!
Shattered Haven
The Shivah HD
Sid Meier's Colonization - first time on Linux!
Sid Meier's Covert Action - first time on Linux!
Sir, You Are Being Hunted
Slipstream 5000 - first time on Linux!
Space Pirates and Zombies
Spacechem
Stargunner - first time on Linux!
SteamWorld Dig
Super Hexagon
Surgeon Simulator 2013
Sword of the Samurai - first time on Linux!
Teslagrad
Unrest:Special Edition (Linux build on the way!)
Uplink
VVVVVV

As if this wasn't exciting enough, we've put more than half of these titles on a special promo! Head out to the promo page and find out which of them you can get up to 75% off until Tuesday, 9:59AM GMT. Of course, all of the games from the list above that you already own will be updated with Linux versions with no additional cost for you, just as you might have expected from GOG.com.

"OK, but how will Linux support actually work on GOG.com" - you might ask. For both native Linux versions, as well as special builds prepared by our team, GOG.com will provide distro-independent tar.gz archives and support convenient DEB installers for the two most popular Linux distributions: Ubuntu and Mint, in their current and future LTS editions. Helpful and responsive customer support has always been an important part of the GOG.com gaming experience. We wouldn't have it any other way when it comes to Linux, and starting today our helpdesk offers support for our official Linux releases on Ubuntu and Mint systems.

Diversity and freedom of choice have always been an important part of the GOG.com way. We're very glad that we could improve our service with the addition of the free (and DRM-Free) alternative to the commercial operating systems. Talking with gamers is just as important, so we're counting on your feedback! If you've got any questions, suggestions, or run into any trouble, just tell us in the forum thread below this post. Just please be gentle, this is [url=http://youtu.be/qBxbPts5tOk" target="_blank]our very first time[/url] with Linux. Happy launch day, everyone!
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
What don't you like? Which distro do you use? No OS is perfect. You do have a lot more customization options on Linux though.
Post edited July 29, 2014 by Matruchus
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
I'm a Linux fan and I could mention a few cons here and there. It certainly requires more patience and attention than Windows or Mac. I suggest using a Virtual Machine to practice (VMWare player is my favorite), also Linux Mint is a great distro for beginners and comfortability. :-)
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
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Ganni1987: I'm a Linux fan and I could mention a few cons here and there. It certainly requires more patience and attention than Windows or Mac. I suggest using a Virtual Machine to practice (VMWare player is my favorite), also Linux Mint is a great distro for beginners and comfortability. :-)
I prefer VirtualBox because it's an acceptable second to VMWare on both convenience and performance and it lets you experiment with open-source OSes in an open-source VM manager.

(Plus, it's available for both Windows and Linux, so you can have a fully open-source stack when you switch to Linux as the host OS without having to get used to a new tool.)
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
You're probably listening to the wrong crowd. We complain plenty about the shortcomings but these usually end up as bug reports :)

You may want to search for "linux sucks" on youtube. Bryan Lunduke's videos are at the top. Funny stuff, probably as close to geek stand-up comedy as it gets. Do check-out his "why linux desn't suck" videos too
Post edited July 29, 2014 by silviucc
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
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JudasIscariot: Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
And there's also a nice hotkey for that: Alt+Shift+F12

I have the default effects on, but on low-spec PC's KDE with effects can be really slow.
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JudasIscariot: Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
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Daliz: And there's also a nice hotkey for that: Alt+Shift+F12

I have the default effects on, but on low-spec PC's KDE with effects can be really slow.
Cool thanks :)
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
Usually these things are personal preferences. I don't like KDE and GNOME 3, but I have the option to choose another enviroment without problems. There is no point in talking about those things if they don't concern me anymore.

On the other hand many problems a beginner runs into are annoying because of the lack of knowledge on how to handle them. In earlier years I tried using linux several times and each time I gave up due to laziness ("But under Windows this works!"). Using linux is easy, LEARNING linux is a different matter.

And be assured, I can list you an interminable list of things annoying me on both windows and linux :)

Stay focused and you will get used to it.
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Tolya: There is no Graphics Mode Setup equivalent in Linux builds. We have no idea whether we will be making it or not. You are however more than welcome to access the .conf files which are inside the /Dosbox/ directory.

You need to look for the "output=" line, thats where the settings from the GMS are.
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stevenstarar: I've checked that out, but I can't get it to upscale 4x for a 1366x768 screen, and openglnb is way too slow on linux. Does GOG have a build of dosbox that uses a 4x scaler that could be used with overlay?
Yeah, there is no 4X scaler in default Dosbox Im afraid. You can try swapping the dosbox to one of the SVN builds, it should be pretty easy as it only involves in overwriting the binary and adding any of the libs that are required by a particular SVN.
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
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JudasIscariot: Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
Probably a bit off topic and many will disagree (or even hate me for saying so):

I always thought of OSX as the linux (or rather: unix) desktop done right.

(i know it's based on freebsd with proprietary parts, requires comically expensive hardware & the gui doesn't offer much customization, but unless one goes ultra low-level the console/shell works like on any unix... it's fully posix & X11 compliant & with homebrew one can compile & run most stuff from the debian repositories)

ten years ago i tried the linux desktop for two years and every time i test it again it's still a very rough diamond (unstable, insecure, unconfigurable & ugly) with ultra slow polishing applied (yes even the latest mint), however i do run all my servers on linux... cause thats what it does best.

but to each his own :)
Post edited July 29, 2014 by bernstein82
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Magmarock: Currently in the process of learning Linux. There are some things I like but also a lot of things I don't like. Linux fans really don't talk about the cons of the OS that much.
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JudasIscariot: Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
XFCE ftw.

*runs away after igniting GUI-al violence*
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JudasIscariot: Turn off all desktop effects if you are using a KDE desktop environment for an easier time, this is coming from someone who also is kind of a beginner as far as Linux is concerned :D
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Tolya: XFCE ftw.

*runs away after igniting GUI-al violence*
I know where you work.... Tiny >.>
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bernstein82: Probably a bit off topic and many will disagree (or even hate me for saying so):

I always thought of OSX as the linux (or rather: unix) desktop done right.
I agree. But that's what happens with closed source development by a company which treats user experience as it's primary focus. And also they work in their own limited hardwarespace.

You can dislike Apple for various reasons, but you gotta admit that their design is top notch.

However, I don't think Finder is superior to stuff like Nautilus or Thunar, to be honest. I have had much better experience with them when dealing with network shares. Of course enabling out-of-the-box support for Samba in Thunar has always been a roulette of packages.
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bernstein82: Probably a bit off topic and many will disagree (or even hate me for saying so):

I always thought of OSX as the linux (or rather: unix) desktop done right.
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Tolya: I agree. But that's what happens with closed source development by a company which treats user experience as it's primary focus. And also they work in their own limited hardwarespace.

You can dislike Apple for various reasons, but you gotta admit that their design is top notch.

However, I don't think Finder is superior to stuff like Nautilus or Thunar, to be honest. I have had much better experience with them when dealing with network shares. Of course enabling out-of-the-box support for Samba in Thunar has always been a roulette of packages.
While I'll agree that the Platinum UI used in MacOS 8 and 9 were top notch for their era, I've always felt Jobs made a mess of OSX with all the crazy ways he overruled the UI/UX experts in the name of glitz and bling. (And that's not even counting how not even apple consistently follows the Apple HIG (Human Interface Guidelines) anymore.)

Heck, even System 7's UI was excellent. I was almost exclusively a DOS/Win31/Win9x/WinXP/Linux gamer but, to this day, when I get a chance to use MacOS 7 through 9 for nostalgia gaming, the sheer amount of polish in the design makes it feel strangely captivating.
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bernstein82: Probably a bit off topic and many will disagree (or even hate me for saying so):

I always thought of OSX as the linux (or rather: unix) desktop done right.
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Tolya: However, I don't think Finder is superior to stuff like Nautilus or Thunar, to be honest. I have had much better experience with them when dealing with network shares. Of course enabling out-of-the-box support for Samba in Thunar has always been a roulette of packages.
While Finder has grown on me, i still long for the days of windows xp's explorer... i guess if one put them all in a blender the result would be a feature packed piece of art :-)

Besides i doubt there is one piece of common GUI software truly superoir to it's alternatives... each comes with different tradeoffs... most just don't fit everyone's taste/workflow. i long for the day when software workflows (e.g. user interfaces) adapt to the people and not the other way around... but the reality of software development tools still don't allow for that level of software complexity... we're not even close :-)