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I still find GOG's patching system pretty confusing and not that user-friendly...

If, in my browser, I open the drop down menu on a game in my library, there is no Changelog option. I have to left-click on the game first, to open the download view, and then click on the second drop down menu called "MORE" to find "Changelogs.

The Changelog for Shadowrun Hong Kong says "Patch 3.0.4 (08.31.2015)".
The Download section says "Patch 3.0.5 3.0.3 (GOG-1) -> 3.0.5 (GOG-3)".
The file name of the patch is called "patch_shadowrun_hong_kong_2.0.2.3.exe".

I guess the "3.0.4" vs. "3.0.5" is an oversight in this case, but I'll never understand why the file names need to be labeled differently than the actual game versions, and why GOG needs to have 2+ slightly different menus and settings pages for everything instead of offering all options in one central place.
Post edited 15 hours ago by Leroux
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Leroux: but I'll never understand why the file names need to be labeled differently than the actual game versions
Let's say GOG had a 1995 game two years ago, and had an installer that works just fine. Let's call said installer 2.1.41 and it has game version 1.41. Windows 10 comes out, and the game no longer works. GOG finds the needed fix (add a dll if on Windows 10), then repackages the installer. Shall they keep the 2.1.41 installer number, or will they have to change it, even though the game version remains at 1.41, or should they change the installer number?
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Leroux: but I'll never understand why the file names need to be labeled differently than the actual game versions
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JMich: Let's say GOG had a 1995 game two years ago, and had an installer that works just fine. Let's call said installer 2.1.41 and it has game version 1.41. Windows 10 comes out, and the game no longer works. GOG finds the needed fix (add a dll if on Windows 10), then repackages the installer. Shall they keep the 2.1.41 installer number, or will they have to change it, even though the game version remains at 1.41, or should they change the installer number?
It could at least be a little clearer what the numbers are supposed to mean. In your example, I guess they would rename it to something like 3.1.41 then? But in my example, I don't find the "3.0.5" patch number reflected in the "2.0.2.3" file name.
Changelog for Shadowrun: Hong Kong
Stickied for graet justice :P
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JudasIscariot: Stickied for graet justice :P
Thank you!
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Leroux: but I'll never understand why the file names need to be labeled differently than the actual game versions
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JMich: Let's say GOG had a 1995 game two years ago, and had an installer that works just fine. Let's call said installer 2.1.41 and it has game version 1.41. Windows 10 comes out, and the game no longer works. GOG finds the needed fix (add a dll if on Windows 10), then repackages the installer. Shall they keep the 2.1.41 installer number, or will they have to change it, even though the game version remains at 1.41, or should they change the installer number?
i think there are (at least) two problem with the current approach:

- the installer version does not only change if GOG changes the installer, but also if the game version changes. And the 4-digit scheme is way too complex. I think only GOG stuff knows what the several parts in there actually mean.
It would be better to replace that with a single number that only represents the current installer revision.

- both version numbers are kept seperate, ie the installer file only shows the installer version 2.1.41 while the changelog mentions only the update to game version 1.41. It would be better to stick the game version together with the installer revision(see last point). And then always use it together like this.

so it would be 1.41-r1, or 1.41-rev1 or 1.41-gog1 or something like that. and when gog repackages the installer it goes to 1.41-gog2. and when the game version changes you go to 1.42-gog1.
Just take a look how linux distributions handle this.
(You could even argue about omitting the revision number for the first version. so you go 1.41 -> 1.41-gog1 -> 1.41-gog2)

Back when the account overhaul was announced I actually thought they were going for a system like this. But their scheme of 1.41 (gogX) is only used in the library pages. The installer is still using the old version system and there is no way to see how the installer version correlates to the game version or the version listed in the changelog.
That is thouroughly confusing.