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DRM-free approach in games has been at the heart of GOG.COM from day one. We strongly believe that if you buy a game, it should be yours, and you can play it the way it’s convenient for you, and not how others want you to use it.

The landscape has changed since 2008, and today many people don’t realize what DRM even means. And still the DRM issue in games remains – you’re never sure when and why you can be blocked from accessing them. And it’s not only games that are affected, but your favourite books, music, movies and apps as well.

To help understand what DRM means, how it influences your games and other digital media, and what benefits come with DRM-free approach, we’re launching the FCK DRM initiative. The goal is to educate people and ignite a discussion about DRM. To learn more visit https://fckdrm.com, and share your opinions and stories about DRM and how it affects you.
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rjbuffchix: One thing that's been swept under the rug in recent years all across gaming is that multiplayer modes DO NOT REQUIRE DRM. Yes, developers and publishers insist upon them for various reasons, but in theory there is no reason we couldn't have DRM-free multiplayer.
It's the usual question of "effort"; it takes devs very minimal effort to remove DRM.

On the other side creating their own LAN and multiplayer support is not. Especially when Steam, who represent 90% of the market, provides it's own library that makes it "easy".

That's why the multiplayer has never really been part of the Gog DRM-free promise, there was no way they could ever convince Devs to develop a "DRM-free" Multiplayer just for them and why for a very long time Devs simply disabled the multiplayer on the Gog version.
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rjbuffchix: Honestly I recommend you do like I do: focus on the titles that don't require that stuff.
Is there a list?

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SirPrimalform: 1. The DRM-free promise has only ever applied to the single player portion of games.
2. GOG doesn't add Galaxy support, the developer or publisher does. If previously existing LAN support has been removed, it will have been done so by the developer or publisher.

People can probably offer more information if you say which game it is.
1: Even if that were true it doesn't make it ok.
2: GOG created Galaxy with the ability for developers to include DRM. If the pinned statement at the top of this thread was true then they would have built a system that wouldn't allow DRM to function, and they'd have made it free software.

The game is Stronghold Crusader 2, not that it matters.
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rjbuffchix: Honestly I recommend you do like I do: focus on the titles that don't require that stuff.
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David_Healey: Is there a list?
Not an official list, per se...but iirc users have kept track in a forum topic that I just tried to find to link for you, to no avail. I think the topic approached it the reverse way, games that did require Galaxy...but you would get the needed information regardless. Hopefully another user can assist with finding this topic.

In the meantime, I'd say the most obvious way is to check the gamepages: If there is a game you're interested in, go to the gamepage here on the store, scroll down below system requirements (but above where reviews being)...it will say something like "Note: GOG Galaxy is required to access multiplayer" or "Note: A free Paradox account is required for multiplayer". Then for the most part, you will know that multiplayer is gated behind those things.

Please note that some of these games may still have some offline multiplayer options (like hotseat or same-screen multiplayer), though the vast, vast majority do not. If you are unsure, I would ask around either on the game sub-forum or here where people may own the game and have knowledge of client requirements/lack thereof. Note too that the right side of gamepages here on the store will list features like "Controller Support" "Single Player" "Multiplayer" but that is useless for our purposes here because it doesn't distinguish between client/third party account required multiplayer versus say offline with bots multiplayer.
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David_Healey:
Which game was that?
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David_Healey:
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InkPanther: Which game was that?
Err.. the one I said in my last post :p Stronghold Crusader 2

I will not buy another game from GOG.
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InkPanther: Which game was that?
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David_Healey: Err.. the one I said in my last post :p Stronghold Crusader 2

I will not buy another game from GOG.
I've missed that, sorry!

On the product page there's a notice about Galaxy being required for multiplayer. And that low rating should raise a couple of red flags from the start. ;P
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InkPanther: Which game was that?
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David_Healey: Err.. the one I said in my last post :p Stronghold Crusader 2

I will not buy another game from GOG.
How's it GOG's fault when you are playing a certain game that isn't supported by your OS natively and you using unofficial methods to get the game to work? Since you are using unofficial methods to get the game working is ON YOU and NOT GOG.
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David_Healey: Err.. the one I said in my last post :p Stronghold Crusader 2

I will not buy another game from GOG.
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Fender_178: How's it GOG's fault when you are playing a certain game that isn't supported by your OS natively and you using unofficial methods to get the game to work? Since you are using unofficial methods to get the game working is ON YOU and NOT GOG.
I'm not complaining that the game isn't officially supported by my OS (although it runs just fine). I'm complaining about the DRM.
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David_Healey: 1: Even if that were true it doesn't make it ok.
2: GOG created Galaxy with the ability for developers to include DRM. If the pinned statement at the top of this thread was true then they would have built a system that wouldn't allow DRM to function, and they'd have made it free software.

The game is Stronghold Crusader 2, not that it matters.
1. You're going to have to elaborate. If you're saying it's not "ok" to ever sell anything with DRM then I suggest you don't look at any other online games store because you're going to have a bad time. GOG is better than the other available options, but if they've decided to allow DRM on multiplayer games then that's their prerogative. If there are no stores doing what you want then I suggest you start your own.
2. It isn't GOG's fault if a developer abuses a multiplayer framework to use as DRM. If Stronghold Crusader II had LAN and this was removed, the culprits are Firefly Studios. GOG neither requires nor asks developers to remove LAN.

Oh, and of course it matters which game.

https://en.softonic.com/articles/stronghold-crusader-ii-like-a-castle-in-the-sand
Here's an article from around the time the game was released.
The skirmish mode doesn’t support local network multiplayer, but runs exclusively online via Steam. You can also connect with other players using Steam and collect Steam achievements.
So it rather sounds like the game never supported LAN in the first place, rendering your accusations that GOG has removed LAN even more ridiculous.
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David_Healey: I will not buy another game from GOG.
Because GOG didn't remove a feature a game never even had? Ok Mr Logic.
Post edited 5 days ago by SirPrimalform
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SirPrimalform: (snip)
I wouldn't waste my breath if I were you.
The GOG forum seems to be getting weirder and weirder these last months. Don't know if it's a side effect of the epidemic and chaos or just a natural evolution of global stupidity.
Plenty of folk seem to be feeling more and more entitled in a very bad way. And I'm starting to understand the reason why GOG "veterans" are starting to abandon the forums as the toxicity is palpable.

Not saying that some critics to GOG aren't right. GOG definitely needs to get its act together and fast (of course this Covid chaos isn't helping at all in the moment). But I get the feeling that GOG grew too big and too fast for its own sake. And started to attract the wrong type of crowd. But it's just my opinion, of course.

I also find it strange how, lately, GOG seems to be getting more support from the "mixed" customers (people who also buy on steam or epic) than from the "DRM-free" zealots like me. The world is indeed turned upside-down. :(
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karnak1: ...
You're right on all accounts. It's funny, because I am considered a DRM-free zealot by most for my refusal to use Steam etc, but some of the people all the noise on the forums these days make me look moderate.
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karnak1: I wouldn't waste my breath if I were you.
The GOG forum seems to be getting weirder and weirder these last months. Don't know if it's a side effect of the epidemic and chaos or just a natural evolution of global stupidity.
Plenty of folk seem to be feeling more and more entitled in a very bad way. And I'm starting to understand the reason why GOG "veterans" are starting to abandon the forums as the toxicity is palpable.
https://derpicdn.net/img/view/2012/9/17/100549.png
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karnak1: I wouldn't waste my breath if I were you.
The GOG forum seems to be getting weirder and weirder these last months. Don't know if it's a side effect of the epidemic and chaos or just a natural evolution of global stupidity.
Plenty of folk seem to be feeling more and more entitled in a very bad way. And I'm starting to understand the reason why GOG "veterans" are starting to abandon the forums as the toxicity is palpable.
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ArachnosX: https://derpicdn.net/img/view/2012/9/17/100549.png
Damn! :O
Judging by your backlog you're what I call a real GOG supporter. And I'd never seen you on the forums before.

I wish more people here were like you.
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karnak1: Damn! :O
Judging by your backlog you're what I call a real GOG supporter. And I'd never seen you on the forums before.

I wish more people here were like you.
I really like the fact that with GOG you actually have a reasonable chance of owning most of the games unlike Steam where its only oil tycoons that'll be able to buy all their endless shovelware.
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David_Healey: 1: Even if that were true it doesn't make it ok.
2: GOG created Galaxy with the ability for developers to include DRM. If the pinned statement at the top of this thread was true then they would have built a system that wouldn't allow DRM to function, and they'd have made it free software.

The game is Stronghold Crusader 2, not that it matters.
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SirPrimalform: 1. You're going to have to elaborate. If you're saying it's not "ok" to ever sell anything with DRM then I suggest you don't look at any other online games store because you're going to have a bad time. GOG is better than the other available options, but if they've decided to allow DRM on multiplayer games then that's their prerogative. If there are no stores doing what you want then I suggest you start your own.
2. It isn't GOG's fault if a developer abuses a multiplayer framework to use as DRM. If Stronghold Crusader II had LAN and this was removed, the culprits are Firefly Studios. GOG neither requires nor asks developers to remove LAN.

Oh, and of course it matters which game.

https://en.softonic.com/articles/stronghold-crusader-ii-like-a-castle-in-the-sand
Here's an article from around the time the game was released.

The skirmish mode doesn’t support local network multiplayer, but runs exclusively online via Steam. You can also connect with other players using Steam and collect Steam achievements.
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SirPrimalform: So it rather sounds like the game never supported LAN in the first place, rendering your accusations that GOG has removed LAN even more ridiculous.
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David_Healey: I will not buy another game from GOG.
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SirPrimalform: Because GOG didn't remove a feature a game never even had? Ok Mr Logic.
1: Yes, there should be no DRM ever. Companies should not restrict their customers. But regardless of what I think, GOG made a statement, pinned to the top of this thread, that they clearly don't stand by.

2: It is GOG's fault, let me explain.

a) GOG has created a proprietary system. For a developer (such as firefly) to make use of that system they must have GOG's permission to use it, and GOG has provided them with the necessary API/Server details to interface with it. GOG could have said no, not unless you also make an option that doesn't restrict our users or you release the server software so people can run their own server.

b) GOG has created a proprietary system. If they release the system as free software, or at least release the API/Server interface then I could connect through a different client that doesn't include the DRM.

You're right about the game not including LAN originally, I was confusing it with Stronghold 2 which did include LAN until it was removed in a downgrade.