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No man's island.

Seven: The Days Long Gone is now available for pre-order DRM-free on GOG.com with a 10% discount and the Shadowhand Armor DLC as pre-order bonuses.
An isometric open-world RPG that you can stealth or fight through as the talented master thief Teriel. Roam freely across the vast prison island of Peh using guile and manipulation to decide the fate of its inhabitants but be careful - your actions could steal your fate.

Go for the Digital Collector's Edition to get the Art book, a digital map of Peh, the Soundtrack, a Guide book, and the Shadowhand armor DLC.

Watch the trailer.
Post edited October 05, 2017 by maladr0Id
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joppo: ... I hope that you're not the guy that chooses the tags for the games.
aahhh, so he's one of the people responsible for the netflix genre-tagging ridiculousness!!!
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joppo: ... I hope that you're not the guy that chooses the tags for the games.
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drealmer7: aahhh, so he's one of the people responsible for the netflix genre-tagging ridiculousness!!!
Oh no, if that was true Abe's Odyssey would be a a gory alien genocide-survival stealth combat game, while Flashback would be a 16-bit sci-fi high-tech original action-adventure and Street Fighter would be a violent cartoonish critically-acclaimed brawling platformer (heh)
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amok: which is, off course, a bit rubbish. do they do the same with everything, or is it just for games?
I would say that it isn't really common in other narrative media. At least I've never seen something like "Pre-Order the book and get a bonus chapter!" or "Pre-Order the TV Series on DVD and you'll get a special episode!".
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amok: which is, off course, a bit rubbish. do they do the same with everything, or is it just for games?
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PaterAlf: I would say that it isn't really common in other narrative media. At least I've never seen something like "Pre-Order the book and get a bonus chapter!" or "Pre-Order the TV Series on DVD and you'll get a special episode!".
I think he meant 'do people complain about everything else in the same manner or is it just for games?' Of course, I don't feel the examples he gives for comparison are valid, but that's another issue.
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Ghorpm: I don't agree. First of all some of the games you mentioned do contain intense jumping sections (Another World - running away from water) and in general they require some precision and good reflexes. The Swapper has none of these - it's a 2D game about puzzles.
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_ChaosFox_: Well, of course that's your right to disagree, but in any case, you are in a distinct minority when it comes to describing The Swapper as "not a platformer". Even the developer itself refers to it as a "puzzle platformer", as does the author of the Wikipedia article, PC Gamer, PSN and Eurogamer.

Also, VVVVVV, Bionic Commando (the old arcade game and the NES game, not the 3D reboot) and Burger Time are all widely considered platformers and don't even have any jumping mechanics. Jumping is not a prerequisite of the genre. There are only three defining characteristics of 2D platformers: the character is directly controlled by the player, the character is mostly bound by the laws of gravity, the player's agency is restricted mostly to a 2D plane viewed from the side. Everything else is open to interpretation.

I should say I personally don't have any issue with you not considering The Swapper to be a platformer - everyone has the right to define genre boundaries for their own purposes as they see fit. But you shouldn't claim your definition to be the definitive one.
Sure, a lot depends on how a person feel about it but my point is that nowadays "platformer" is very close to "2D, side-view" so basically says something about the presentation of the game and not about how it's supposed to be played. Are Dex, Terraria and Windforge platformer games? I prefer to think about them as 2D RPG and sandbox games, respectively. Ethan Meteor Hunter, Teslagrad or Vessel (especially the last two) are good examples of puzzle platformers for me. They are more, I don't know, arcady - requiring some good reflexes. As I said before - The Swapper is all about puzzles, my friend finished this game with a broken finger.

But yeah, I don't claim that my definition is the best one, sorry if I made it look this way.
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amok: which is, off course, a bit rubbish. do they do the same with everything, or is it just for games?

If a neighbor builds an extension to his house, is mine incomplete? If you get a "directors cut" with cut scenes of a film as a bonus material, is my film incomplete? If you get fluffy dice for your car mirror, is my car incomplete? if you get a complementary chocolate on your pillow at the hotel, and I do not, is my holiday incomplete? and so on and so forth...
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Kakarot96: But i am paying the same as you to buy a "directors cut" and mine don't have the bonus materials because they wanted us to pay for that before the film was even made...I want to know first is the film is good, while you seem to have paid (the same amount) while they were still filming.
Which is perfectly fine, and your choice. You don't want to take the risk, and therefore you also do not get the reward. Which I think is logical, fair, and everybody's own choice. (edit - I don't pre-order either, I like to know what I buy)

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Kakarot96: Also, it's not just a "bonus scene", but a feature that let's you play the movie on your video much better than mine, that plays with less FPS and feels clunky compared with yours...
That analogy does not quite work, as you are implying that the bonus content somehow makes the engine better, so that to compare the DVD bonus content should somehow improve your framerate, remove stutter, create a better booming bass, make it spin faster or have better color resolution, which is off course not the case.

A better comparison would be to say that the bonus content on the special limited edition DVD have some cut scenes containing some more character exposition, which had been cut to improve the pacing of the film. Yes, the one with the bonus content will have more background info, but arguably the film is better in the original version as the pacing is better and more coherent.
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amok: which is, off course, a bit rubbish. do they do the same with everything, or is it just for games?

If a neighbor builds an extension to his house, is mine incomplete? If you get a "directors cut" with cut scenes of a film as a bonus material, is my film incomplete? If you get fluffy dice for your car mirror, is my car incomplete? if you get a complementary chocolate on your pillow at the hotel, and I do not, is my holiday incomplete? and so on and so forth...
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CharlesGrey: Which is, of course, a collection of various analogies which are quite frankly a bit rubbish, because none of these actually describe a comparable situation.
why, whats wrong with them (apart from the house extension...) I feel they may not be the best examples, but still valid.
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PaterAlf: I would say that it isn't really common in other narrative media. At least I've never seen something like "Pre-Order the book and get a bonus chapter!" or "Pre-Order the TV Series on DVD and you'll get a special episode!".
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GR00T: I think he meant 'do people complain about everything else in the same manner or is it just for games?' Of course, I don't feel the examples he gives for comparison are valid, but that's another issue.
aye, I am very bad finding good analogies and examples
Post edited October 06, 2017 by amok
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Vythonaut: You're being harsh, sir. This thing "won’t slow you down as much as other armor sets in the same class" plus it's for you, not your horse! ;)
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joppo: My last girlfriend said she was breaking up with me because I was "too fast". I don't really understand it, but I guess that once I buy the game I'll stick with the non-exclusive armors,

:p
The b*tch! XD Don't worry pal, just wear a full set of heavy armor and you'll be alright. These days are long gone anyway.. :D
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CharlesGrey: Which is, of course, a collection of various analogies which are quite frankly a bit rubbish, because none of these actually describe a comparable situation.
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amok: why, whats wrong with them (apart from the house extension...) I feel they may not be the best examples, but still valid.
I don't even know where to start... One problem is, you're comparing physical goods with purely digital content. Physical goods, due to their nature, have production costs and a limited supply, while data can be copied infinitely at little or no additional costs. Furthermore, you're talking of custom goods such as buildings -- Even in cases where they have the same basic architecture, they're not identical, because every owner will customize and decorate them to their liking. On top of that, they also don't have standardized prices, so if your neighbor has a bigger house or fancier car, you can bet they also spent more money on it than you.

Also, you seem to assume that people take issue with these pre-order bonuses because of jealousy, but that's not what it's about. People just don't like getting scammed by publishers, and that's all there is to it. Pre-orders of digital releases have various advantages for the publishers and devs, but just about zero for the paying customer. ( Except maybe in special cases, where the distributor allows pre-downloads of bigger games, so you can play right at release. ) That's why they have to create all these silly artificial enticements, because otherwise very few people would put down the money before the game is even out.

From the customer's point of view, there's zero logical reason why they should receive a less complete game ( no matter how small the missing part is ), just because they buy the game a few days after release, especially if they pay the same price as the people who pre-order ( or more, if there's a pre-order discount ).

There are ways to make pre-orders and early purchases attractive to the customer ( such as another game being included in the deal, and keeping the special deal available until after the official release, as GOG has done with some other new games ), without resorting to these scams, and it's perfectly reasonable if customers are fed up with this bullshit and don't want to support such business tactics.
Post edited October 06, 2017 by CharlesGrey
amok is just so far off with his brain, I'm impressed with the patience some of you have trying to explain it

not sure it's even been mentioned but another aspect of it is rewarding / giving extra benefits to people who have more money than others
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amok: why, whats wrong with them (apart from the house extension...) I feel they may not be the best examples, but still valid.
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CharlesGrey: I don't even know where to start... One problem is, you're comparing physical goods with purely digital content. Physical goods, due to their nature, have production costs and a limited supply, while data can be copied infinitely at little or no additional costs. Furthermore, you're talking of custom goods such as buildings -- Even in cases where they have the same basic architecture, they're not identical, because every owner will customize and decorate them to their liking. On top of that, they also don't have standardized prices, so if your neighbor has a bigger house or fancier car, you can bet they also spent more money on it than you.

Also, you seem to assume that people take issue with these pre-order bonuses because of jealousy, but that's not what it's about. People just don't like getting scammed by publishers, and that's all there is to it. Pre-orders of digital releases have various advantages for the publishers and devs, but just about zero for the paying customer. ( Except maybe in special cases, where the distributor allows pre-downloads of bigger games, so you can play right at release. ) That's why they have to create all these silly artificial enticements, because otherwise very few people would put down the money before the game is even out.

From the customer's point of view, there's zero logical reason why they should receive a less complete game ( no matter how small the missing part is ), just because they buy the game a few days after release, especially if they pay the same price as the people who pre-order ( or more, if there's a pre-order discount ).

There are ways to make pre-orders and early purchases attractive to the customer ( such as another game being included in the deal, and keeping the special deal available until after the official release, as GOG has done with some other new games ), without resorting to these scams, and it's perfectly reasonable if customers are fed up with this bullshit and don't want to support such business tactics.
That's a nice good rant and all, but you are conflating two different issues here. The stupidity of pre-order and "mah game is incomplete!!1!!1". Mine examples where only on the later, i did not even though upon the former. The question was, do people feel this "completeness" only apply to games or also to other products?

My position on pre-order is that it is silly and a gamble, but whatever floats your boat. And I see no problem with people taking that gamble may also get a different reward than me who do not.
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amok: The question was, do people feel this "completeness" only apply to games or also to other products?

My position on pre-order is that it is silly and a gamble, but whatever floats your boat. And I see no problem with people taking that gamble may also get a different reward than me who do not.
Much as you have a (arguable) point here, it's against an argument no one is making - or rather some do as a minor argument that's only intended to support the actual major arguments.

Your examples are flawed because none of them touch the issue of artificial unavailability. If I decide I'm enjoying my car and I would enjoy it even more if I had that dice, nothing forbids me from buying one. Except if it has run out of stock, which is a common occurrence in the physical world but should be a non-issue for digital products. So I can understand companies not selling the physical product after preorder ended but there's no excuse for this shit we gamers face again and again.
If the armor set was being sold separate after the preorders ended I would have no issue with it. This one appears to be slightly less bad because it appears to purchasable afterwards... except you need to buy the Collector's Edition. So it's a different way to screw the customer. But I digress.

Years ago I happened across a game (can't remember which one anymore) that was in the market for a while already. I was thinking of buying it, but before I did I read about many items that made the game better and I couldn't have anymore because they were preorder exclusives. I got very pissed at it and didn't even buy the game. What was my fault? Not knowing about the game before the launch months earlier? Latecomers should have a time machine to get the most enjoyment out of the product they're willing to purchase?

I have no problem with preorders per si (although I rarely engage in them because I don't want to reward a practice that as said has no advantages for us customers). But I think most of us goggers have a problem with publishers putting us in this sort of position: either I buy while I can't know if the game is actually worth my money or forget about that content I'd like to have if the game turns out good.

BTW, as I suppose is clear from my post, the motivation for my dislike of preorder exclusives is definitely not envy, which was the core of your examples above.
Post edited October 07, 2017 by joppo
I've been greatly looking forward to this game! Isometric thief.. awesome. :)
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amok: The question was, do people feel this "completeness" only apply to games or also to other products?

My position on pre-order is that it is silly and a gamble, but whatever floats your boat. And I see no problem with people taking that gamble may also get a different reward than me who do not.
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joppo: Much as you have a (arguable) point here, it's against an argument no one is making - or rather some do as a minor argument that's only intended to support the actual major arguments.

Your examples are flawed because none of them touch the issue of artificial unavailability. If I decide I'm enjoying my car and I would enjoy it even more if I had that dice, nothing forbids me from buying one. Except if it has run out of stock, which is a common occurrence in the physical world but should be a non-issue for digital products. So I can understand companies not selling the physical product after preorder ended but there's no excuse for this shit we gamers face again and again.
If the armor set was being sold separate after the preorders ended I would have no issue with it. This one appears to be slightly less bad because it appears to purchasable afterwards... except you need to buy the Collector's Edition. So it's a different way to screw the customer. But I digress.

Years ago I happened across a game (can't remember which one anymore) that was in the market for a while already. I was thinking of buying it, but before I did I read about many items that made the game better and I couldn't have anymore because they were preorder exclusives. I got very pissed at it and didn't even buy the game. What was my fault? Not knowing about the game before the launch months earlier? Latecomers should have a time machine to get the most enjoyment out of the product they're willing to purchase?

I have no problem with preorders per si (although I rarely engage in them because I don't want to reward a practice that as said has no advantages for us customers). But I think most of us goggers have a problem with publishers putting us in this sort of position: either I buy while I can't know if the game is actually worth my money or forget about that content I'd like to have if the game turns out good.

BTW, as I suppose is clear from my post, the motivation for my dislike of preorder exclusives is definitely not envy, which was the core of your examples above.
no, actually, the core is not envy, but the puzzling phenomenon that something suddenly perceived as incomplete. And arguably, the artificial unavailability argument can be extended to physical goods also. For example, there is a limited special edition of Watchmen, printed in only 1000 copies which contains additional commentaries by Moore and Gibson. There is no reason why there are only 1000 copies, there could just as likely have been 100.000. However, does this make my blog standard, yet complete, edition less complete, due its existence? Does it mean I can no longer enjoy reading it?
omg, dude, get your brain checked, there's a lot of really simple concepts that you are just not grasping

those are physical things that take resources to create and once created the company receives a loss if they don't sell
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_ChaosFox_: An "isometric view" is simply a gaming term that has become established to maintain some degree of continuity with its design predecessors [...] in gaming terms, an "isometric perspective" refers to any gaming style based on a view at between roughly 20° and 45° on the vertical with a camera that is either freely rotatable or locked with the paths appearing diagonal in nature.
Isometric games were referred to as "isometric" precisely because they rendered scenes using isometric projection (or the closest approximation that pixel dimensions allowed for).

It's simply not true to say that the word means something different when applied to games. "In gaming terms" isometric means exactly the same thing that it means in non-gaming terms.