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For someone who are not participating in the boycott, and are not taking this boycott seriously, you guys sure are taking this boycott seriously.

One could even call it lashing out.
Zoom is GOG alternative like GOG is Steam alternative.
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fronzelneekburm: That part you quoted was a late addition, mostly to cover your own ass because you caved in and bought some stuff during the winter sale.
It would be abundantly clear to anyone reading the first 10-15 pages of the thread that it was intended from the very start that anyone who is significantly reducing their spending is welcome to join the main boycott list. That has always been the 'policy'.

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fronzelneekburm: I mean, what even is the bloody point of the "sympathetic" list then?
For people who sympathize with the cause, but not to the extent that they want to significantly reduce their spending?

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fronzelneekburm: Ahh, waiting for the Zoom Platform version, I see. ;o)
I've been lukewarm about Skyrim ever since it was first released. I loved Morrowind, but Oblivion was a big step down, imo, and I have the impression Skyrim is quite overrated. I don't own/haven't played Witcher 3 either and I would probably play that ahead of Skyrim, as it looks a lot better.
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richlind33: Zoom is GOG alternative like GOG is Steam alternative.
Red Candle Games is a GOG alternative
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Time4Tea: I've been lukewarm about Skyrim ever since it was first released. I loved Morrowind, but Oblivion was a big step down, imo, and I have the impression Skyrim is quite overrated. I don't own/haven't played Witcher 3 either and I would probably play that ahead of Skyrim, as it looks a lot better.
Is Skyrim worth breaking one's boycott (however they define it)? I think that depends, and is worth being discussed in this topic. A related point which may be of interest to those in this topic is how GOG is handling Skyrim's mods. I have to say I am unclear on how it works but the impression I'm getting now is that one has to use a mod manager app from Nexus, which is problematic to me and others. I thought I read, solmewhere, that there is a rumor of GOG coming out with some sort of "Galaxy Mods" (which is a no thanks from me). Anyone who knows better or who can articulate this all better, please feel free to correct/enlighten me.
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rjbuffchix: Is Skyrim worth breaking one's boycott (however they define it)? I think that depends, and is worth being discussed in this topic. A related point which may be of interest to those in this topic is how GOG is handling Skyrim's mods. I have to say I am unclear on how it works but the impression I'm getting now is that one has to use a mod manager app from Nexus, which is problematic to me and others. I thought I read, solmewhere, that there is a rumor of GOG coming out with some sort of "Galaxy Mods" (which is a no thanks from me). Anyone who knows better or who can articulate this all better, please feel free to correct/enlighten me.
I agree and I think this is also worth discussing. The release of Skyrim is a big event, as it's probably one of the most popular games of the past 20 years and one of the most requested on GOG.

Despite the issues I have with GOG and the boycott etc., I think it's a good thing to see Skyrim released on GOG. I am above all a supporter of DRM-free and I will always celebrate the liberation of a major game that wasn't available DRM-free before. This release is a good thing and gives some hope that more of the recent AAA games will see DRM-free releases at some point.

But yes, the mod-ability does seem to be a valid concern. DRM-free means there must be no restrictions at all on how a game can be played/used. If the developer is trying to restrict or control how the game can be modded, by requiring the use of a third-party mod manager, then that might be straying into 'DRM territory'. I also find these rumors of GOG looking at 'Galaxy Mods' to be quite concerning. Hopefully the issues around mod-ability will be clarified and the game will ultimately be freely mod-able, without the mandatory use of third-party tools (which should always be optional).

Personally, I'm not going to buy it right now, but I might try it at some point in the future (if only to see what all the fuss was about). Also, bear in mind that it'll almost certainly be at this price every time GOG does a sale (and we all know how frequent those are).
Post edited 2 hours ago by Time4Tea
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rjbuffchix: Is Skyrim worth breaking one's boycott (however they define it)? I think that depends, and is worth being discussed in this topic. A related point which may be of interest to those in this topic is how GOG is handling Skyrim's mods. I have to say I am unclear on how it works but the impression I'm getting now is that one has to use a mod manager app from Nexus, which is problematic to me and others. I thought I read, solmewhere, that there is a rumor of GOG coming out with some sort of "Galaxy Mods" (which is a no thanks from me). Anyone who knows better or who can articulate this all better, please feel free to correct/enlighten me.
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Time4Tea: I agree and I think this is also worth discussing. The release of Skyrim is a big event, as it's probably one of the most popular games of the past 20 years and one of the most requested on GOG.

Despite the issues I have with GOG and the boycott etc., I think it's a good thing to see Skyrim released on GOG. I am above all a supporter of DRM-free and I will always celebrate the liberation of a major game that wasn't available DRM-free before. This release is a good thing and gives some hope that more of the recent AAA games will see DRM-free releases at some point.

But yes, the mod-ability does seem to be a valid concern. DRM-free means there must be no restrictions at all on how a game can be played/used. If the developer is trying to restrict or control how the game can be modded, by requiring the use of a third-party mod manager, then that might be straying into 'DRM territory'. I also find these rumors of GOG looking at 'Galaxy Mods' to be quite concerning. Hopefully the issues around mod-ability will be clarified and the game will ultimately be freely mod-able, without the mandatory use of third-party tools (which should always be optional).

Personally, I'm not going to buy it right now, but I might try it at some point in the future (if only to see what all the fuss was about). Also, bear in mind that it'll almost certainly be at this price every time GOG does a sale (and we all know how frequent those are).
The mods that are compatible or not with the gog version have nothing to do with the drm. The drm is the restriction of using a good in the official way without modification.

Because it's not up to the developer or publisher to make a game compatible with a mod. But the reverse. A mod as well as the tools for modding is a privilege that the studio makes to the players.


Nothing obliges them and even worse can if wish it prohibit it whatever the reason. Modding is already legal only if the developers or publishers allow it.


They can ban it and even sue modders if they want because a game is a cultural product like a music, book or painting. We have a perfect example with nintendo which pursues all modders

And diverting a cultural product without authorization is in fact a crime.
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Lukin86:
I respectfully disagree with you Lukin. Modding has been a big part of PC games for decades, from very early on. Many PC gamers expect PC games to be mod-able to some extent and it's arguable that it is part of what distinguishes PC games from console games.

Digital Rights Management can refer to anything that is built into a game, which aims to control or restrict how players can play or use the game, after it has been purchased, including modding. I agree there is no obligation for developers to make PC games easily mod-able, or to provide tools to facilitate it. But I would argue that built-in technologies that deliberately aim to control, restrict or monetize mods are a form of DRM.

It is similar to a situation where the main game is released DRM-free, but post-release DLCs can only be played with a third-party client installed (just that, in the mod case, the content has been made by someone else). If the main game was only playable with the use of a client, many would call that DRM.
Post edited 1 hour ago by Time4Tea
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rjbuffchix: A related point which may be of interest to those in this topic is how GOG is handling Skyrim's mods. I have to say I am unclear on how it works but the impression I'm getting now is that one has to use a mod manager app from Nexus, which is problematic to me and others. I thought I read, solmewhere, that there is a rumor of GOG coming out with some sort of "Galaxy Mods" (which is a no thanks from me). Anyone who knows better or who can articulate this all better, please feel free to correct/enlighten me.
It's possible to mod Skyrim SE (GOG) manually and offline (similar to Skyrim LE, Oblivion & Morrowind). You need to:-

1. Add mods to the game install \data subfolder, ie, unzip them into there after manually downloading them from Nexus.

2. The file the game uses to "see" the mods is called %LOCALAPPDATA%\Skyrim Special Edition GOG\plugins.txt and you need to include the names of each .esp filenames of the mods you added and arrange correct load order.

3. Mod utilities (eg, Nexus Mod Manager), will mistakenly look for the file in %LOCALAPPDATA%\Skyrim Special Edition where Steam installs it. You may need to copy / move this to %LOCALAPPDATA%\Skyrim Special Edition GOG for the game to see it.

4. For SKSE, use the file called "Current GOG Anniversary Edition build 2.2.2 (game version 1.6.659)" from here. You would unzip this into the main game folder (next to the .exe's rather than in the data subfolder) then run skse64_loader.exe.

Despite some false and misleading information some are giving about the "need" for clients / mod managers, in reality nothing has really changed about how the mechanics of Creation Engine mods work, ie, the game will look for %LOCALAPPDATA%\Skyrim Special Edition GOG\plugins.txt file, and read the mentioned .esp mod filenames from its \data subfolder, little different to how Oblivion functions (which stores its mod load order in %LOCALAPPDATA%\Oblivion).
Post edited 56 minutes ago by AB2012
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richlind33: Zoom is GOG alternative like GOG is Steam alternative.
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Linko64: Red Candle Games is a GOG alternative
GOG is a Steam alternative only for the people that highly value "DRM-free" games, which is a somewhat fuzzy concept. Beyond that GOG is just a modestly larger Zoom compared to Steam. It would like to be a Steam alternative but that requires them to be like Steam, and even then it's a silly pipe dream at this late stage of the game.

So no, Zoom is definitely NOT a GOG alternative. Never heard of Red Candle Games so I'll check them out.
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Lukin86:
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Time4Tea: Digital Rights Management can refer to anything that is built into a game, which aims to control or restrict how players can play or use the game, after it has been purchased, including modding. I agree there is no obligation for developers to make PC games easily mod-able, or to provide tools to facilitate it. But I would argue that built-in technologies that deliberately aim to control, restrict or monetize mods are a form of DRM.
Really? Trying to expand the DRM meanings? More ammo for the crusade? Now it Is also DRM a game not specifically designed to be modded from scratch? At which level? Are some games more DRM'd depending the level of modability?

This is already starting to be a joke.
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Linko64: Red Candle Games is a GOG alternative
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richlind33: GOG is a Steam alternative only for the people that highly value "DRM-free" games, which is a somewhat fuzzy concept. Beyond that GOG is just a modestly larger Zoom compared to Steam. It would like to be a Steam alternative but that requires them to be like Steam, and even then it's a silly pipe dream at this late stage of the game.

So no, Zoom is definitely NOT a GOG alternative. Never heard of Red Candle Games so I'll check them out.
I mean the post was a joke but the bold text was the even bigger joke my guy