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I've put together a Wine wrapper for System Shock 2, allowing it to be played on Linux almost like a native game & with no Wine knowledge required. This game has had an official Linux release for a long time, but it's only available on Steam and unfortunately shows no signs of turning up here (plus the official release only uses a Wine wrapper anyway...)

Simply place the script, resource archive and installer files together in the same directory & run the script. The output is a directory containing a "GOG-style" ready-to-go Wine-wrapped version of the game (the build script also has the option to create a tarball of the assembled game package); from there installation is simply a case of moving the directory to wherever you want it installed to - then just run the start script to play, create a shortcut for the game, access the advanced options etc :)

(to uninstall simply delete the game directory and any shortcuts you created, and the game's user data directory in ~/.local/share if you don't want to keep your saves & settings)

Running the start script with the argument "play" will bypass the menu and start the game immediately (this is the default setting for shortcuts created by the script).

User saves are stored under ~/.local/share/sshock2

Full details are in the readme.txt and release notes. Here is the download link:

sshock2_wine.tar.xz
(10.9 kB, SHA256: ec9f7fecde8a6f05d5aa5a914e36f1039d8dfcc928bbdbf9197ee7e0dcbb7d95)

Updated 2017/09/12: Update for all wrappers' start scripts to create additional user directories inside the prefix that may be needed if installing things such as third party tools/utilities, or certain redistributables. Some wrappers also have other small misc improvements.

The wrapper uses Wine Staging 2.0 with CSMT enabled. Wine and Winetricks will be downloaded automatically if not present; to avoid redownloading for other scripts the downloaded Wine package will be stored in ~/.cache/winewrap

There shouldn't be any problems as I've previously done a complete playthrough of the game using an earlier version of Wine without issue and there's no reason to suspect this has changed. However if anyone does run into any problems then post in this thread, Adamhm's Linux Wine Wrappers - News, FAQ & Discussion and/or The "Judas™ does this run in Wine" thread v1.173.

Multiplayer has not been tested and may or may not work.

For more of my Linux Wine wrappers see my GOGmix: adamhm's Linux Wine wrappers. Also check out Adamhm's Linux Wine Wrappers - News, FAQ & Discussion
Post edited September 12, 2017 by adamhm
avatar
adamhm: I've put together a Wine wrapper for System Shock 2, allowing it to be played on Linux almost like a native game & with no Wine knowledge required. This game has had an official Linux release for a long time, but it's only available on Steam and unfortunately shows no signs of turning up here (plus the official release only uses a Wine wrapper anyway...)

Simply place the script, resource archive and installer files together in the same directory & run the script. The output is a directory containing a "GOG-style" ready-to-go Wine-wrapped version of the game (the build script also has the option to create a tarball of the assembled game package); from there installation is simply a case of moving the directory to wherever you want it installed to - then just run the start script to play, create a shortcut for the game, access the advanced options etc :)

(to uninstall simply delete the game directory and any shortcuts you created, and the game's user data directory in ~/.local/share if you don't want to keep your saves & settings)

Running the start script with the argument "play" will bypass the menu and start the game immediately (this is the default setting for shortcuts created by the script).

User saves are stored under ~/.local/share/sshock2

Full details are in the readme.txt and release notes. Here is the download link:

sshock2_wine.tar.xz
(9.3 kB, SHA256: cd466f5e69e2b86842defb4f05c53d2ecb1f5c636a065edf4a6a120c07999f03)

The wrapper uses Wine Staging 2.0 with CSMT enabled. Wine and Winetricks will be downloaded automatically if not present; to avoid redownloading for other scripts the downloaded Wine package will be stored in ~/.cache/winewrap

There shouldn't be any problems as I've previously done a complete playthrough of the game using an earlier version of Wine without issue and there's no reason to suspect this has changed. However if anyone does run into any problems then post in this thread and/or The "Judas™ does this run in Wine" thread v1.173.

Multiplayer has not been tested and may or may not work.

For more of my Linux Wine wrappers see my GOGmix: adamhm's Linux Wine wrappers
Even though the linux version that Valve sells is only a disguised Wine wrapper, it still shows that they are placing way more effort into bringing games to Linux out of the box.

This is not the first time GOG does that. I´m getting tired of complaining to gog support about their lack of willpower to bring the linux version of games to their store. While their competitor Steam continues to offer the same games that gog sells, plus with their linux ports and way more other games that run on linux.
I´m not a big fan of buying on steam, due to their DRM and the way Valve is becoming more like "EA" recently. However unfortunately I usually have to keep buying from them, due to the fact that they seem way more willing to bring Linux ports of games to their store. If you check out there are lots of games that both stores sell. However while GOG usually only sells the Windows and Mac counterparts of those games. Valve also sells the Linux versions.

I hope someday GOG will start treating Linux with more respect. Although GOG´s Free DRM proposal is way more interesting and better for us customers and the fact that they arent the "Cool Chad of High School" like Steam is now. As a consumer I´m forced to continue giving preference to Steam due to the fact that they offer way more games that run on Linux than GOG store.
Post edited May 28, 2017 by ToasterBox
I'm not sure why the Linux version of SS2 isn't here as it should be pretty trivial from a technical standpoint, but it's worth noting that the Linux version is not available via the Humble Store either. AFAIK CodeWeavers did the Linux release of System Shock 2; that may have something to do with it.

I agree that GOG could & should do more for Linux support, but to be fair it's not entirely down to them:

- Sometimes Linux versions aren't released here due to the publishers/developers not deeming it worthwhile to bring the Linux versions to GOG, because GOG is so much smaller than Steam and the sales figures here will be lower. Buying those games on Steam instead doesn't help things either. I very rarely buy Steam games, and even then it's only at a big discount/low price - usually as part of massively discounted Humble bundle purchases - and with the full intention to re-buy here if/when they get a GOG release, assuming that I like them. In addition, I never buy gift copies of games that use Steam, and don't tolerate any other DRM at all.

- Sometimes Linux versions aren't released here due to incompetence and/or laziness on the part of the developers.

- Sometimes Linux versions aren't released here because of the lack of a Galaxy client for Linux & unwillingness of the publisher/developer to release a version of the game without features that would depend on Galaxy such as achievements (this is in large part GOG's fault, although some blame also goes to the publishers/developers that put such high value on junk features like achievements that they'd rather withhold the release entirely)

- Sometimes Linux versions aren't released here because the rights are split between different developers and require more complex licensing arrangements. Or in the case of older games, the rights to the Linux ports may be in limbo & would require far too much effort & resources to sort out.

As well as contacting GOG you should also be contacting the publishers/developers of titles that have Linux versions elsewhere & asking them about bringing the Linux versions here. I've contacted a number of developers and publishers, and ran giveaways about this before with contact details for the publishers of some of the larger titles (e.g. this one I did at the start of the year).
Post edited May 28, 2017 by adamhm