}

It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer or Opera

×
arrow-down2arrowcart2close4fat-arrow-leftfat-arrow-rightfeedbackfriends2happy-facelogo-gognotificationnotifications-emptyownedremove-menusad-facesearch2wishlist-menuwishlisted2own_thingsheartstartick
Return to the surface, bit by bit.

Tangledeep, a dungeon-crawler RPG carrying all the charm of the 16-bit classics, is now available DRM-free on GOG.com, 10% off until February 8, 6PM UTC.
Where fearful villagers and simple folk won't venture, that's where you must go: Through Tangledeep, the perilous labyrinth that's been keeping people from reclaiming the lands above. Slay the monsters dwelling there, collect long-lost treasures, meet peculiar characters, and solve the mysteries of its constantly-shifting caverns.

Grab the soundtrack separately or together with the game for an additional 15% off.
avatar
mystral: But I do hate pixel art, and I think there's a sizable group that hate it too, they just don't speak up about it because they don't see the point.
More importantly, there's obviously an even larger group of people who do enjoy such games and spend money on them. Because, y'know, otherwise devs wouldn't bother to make more of them, and GOG wouldn't keep releasing them. As a business, I suspect they kinda like making a profit.
avatar
KasperHviid: It's sad they made permadeath optional. Such a cop-out. But it's great to finally see an "old school" rogue-clone here. That genre never really managed to catch on to the success of modern roguelikes. But maybe this one will?
Is there a reason not to have it as an option? It only benefits the developers by opening the game up to a wider audience.
avatar
aaversa: Hi all, I couldn't be happier with how Tangledeep turned out and I'm so proud of what we released today. If you check out the full game description right here on GOG I think the feature list does a pretty good job of what sets this game apart, but I'm happy to talk more about it as well.

...

The best I can say is that this game was made with love and passion. It's the dream project I've wanted to make my whole life and I've spent the last 2 years making it happen. I think you can see and hear that passion shine through if you play the game :-)
Sounds so awesome. Can't wait to play this when I have some spare cash to buy it.

Congratulations on finishing it too, are you the sole developer or did you work with a team?
This is an interesting one, really.
Looks quite nice to me .Music sounds awesome to my ears (GOG you need to find some way to let customers preview the tracks on your site... and not rely on people having to go to youtube or bandcamp to do that). Game sounds good dev. Wishlisted and thinking whether to buy it :D
avatar
CharlesGrey: More importantly, there's obviously an even larger group of people who do enjoy such games and spend money on them. Because, y'know, otherwise devs wouldn't bother to make more of them, and GOG wouldn't keep releasing them. As a business, I suspect they kinda like making a profit.
Maybe, although I have a hard time imagining that even the people who likes that type of games can buy them all. I mean, we typically get about 1 game like that a week. Is there really anyone who has the time or money to play them all?

Personally, I wouldn't be so confident about the typical developer's ability to judge the market and determine whether any given game will make a profit. My guess is that their reasoning is the same as yours, I.e. there wouldn't be so many of those games if they didn't succeed. The fact is, however, that it's a self-fulfilling prophecy; devs see many pixelated "roguelikes" being released, they think they must be successful and release their own, so that the next devs see many pixelated "roguelikes" being released, and so on.

The only way to tell whether these games are successful is to see just how many devs keep making that type of game versus how many just disappear or make something different, and I just can't be bothered to check, sorry.

As for GOG, I'm guessing it just doesn't take a whole lot of sales for a game to make them some profit, so they have no reason to reject even barely successful ones.
avatar
CharlesGrey: More importantly, there's obviously an even larger group of people who do enjoy such games and spend money on them. Because, y'know, otherwise devs wouldn't bother to make more of them, and GOG wouldn't keep releasing them. As a business, I suspect they kinda like making a profit.
avatar
mystral: Maybe, although I have a hard time imagining that even the people who likes that type of games can buy them all. I mean, we typically get about 1 game like that a week. Is there really anyone who has the time or money to play them all?
Not everyone will play all of them. Some of them are more appealing than others. I find this one to be particularly appealing.
Personally, I wouldn't be so confident about the typical developer's ability to judge the market and determine whether any given game will make a profit. My guess is that their reasoning is the same as yours, I.e. there wouldn't be so many of those games if they didn't succeed. The fact is, however, that it's a self-fulfilling prophecy; devs see many pixelated "roguelikes" being released, they think they must be successful and release their own, so that the next devs see many pixelated "roguelikes" being released, and so on.
Typically, you look for that shmuck who's making alot of money and see what he's doing. Most devs understand supply and demand, so they see a saturated market, they don't develop for it. The market is saturated, so they must know something we don't. The mobile games market is saturated, so i, too, thought that they wouldn't be making more shoddy mobile games. Then i saw my girlfriend's iPhone. Yeah, there's a market for shovelware. She's constantly alternating between 3 different match-3 games waiting for her energy to fill up, so they're making ad revenue on people that aren't buying energy. Funny thing, the 3 games are made by the same company, and they still make enough profit to keep churning them out. And, have you seen Huniepop's sales? A number of times it got on the top sellers list, here. It's the same thing without the fun of spending money on energy.
The only way to tell whether these games are successful is to see just how many devs keep making that type of game versus how many just disappear or make something different, and I just can't be bothered to check, sorry.
Have a girlfriend? Check her cellphone. If not, check your sister's. Your little brother's. Your mother's. Ask the hottest woman near you what she plays on her iPhone. It's quite depressing, but when you understand these games gear towards women (i actually have a video presentation of a game dev pointing this out), it makes sense. It just so turns out, that you aren't the pixelated game hog target group.

How old are you? Did you play games from the 80s and/or 90s? If not, you're obviously not the target group. Even if you are in the target group, you could be a failed hit. Frankly, i'm in the target group, and while most of them i won't even shake a stick at, this one looks entertaining when i saw the video instead of the screenshots. Whether or not i, still, buy it depends on whether or not it'll run reasonably well on my computer. My specs just barely match the minimum specs.
As for GOG, I'm guessing it just doesn't take a whole lot of sales for a game to make them some profit, so they have no reason to reject even barely successful ones.
Then why so many threads about games gog rejected?
high rated
avatar
CharlesGrey: More importantly, there's obviously an even larger group of people who do enjoy such games and spend money on them. Because, y'know, otherwise devs wouldn't bother to make more of them, and GOG wouldn't keep releasing them. As a business, I suspect they kinda like making a profit.
avatar
mystral: Maybe, although I have a hard time imagining that even the people who likes that type of games can buy them all. I mean, we typically get about 1 game like that a week. Is there really anyone who has the time or money to play them all?
What "type"? The last game that resembles Tangledeep was Tales of Maj'Eyal, in December 2012. I love Maj'Eyal and I still play it from time to time, but don't you think after five years of snow giant boulder throwers people might want an alternative?
avatar
kohlrak: I am considering this, but I only have 2GIGs of RAM, and a 1.2GHz dualcore processor. Looks fun, but I don't want another game that looks like a SNES game, but has more trouble running on my computer than skyrim. Worth my time?
Sometimes game developers will simply put up the specs they were able to test the game on. Barony for example should not work at all on my potato, yet it runs flawlessly. In the old days when game developers wanted you to buy their game they would put out a free demo for you to try. I miss those days.

avatar
pkk234: Is there a reason not to have it as an option? It only benefits the developers by opening the game up to a wider audience.
It all depends on how the game was designed. Take for example quest markers and "Batman vision": if the game is designed with those features in mind, then turning them off means you won't have any idea what to do or where to go. On the other hand, if the game was design without these features first, then there will be enough information and environmental hints for the player.

The original Rogue was designed with perma-death in mind, it was essentially as close to an arcade game as was possible for an RPG running on a Unix workstation. This led to a very distilled experience: no shops, no grinding, a time limit (hunger) and a very straight-forward path.
Anyone got any opinion on Heroic Mode versus Hardcore?

Heroic Mode lets you save banked goods and town progress and is "the intended way to experience Tangledeep"

Still, Hardcore sounds more pure somehow.
avatar
Breja: What? A pixelated rouglike? Why, I've never seen anything like this in my life! Incredible! Wait, does it mention 16 bit SNES era games to appeal to people's nostalgia? Who could possible have concived such unique a marketing ploy!
avatar
amok: then only thing getting more repetitive and tiresome then gOg's releases of pixelated roguelikes, is your comment on every single one of them.

edit: forgot to add the word tiresome, so I added "and tiresome". because, you know.... it is becoming rather tiresome. Yes we get, it is not your cup of tea. you made your point.... over and over and over and over and over again.... and then again.
Haven't you heard? If you can count the pixels it's TRASH. Sophisticated and classy people like Breja only play games with actual unique ART. Now THAT'S how you judge a game's merit. All you scrubs with terrible taste in video games will one day understand this one, once you get out of that filthy pixelart trash and into some artsy big boy pants.
Sounds like an interesting game!

A question: can I control it with keyboard only, without touching mouse at all?
avatar
Nightblair: Sounds like an interesting game!

A question: can I control it with keyboard only, without touching mouse at all?
I believe so...
high rated
avatar
mystral: But I do hate pixel art, and I think there's a sizable group that hate it too, they just don't speak up about it because they don't see the point.
avatar
CharlesGrey: More importantly, there's obviously an even larger group of people who do enjoy such games and spend money on them. Because, y'know, otherwise devs wouldn't bother to make more of them, and GOG wouldn't keep releasing them. As a business, I suspect they kinda like making a profit.
(replying to you, but intended for everyone.... sorry if you feel singled out, not intended).

What we need is JMich to create a new spreadsheet... I feel this is exactly the same as those that each week comes and shouts "WHY gOg NOT RELEASE OLD GEAMES ANYMORE!!1111!"

Looking at the "new" tab, we find:

Dungeons 3: once upon a time - not pixelated, not roguelike
Tangledeep - pixelated, roguelike
Ashes of singluarity DLC - not pixelated, not roguelike
Sherlock HolmesL TDD - not pixelated, not roguelike
Opus Magnum - not pixelated, not roguelike
Avernum 3 - pixelated, not roguelike
Way of the samurai 3 - not pixelated, not roguelike
Outcast: ST - not pixelated, not roguelike
Zwei: TAA - not pixelated, not roguelike
Legrand Legacy - not pixelated, not roguelike
Tokyo 42 - pixelated (? maybe?) - not rougelike
Iconoclasts - pixelated (gorgeous...) , not roguelike
Mad Games Tychoon - not pixelated, not roguelike
Offworld Trading Company DLC - not pixelated, not roguelike
Nantucket - not pixelated, not roguelike

So out of these 16 new releases, only 1 could be said to be a pixeleated rougelike, and only 4 use pixel graphics. so 6.25% and 25% respectively (or something like that...)
Post edited February 02, 2018 by amok
high rated
Absolutely. I personally play it with keyboard only, classic style with numpad (WASD is also an option). You can also play it with *only* mouse or *only* controller, or any combination.