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Ganni1987: It's kinda stupid to spend time and resources porting the game to 2 other platforms but releasing them only on 1 store.
Agreed, and especially since both THQ Nordic and Mimi didn't have problems releasing their games on GOG in the past.
In case you want to extract Konami's Collector's bundle, I made a helper script.
Post edited October 13, 2020 by shmerl
Posting this here regarding the recently released Amnesia: Rebirth

The game got released with a few issues but it's not unplayable. For Intel/AMD though, make sure to run the game with the 'export MESA_GL_VERSION_OVERRIDE=4.6COMPAT' env variable. I haven't got far in the game but it seems to be stable.

Unfortunately for Nvidia Linux users, the game is unplayable. The devs will be issuing a patch once they've tracked down the causes.
Post edited October 21, 2020 by Ganni1987
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Ganni1987: For Intel/AMD though, make sure to run the game with the 'export MESA_GL_VERSION_OVERRIDE=4.6COMPAT' env variable. I haven't got far in the game but it seems to be stable.
Why are they using compat profile in this day and age??
Post edited October 21, 2020 by shmerl
Hello, im fairly new to Linux and just tinkering about having fun :).

So i decided i wanted to try play witcher 3 and gwent.

Before going forward i have 3 drives on my pc, C D E.

I have windows but installed linux on a seperate partition on the E drive.

My GOG Galaxy 2.0 and games are installed on my D drive.

I installed lutris and located and manually added Witcher 3 and Gwent.

Both launch fine but no saves or cloud saves for Witcher 3 and cant login to gwent becuase of galaxy services.

I added GOG launcher as well but it will not launch. It will show as running on lutris and then just stop.

Is there a way to make the GOG launcher work from my D drive or do i have to install it from Lutris search.

If i have to install it , can i keep the GOG install to my Linux partition and not the my windows C drive.

I tried installing it but it will default into my C drive windows and not into my linux partition home/game path.

Thank you for any help, have a nice day or night
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Pixelizermon: Hello, im fairly new to Linux and just tinkering about having fun :).
Welcome!

1) Neither "Witcher 3", nor "Gwent" are available on Linux. So, if you are (first and foremost) interested in these products, it is preferable to use Windows instead in order to avoid any issues;

2) Linux does not use drive letters, so I'm quite confused about your partition setup. But from what I comprehend, you have "imported" your previous Windows "Witcher 3" install on the NTFS partition into "Lutris" (have never used this, but I assume it is just a launcher), trying to launch it on Linux via WINE. This will not work. Because not only NTFS is significantly slower (than it already is) on Linux due to userspace-level FUSE driver, but your actual Windows home directory ("My Documents" or something, it's been a while) does not correlate whth WINE-emulated environment, so your saves will not be available. And configuring WINE to use your NTFS Windows directory as a working directory is bad idea -- most probably you will corrupt your Windows installation at some point;

3) Using Linux partitions from Windows is not possible (by default, and I strongly recommend not to use 3rd-paty ext4 drivers like "ext2fsd", as there is a high chance to corrupt a filesystem completely).

In conclusion:
1) Given you choice in games, I recommend you to stick to Windows. It is ultimately up to you, though;

2) If you decided to ignore my advise #1 and continue venture into Linux, I advise you treat Linux as separate and completely unrelated OS. Trust me, all attempts to cross-use Windows and Linux partitions will either fail, or bring more harm than benefits. One should use dedicated Linux partitions with local installs of even Windows games. And in case of gamesaves, you shall locate them manually in your Windows install and copy into a Linux WINE prefix;

3) Be prepared that your Windows games will break on Linux (either due to addition of anti-cheat, or to WINE update regressions). This is normal and it is expected. Remember, you are not entitled any support for Windows games on WINE (or "Lutris", or "Proton", whatever -- it is the same thing under different names), so you should not bother game developers with your complains. That "system requirements" part on game pages is there for a purpose, and its voluntary breakage means contract terms violation, i. e. if you are using WINE => you are on your own;

4) Considering points #1 and #3, if you are still dedicated to Linux, it is best to avoid purchasing incompatible games from now on and concentrate exclusively on Linux-native ones. You will have superior performance and support from developers (and will support them in return for their Linux efforts). This is how it should be. If this is unacceptable for you (as you will miss on a lot of "AAA" titles), you can always consider #1. :)

Fave a nice time of the day!
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Pixelizermon: So i decided i wanted to try play witcher 3 and gwent.
I'd also recommend to avoid mixing Windows and Linux installations. You'll only get a lot of problems. Get a separate drive for each OS if you still need Windows. Or ditch Windows completely and switch to Linux proper.

I haven't tried Gwent, but TW3 works perfectly in Wine on Linux (you also need dxvk).
Post edited October 23, 2020 by shmerl
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Pixelizermon: Hello, im fairly new to Linux and just tinkering about having fun :).
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Alm888: Welcome!

1) Neither "Witcher 3", nor "Gwent" are available on Linux. So, if you are (first and foremost) interested in these products, it is preferable to use Windows instead in order to avoid any issues;

2) Linux does not use drive letters, so I'm quite confused about your partition setup. But from what I comprehend, you have "imported" your previous Windows "Witcher 3" install on the NTFS partition into "Lutris" (have never used this, but I assume it is just a launcher), trying to launch it on Linux via WINE. This will not work. Because not only NTFS is significantly slower (than it already is) on Linux due to userspace-level FUSE driver, but your actual Windows home directory ("My Documents" or something, it's been a while) does not correlate whth WINE-emulated environment, so your saves will not be available. And configuring WINE to use your NTFS Windows directory as a working directory is bad idea -- most probably you will corrupt your Windows installation at some point;

3) Using Linux partitions from Windows is not possible (by default, and I strongly recommend not to use 3rd-paty ext4 drivers like "ext2fsd", as there is a high chance to corrupt a filesystem completely).

In conclusion:
1) Given you choice in games, I recommend you to stick to Windows. It is ultimately up to you, though;

2) If you decided to ignore my advise #1 and continue venture into Linux, I advise you treat Linux as separate and completely unrelated OS. Trust me, all attempts to cross-use Windows and Linux partitions will either fail, or bring more harm than benefits. One should use dedicated Linux partitions with local installs of even Windows games. And in case of gamesaves, you shall locate them manually in your Windows install and copy into a Linux WINE prefix;

3) Be prepared that your Windows games will break on Linux (either due to addition of anti-cheat, or to WINE update regressions). This is normal and it is expected. Remember, you are not entitled any support for Windows games on WINE (or "Lutris", or "Proton", whatever -- it is the same thing under different names), so you should not bother game developers with your complains. That "system requirements" part on game pages is there for a purpose, and its voluntary breakage means contract terms violation, i. e. if you are using WINE => you are on your own;

4) Considering points #1 and #3, if you are still dedicated to Linux, it is best to avoid purchasing incompatible games from now on and concentrate exclusively on Linux-native ones. You will have superior performance and support from developers (and will support them in return for their Linux efforts). This is how it should be. If this is unacceptable for you (as you will miss on a lot of "AAA" titles), you can always consider #1. :)

Fave a nice time of the day!
I made a small partition on my 3rd drive that i mainly use for movies. I got 2 SSD which has windows and where my games are stored,

The hdd is 1.8 tb and i only partitioned like 75gb for linux.

Im just trying linux for fun and wanted to launch GOG galaxy in it.

Witcher 3 actually runs pretty fine. i did install dxvk though.

On my laptop i was able to install GOG Galaxy and launch it becuase it was pure linux partition.

I did a clean install of Kubuntu and installed lutris and was able to install GOG Galaxy as well and launch it via wine.
And was able to login Gwent and play a few rounds.

It made a fake windows x86 folder inside home/game.

Now on my desktop pc , i tried just adding .exe to lutris but it wont work.

I guess ill just have to do more digging or install like i did on my laptop.
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Pixelizermon: So i decided i wanted to try play witcher 3 and gwent.
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shmerl: I'd also recommend to avoid mixing Windows and Linux installations. You'll only get a lot of problems. Get a separate drive for each OS if you still need Windows. Or ditch Windows completely and switch to Linux proper.

I haven't tried Gwent, but TW3 works perfectly in Wine on Linux (you also need dxvk).
Yea i did play a bit of TW3 just couldnt get my save files from windows. As for Gwent, i did a clean install of Linux on my Laptop and install GOG Galaxy via Lutris and installed gwent via the GOG Client.
It worked i was able to play a few rounds.

So on my desktop i have Windows installed on my SSD and i have my games on my 2nd SSD,
Linux i have installed it on my HDD which i made a small partition on.
Should i just get a seperate drive for Linux still?
Post edited October 23, 2020 by Pixelizermon
BTW Galaxy is yet another thing not supported on linux (although initially there was linux version announced).

You are of course welcome to linux, and you are free to go against the wind if you want to, and people here will even try to help you as much as they can, but there are certain limits to what is possible, and if you keep insisting on going for unsupported SW and runtime conditions, you will hit lot more problems than people who just use native linux stuff.

It's "JFYI" as matter of fact, if you don't mind the extra hassle, then all is fine (I did uninstall wine about three years ago as it was clashing with my kernel version, which I did need updated for more stable WiFi driver... and generally I stopped bothering to try to run windows SW, there's ton of linux SW, which you can help to shape - if you are programmer, you can contribute to the source directly, or as regular user you can help with testing, bug reports and suggestions... Giving [all of] your attention and life-time to companies who don't care about linux is IMO a bit sad.

Hopefully you will find more fun than problems with linux, GL, HF. :)
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ped7g: BTW Galaxy is yet another thing not supported on linux (although initially there was linux version announced).

You are of course welcome to linux, and you are free to go against the wind if you want to, and people here will even try to help you as much as they can, but there are certain limits to what is possible, and if you keep insisting on going for unsupported SW and runtime conditions, you will hit lot more problems than people who just use native linux stuff.

It's "JFYI" as matter of fact, if you don't mind the extra hassle, then all is fine (I did uninstall wine about three years ago as it was clashing with my kernel version, which I did need updated for more stable WiFi driver... and generally I stopped bothering to try to run windows SW, there's ton of linux SW, which you can help to shape - if you are programmer, you can contribute to the source directly, or as regular user you can help with testing, bug reports and suggestions... Giving [all of] your attention and life-time to companies who don't care about linux is IMO a bit sad.

Hopefully you will find more fun than problems with linux, GL, HF. :)
Yea i wish the client was supported but cant have everything i guess =p.
Linux im just using it out of curiosity and to see how the performance of games are.
I doubt im going to be a super power user or anything as i just use pc for gaming. But it was fun installing linux and try to figure out stuff to work.
Post edited October 23, 2020 by Pixelizermon
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Pixelizermon: Now on my desktop pc , i tried just adding .exe to lutris but it wont work.
As I said, using a Windows NTFS partition in Linux is a bad idea. Consider those partitions to be like oversized flash drives. :)

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Pixelizermon: Yea i did play a bit of TW3 just couldnt get my save files from windows.
For savefile locations on Windows you may consider consulting PC Gaming Wiki.
[url=https://www.pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/The_Witcher_3:_Wild_Hunt]https://www.pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/The_Witcher_3:_Wild_Hunt[/url]

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Pixelizermon: So on my desktop i have Windows installed on my SSD and i have my games on my 2nd SSD,
Linux i have installed it on my HDD which i made a small partition on.
Should i just get a seperate drive for Linux still?
Yes.
The idea of just using existing NTFS partitions for Linux is a common novice pitfall. And while 75gb is more than enough for root partition ("/"), you shall probably add another separate partition for "/home" (because most probably you will reinstall your OS with clean formatting, and you do not want to either lose all your user data, or having "fun" temporary copying and rewriting gigabytes of your data).

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Pixelizermon: Yea i wish the client was supported but cant have everything i guess =p.
Linux im just using it out of curiosity and to see how the performance of games are.
Are we talking Windows games via WINE or Linux games? ;)
If it is the former, than you shall expect a performance loss (depends on a game in question), as a (not-)emulated game was not written with Linux tech in mind (OpenGL, threading model etc.).

If it is the later, you can expect Linux to be superior:
recent example.
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Pixelizermon: I doubt im going to be a super power user or anything as i just use pc for gaming. But it was fun installing linux and try to figure out stuff to work.
Yeah, many before were saying the same… :D
Post edited October 23, 2020 by Alm888
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RichardSmithe: I still don't understand why people still use Linux
I recommend you to try it yourself then. And what do you mean "still"? There is a constant influx of Linux users from former Windows and macOS ones. So not "still", but "already".
Post edited October 28, 2020 by shmerl
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shmerl: I recommend you to…
You should probably not waste your time on 3rd grade trolls. :)

As I said, using a Windows NTFS partition in Linux is a bad idea. Consider those partitions to be like oversized flash drives. :)
In 99% of times it will just work fine if we're talking about Windows games/software running in Wine etc.
Running Linux software or especially using NTFS for those Linux installations of Linux that can coexist with Windows is bad, even if games will usually work as well.

Are we talking Windows games via WINE or Linux games? ;)
If it is the former, than you shall expect a performance loss (depends on a game in question), as a (not-)emulated game was not written with Linux tech in mind (OpenGL, threading model etc.).
Things changed with DXVK as performance drop is waay lower now. At least for DX9 and DX11 games. DX12 support in Wine is kinda hit and miss still because it's quite early WIP.

In some cases games run faster or better than natively even. The main problem nowadays is kernel mode anticheats but those aren't the issue for GOG games.
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shmerl: I recommend you to…
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Alm888: You should probably not waste your time on 3rd grade trolls. :)
тролли вместо третьеклассников получились третьесортными. что тоже неплохо.