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HappyPunkPotato: From what I've read it seems that the GOG version comes with sfall and the high res patch.
There's even a Linux wrapper from adamhm available for the Fallout games if you do not want to bother with Wine yourself.
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Thanks for the description. I'd forgotten about all the fun of applying patches so the game wasn't psychedelic with the car boot following you round everywhere.
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eiii: There's even a Linux wrapper from adamhm available for the Fallout games if you do not want to bother with Wine yourself.
Thanks, that seems like something I should be able to try to start my WINE journey! No idea why I always think it looks so tricky and put off looking into it.
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eiii: There's even a Linux wrapper from adamhm available for the Fallout games if you do not want to bother with Wine yourself.
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HappyPunkPotato: Thanks, that seems like something I should be able to try to start my WINE journey! No idea why I always think it looks so tricky and put off looking into it.
It *is* a bit tricky, especially compared to regular packages installed from your distribution repository (in this regard even native linux installer downloaded from GOG is somewhat tricky, but at least I can easily install game binaries outside of my regular /usr/local/bin to the secondary HDD mounted in my /home folder, which is actually good bonus for my use-case).

The issue I have with wine is that often some game requires different set of extras than other, so using wine-prefix environments per-game is advised (doesn't even eat into disk space that quickly, each prefix is quite minimal while empty, not even near as bad as VM images with pre-allocated size).

And the second issue is, that by default wine is not sandbox, quite opposite, any exe by default in wine has good access to all your linux FS with the rights of your current user, i.e. it can for example delete your whole $HOME directory under normal circumstances (near impossible to happen by accident, but if somebody will give you malicious exe which will expect the wine environment, it can be done easily).

So my default config of wine locks these auto-mapped drives to everywhere, but that breaks many other helper scripts and common internet advice how-to, and I use wine so rarely, that I often forget how did I set it up, and how to use it in my current setup...

So after couple of years I started to avoid wine usage completely... :D But YMMV, there're are many other options, you can either ignore the (tiny) risk and keep using wine as is, or you can create different user account just for playing wine games (the new user can by default damage only his own $HOME, not your primary user), etc... depends how you use your machine, and how paranoid you are.

(one can also run whole another linux inside VM and inside that wine, to sandbox it, but then the question is why not to run whole windows inside VM, so this is whole idea is just joke)
Post edited January 16, 2020 by ped7g
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ped7g: there're are many other options, you can either ignore the (tiny) risk and keep using wine as is, or you can create different user account just for playing wine games (the new user can by default damage only his own $HOME, not your primary user), etc... depends how you use your machine, and how paranoid you are.

(one can also run whole another linux inside VM and inside that wine, to sandbox it, but then the question is why not to run whole windows inside VM, so this is whole idea is just joke)
This is another thing I can never decide on. If I'm going to have half of my games on a different user account then I may as well just install them on my old W7 laptop and save the trouble!
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ped7g: And the second issue is, that by default wine is not sandbox, quite opposite, any exe by default in wine has good access to all your linux FS with the rights of your current user, i.e. it can for example delete your whole $HOME directory under normal circumstances (near impossible to happen by accident, but if somebody will give you malicious exe which will expect the wine environment, it can be done easily).
The easiest way to prevent Wine from linking certain directories to your Linux home directory or assigning the Linux filesystem to a drive letter probably is to run "winetricks sandbox" in every new Wine prefix before using it.
Post edited January 18, 2020 by eiii
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ped7g: And the second issue is, that by default wine is not sandbox, quite opposite, any exe by default in wine has good access to all your linux FS with the rights of your current user, i.e. it can for example delete your whole $HOME directory under normal circumstances (near impossible to happen by accident, but if somebody will give you malicious exe which will expect the wine environment, it can be done easily).
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eiii: The easiest way to prevent Wine from linking certain directories to your Linux home directory or assigning the Linux filesystem to a drive letter probably is to run "winetricks sandbox" in every new Wine prefix before using it.
With that said, if you're *really* paranoid (for example, if you are investigating a file with a known virus or major security issue), and you don't need 3d stuff, you probably want to be using a virtual machine instead of relying on WINE to keep your system safe. (Also, in the known virus situation, you probably want to take other precautions, like removing all network access from the VM.)
Could someone explain to me how this page work??? When i buy a game, where does it goes?
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mthrin: Could someone explain to me how this page work??? When i buy a game, where does it goes?
Is this related to Linux?

It goes to your account from which you can download it either using the Galaxy client, NOT available on Linux, or from your library in your account from your web browser. Direct link: https://www.gog.com/account also accessible by hovering over your user name then clicking on 'games'. How to access them inside Galaxy I do not know but then you are not using Linux if you need to know that.

Remember that you do not get Steam keys when buying games here. You get GOG keys :-)

Welcome to GOG!
Post edited January 18, 2020 by Themken
I just ran sudo apt update & upgrade to my Linux Mint 19.3 XFCE system, and now the display is locked to 1024x768@76Hz. It doesn't let me change the resolution nor the refresh rate.

Checking the Driver Manager, it offers the closed-source NVidia-driver-390 and the open source noveau driver, but using either does not fix the problem. Before the update, I was using the closed source driver.

I tried to google but mainly saw discussions of someone having so new GPU that Mint didn't support it yet, but my GPU is an old NVidia Geforce 670M.

Any ideas what to try next?
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timppu: Any ideas what to try next?
Try other kernels, either newer (what I would try first) or older.

Also, a cold boot may help after an upgrade. Maybe that is only that a second reboot is what is helping, not sure.
Post edited January 20, 2020 by Themken
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Themken: Try other kernels, either newer (what I would try first) or older.
This is the newest (it came after I had upgraded and rebooted), and oddly the problem remained even if I booted into an earlier version. Then again, I don't consider booting to an earlier kernel really a solution because doesn't that mean I can never update the installation anymore?

Someone else had a similar problem but in his case his NVidia GPU was so new that it didn't have drivers yet, and fixed it by adding them manually or something. Anyways, when I run Driver Manager, it does have the NVidia drivers already installed, and also offers the open source drivers. Switching to them doesn't help either.

Could it be that it is my monitor (the laptop screen) that is now somehow fails to recognize? So I do have accelerated graphics drivers, but it doesn't let me set higher resolutions because it doesn't know what "monitor" it is? It only says "Default" in the Display properties, not sure what it said before.
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timppu:
I have had to skip some kernels every now and then and reverted to or installed a slightly older one when something broke after an update. IF you find out a kernel is bad for your computer, you can then block that exact version from being offered to you but the very next version will be offered again.

Yes, drivers... do you have the central graphics files added as PPAs so not to have to wait for Mint team to offer them a few years later.
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Themken: Yes, drivers... do you have the central graphics files added as PPAs so not to have to wait for Mint team to offer them a few years later.
Seems to be fixed for now.

It seems some packages or dependencies or whatever were broken. I don't know why it didn't report errors before, but at some point I started getting some errors and also Synaptic package manager reported of 3 broken installations (somehow related to nvidia).

I tried to clean the cache and sudo apt-get install -f but it didn't work and Synaptic couldn't fix it either but after one or two reboots and changing drivers to the open source nouveua drivers, "sudo apt autoremove" removed some nvidia stuff, and after a reboot, now I finally got the hires desktop back, and screen brightness controls work too (I had some issues with them before, the brightness would always be at full when I booted to Linux and had to manually lower the brightness; now it finally works fully ie. remembers the brightness setting after a reboot).

The Driver Manager still recommends me to switch to Nvidia 390 closed-source drivers, not sure if I dare to try them anymore or just stay with nouveau drivers. Yeah I know people say NVidia's own drivers are "much better" but for some reason I never saw any real difference, even with games (= playing Team Fortress 2 on Linux). They seemed to work the same to me.

Anyways...
Post edited January 21, 2020 by timppu
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timppu: Anyways...
:-) All good then :-)