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king_mosiah: Most of them, at any rate. AMD still requires firmware blobs.
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dtgreene: From a pragmatic sense (as opposed to a philosophical/ethical sense), a firmware blob is not nearly as bad as the nvidia situation.

With a firmware blob:
* The blob doesn't execute on the CPU, so it won't interefere with software running on the CPU.
* The code executing on the CPU is still GPL2, so there's no license issue with linking it into the kernel.
* The firmware blob doesn't need to use the kernel's internal API, and therefore doesn't need to be updated with each kernel version; furthermore, due to the fact that it doesn't need to link to the kernel. the CPU portion of the driver can be made entirely GPL2 and upstreamed.
* Another advantage, at least theoretically, it should be possible to use said driver with a non-x86 CPU (like ARM, MIPS, Power, RISC-V, and others).

Can't do any of that with nvidia's proprietary driver, which needs to run propoietary code on the CPU.
It's LESS bad than the complete black box we get with Nvidia, but it's still not idea, freedom-wise.
Post edited February 01, 2020 by king_mosiah
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dtgreene: From a pragmatic sense (as opposed to a philosophical/ethical sense), a firmware blob is not nearly as bad as the nvidia situation.

With a firmware blob:
* The blob doesn't execute on the CPU, so it won't interefere with software running on the CPU.
* The code executing on the CPU is still GPL2, so there's no license issue with linking it into the kernel.
* The firmware blob doesn't need to use the kernel's internal API, and therefore doesn't need to be updated with each kernel version; furthermore, due to the fact that it doesn't need to link to the kernel. the CPU portion of the driver can be made entirely GPL2 and upstreamed.
* Another advantage, at least theoretically, it should be possible to use said driver with a non-x86 CPU (like ARM, MIPS, Power, RISC-V, and others).

Can't do any of that with nvidia's proprietary driver, which needs to run propoietary code on the CPU.
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king_mosiah: It's LESS bad than the complete black box we get with Nvidia, but it's still not idea, freedom-wise.
Would it be more or less ideal if, instead of requiring the firmware blob to be uploaded by the kernel at boot time, the blob was burned into the video card's ROM and not upgradable or accessible by the host CPU?

Edit: I assume you meant to say "ideal" instead of "idea" and somehow failed to type the 'l', correct?
Post edited February 01, 2020 by dtgreene
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king_mosiah: It's LESS bad than the complete black box we get with Nvidia, but it's still not idea, freedom-wise.
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dtgreene: Would it be more or less ideal if, instead of requiring the firmware blob to be uploaded by the kernel at boot time, the blob was burned into the video card's ROM and not upgradable or accessible by the host CPU?

Edit: I assume you meant to say "ideal" instead of "idea" and somehow failed to type the 'l', correct?
It would be better for the firmware to be open. Also, are you the type that feels compelled to peck and poke at every typo and missing comma?
Post edited February 01, 2020 by king_mosiah
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dtgreene: Would it be more or less ideal if, instead of requiring the firmware blob to be uploaded by the kernel at boot time, the blob was burned into the video card's ROM and not upgradable or accessible by the host CPU?

Edit: I assume you meant to say "ideal" instead of "idea" and somehow failed to type the 'l', correct?
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king_mosiah: It would be better for the firmware to be open. Also, are you the type that feels compelled to peck and poke at every typo and missing comma?
Yes, from a freedom perspective open would be ideal, but the question I asked is which of the two alternatives I mentioned would be preferable if it had to be one of them.

Also, I mention the mistake in your post because I happened to be making another comment on your post anyway, and in this case the typo happened to form another English word, which could create confusion.
Actually, what graphical environment (desktop environment) would you recommend for a computer if:
* There is no mouse (and no touchscreen or touchpad, either), and
* The keyboard lacks a numeric keypad?
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dtgreene: Actually, what graphical environment (desktop environment) would you recommend for a computer if:
* There is no mouse (and no touchscreen or touchpad, either), and
* The keyboard lacks a numeric keypad?
i3

Technically not a DE, but this seems like a case for a tiling WM.
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dtgreene: Actually, what graphical environment (desktop environment) would you recommend for a computer if:
* There is no mouse (and no touchscreen or touchpad, either), and
* The keyboard lacks a numeric keypad?
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lolplatypus: i3

Technically not a DE, but this seems like a case for a tiling WM.
So, with respect toi i3, a couple questions before I try it:
* Is there a list of keyboard shortcuts to get me started?
* Will i3 run fine on an armv6 machine with 512MB ram? (In other words, will it run fine on the original Raspberry Pi?)

Also, I have come up with another question, unrelated to the one I just asked:
* Is there any reason to use LVM thin provisioning when I could just use image files on an XFS partition? (Before you mention snapshots as a reason, note that XFS has reflinks these days, which serve the same function in this situation.)
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dtgreene: So, with respect toi i3, a couple questions before I try it:
* Is there a list of keyboard shortcuts to get me started?
Here's the reference card.
The userguide is worth a look, too, and shortcuts can be configured in a config file.

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dtgreene: * Will i3 run fine on an armv6 machine with 512MB ram? (In other words, will it run fine on the original Raspberry Pi?)
I've never used a Raspberry Pi and don't know how you'd optimally set one up for a given task, so the honest answer here would be: no clue.

That said, it is essentially just a window manager and htop is giving me 14.4MB resident memory usage for the process. For reference, my system is sitting at 220MB after booting up, which includes things like compton and the gnome terminal server, so you could probably bring that number down even more.
One more question:
* I copied some .ogg files (originally ripped from an audio CD) to my android phone, and they appear as "Unknown Album". How could I tag them so that they appear as something more meaningful? I would like a command line solution so that I can script it.
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dtgreene: One more question:
* I copied some .ogg files (originally ripped from an audio CD) to my android phone, and they appear as "Unknown Album". How could I tag them so that they appear as something more meaningful? I would like a command line solution so that I can script it.
Try "EasyTAG". It probably should be available from default repositories. Not a command line though.
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dtgreene: One more question:
* I copied some .ogg files (originally ripped from an audio CD) to my android phone, and they appear as "Unknown Album". How could I tag them so that they appear as something more meaningful? I would like a command line solution so that I can script it.
You can use vorbiscomment from vorbis-tools
vorbiscomment -a inputfile.ogg -t "ALBUM=Album name here"
Can someone help me with this? (Torchlight 2 Linux stuttering): https://www.gog.com/forum/torchlight_series/torchlight_2_linux_stuttering
We Happy Few for Linux is out on GOG!
Just curious, does anyone know what this is? From the Linux version of Stardew Valley.

$ ldd libGalaxyPeer64.so
linux-vdso.so.1 (0x00007ffe9bf10000)
libpthread.so.0 => /usr/lib/libpthread.so.0 (0x00007fe847306000)
librt.so.1 => /usr/lib/librt.so.1 (0x00007fe8472fb000)
libdl.so.2 => /usr/lib/libdl.so.2 (0x00007fe8472f6000)
libstdc++.so.6 => /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6 (0x00007fe84710d000)
libm.so.6 => /usr/lib/libm.so.6 (0x00007fe846fc7000)
libgcc_s.so.1 => /usr/lib/libgcc_s.so.1 (0x00007fe846fad000)
libc.so.6 => /usr/lib/libc.so.6 (0x00007fe846de5000)
/usr/lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00007fe8481f0000)
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hollunder: Just curious, does anyone know what this is? From the Linux version of Stardew Valley.

$ ldd libGalaxyPeer64.so
Maybe, that custom thingy providing network multiplayer support for Linux. AFAIK, it is strictly "Stardew Valley"-specific.