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AnimalMother117: First, I thought that CoD: World at War (pretty much the newest CoD I want on PC) didn't have DRM, but some reviewers were mentioning that it required Punkbusters... I think... anyway, all I wanna do is play single player if I come across a cheap copy.
PunkBuster is an anti-cheat tool for multiplayer. It is not DRM and has no effect on single player. You can usually uninstall it after a game installs it (or cancel the installation prompt if it offers one) and then use single player without further nagging.

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AnimalMother117: I was on SecuRom's website and they said that they supported Medieval II. I thought they were talking about the X-pack only, but while doing a search on my PC I did find something about Far Cry 2 (weird in the sense that it was the only version I own, which is my GOG one). This one I'm fairly certain is nothing, but if anyone could put paranoia to rest, that'd be cool.
Many games have widely varying DRM across various regions and re-releases. Having a game listed on a DRM website does not necessarily mean all retail releases of that game use that DRM (or even any DRM at all).

DRM-free versions will sometimes write registry keys that mention a DRM by name but are not actually DRM data. This was sometimes done for purposes like showing custom-themed messages for protection errors. Similarly, some games include a fake version of some EXE or DLL that the game called for at some point. Several GOG games have such harmless remnants.
Post edited February 24, 2015 by Arkose
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AnimalMother117: First, I thought that CoD: World at War (pretty much the newest CoD I want on PC) didn't have DRM, but some reviewers were mentioning that it required Punkbusters... I think... anyway, all I wanna do is play single player if I come across a cheap copy.
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Arkose: PunkBuster is an anti-cheat tool for multiplayer. It is not DRM and has no effect on single player. You can usually uninstall it after a game installs it (or cancel the installation prompt if it offers one) and then use single player without further nagging.

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AnimalMother117: I was on SecuRom's website and they said that they supported Medieval II. I thought they were talking about the X-pack only, but while doing a search on my PC I did find something about Far Cry 2 (weird in the sense that it was the only version I own, which is my GOG one). This one I'm fairly certain is nothing, but if anyone could put paranoia to rest, that'd be cool.
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Arkose: Many games have widely varying DRM across various regions and re-releases. Having a game listed on a DRM website does not necessarily mean all retail releases of that game use that DRM (or even any DRM at all).

DRM-free versions will sometimes write registry keys that mention a DRM by name but are not actually DRM data. This was sometimes done for purposes like showing custom-themed messages for protection errors. Similarly, some games include a fake version of some EXE or DLL that the game called for at some point. Several GOG games have such harmless remnants.
Cool, thanks a lot.
Hello, would anyone mind answering another question for me?

This game came out before 2008 but I can't think of another thread to ask these questions. I played a bunch of Men of War lately and looked into Company of Heroes and got some conflicting messages about its DRM. PC gaming Wiki seemed to indicate it was just a disk check, or that it was nothing up to a certain version. Some guys on Relic's forums were indicating it had no DRM whatsoever, and then some guys indicated it was a simple disc check through Securom. Would anyone who either owns this game or knows definitively be so kind as to help me on this?

Other reason I had concern was that the Dawn of War games that Relic made seemed to conclusively use Securom. Which was too bad as I wanted those games.
Post edited October 25, 2015 by AnimalMother117
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fronzelneekburm: Anyway, here's how it works:

- Unplug your internet.
- Install Hard Reset
- Upon launching the game, the Kalypso launcher will make a sad face "Y U NO haz interwebz?!"
- Laugh in that fucker's face while you type in the CD-key from the back of your manual
- Start the game
Theoretically, you can:
- use Wireshark to detect which sites the launcher tries to connect to
- add this sites to /etc/hosts with 127.0.0.1, thus blanking them as local on your machine
Enjoy. Yes, its DRM, a permissive one.
nodrm would be no such logic so-ever.
Well, not sure if this game fits the list or not, but despite Street Fighter IV having Games for Windows - LIVE, you can still install it and play it offline with an offline/local account. Its the retail and vanilla edition.