It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like:Chrome,Firefox,Internet Explorer orOpera

×
75-90% off Duke Nukem 1+2, Duke Nukem 3D, Balls of Steel, Manhattan Project.

The Duke. Men want to be him, women want to be with him. The manliest of men, the ultimate male role model. He's been kicking ass on GOG.com for years, but on December 31 2015, Duke has to step out to get more bubble gum. On that day, all Duke Nukem games on GOG.com will be removed from our catalog, but we are in talks with the new rightsholders to bring them back as swiftly as possible. That's why we bid you a farewell for now, Duke: with every Duke Nukem game at 90% off as a bundle, or -75% individually.




The Duke's humble beginnings lie with Duke Nukem 1 + 2, two explosively cool run-n-gun platformers where Duke kicks his very first alien ass, travels in time, and authors "Why I'm SO Great" - a retrospective and autobiography. All in the year 1997, a dystopian near-future.

Years later, on January 29, 1996, our time: Duke makes history. Total meltdown follows the release of Duke Nukem 3D in which we finally see the world through the man's eyes. It's a world of pornography, violence, and candid obscenity. Duke's world. And we are entranced. By the campy risque, and by the unadulterated joy of Duke's violent adventures and one-liners.

Then, for years Duke rides the hype-train: in 1997, we behold his Balls of Steel - a pinball game warmly welcomed for its smooth, realistic physics and plenty of Duke on the side. In the year 2002, Duke goes back to basics in Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project, a modern 3D sidescrolling platformer that's nothing if not a fun and mindless pleasure.




This is not where the Duke Nukem legacy ends, but it is where we part ways - for now. So Farewell, Duke! The sale will last until December 31, 10:59 AM GMT. The games will be removed from sale soon thereafter, but they will not disappear from your shelf if you're an owner.
Come get some.







Last chance to get Dragonsphere for free.
With the start of the new year, Dragonshpere will no longer be a free game on GOG.com due to new publisher agreements. If you haven't claimed a copy for yourself, make sure to do so by December 31, 22:59 PM GMT - afterwards the game will be regularly priced at $5.99.

If you haven't yet, you can also check out our catalog of gaming freebies, where you'll find classics like Beneath a Steel Sky, Biomenace, Ultima IV and ten more!
avatar
mobutu: I was just installing Clive Barker's Undying when I noticed this ... is the DUKE back? :)
I'm pretty sure he'll be back (very?) soon, now that the new IP holder (Gearbox) is on GOG.com!
avatar
Geralt_of_Rivia: The ads in the installers aren't pulled live from the internet. They are fixed inside the installers. So it's not uncommon to see ads for games that have been removed inside old installers and that means nothing at all.

Though I would also bet on the Duke returning eventually. Always bet on Duke. ;-)
Same for new installers.
I installed Hard Reset Redux other night & it advertised ARMA II Combined Operations & that hasn`t been here for a long time now :(
avatar
fishbaits: Same for new installers.
I installed Hard Reset Redux other night & it advertised ARMA II Combined Operations & that hasn`t been here for a long time now :(
The games advertised during install are actually stored in the installer itself, so they will naturally get outdated over time unless GOG issues new updates of the installer. They're unlikely to issue new installers just to update the installer advertisements however.
avatar
skeletonbow: The games advertised during install are actually stored in the installer itself, so they will naturally get outdated over time unless GOG issues new updates of the installer. They're unlikely to issue new installers just to update the installer advertisements however.
True, but it's still absurd they haven't taken the time to update that mix for new installers.
avatar
Smannesman: True, but it's still absurd they haven't taken the time to update that mix for new installers.
Yeah, it's totally something automatable too. I'm big on that.
avatar
skeletonbow: Yeah, it's totally something automatable too. I'm big on that.
Yes. Everybody is. At least if you don't work for GOG. ;-)
Post edited July 22, 2016 by mk47at
avatar
mk47at: Yes. Everybody is. At least if you don't work for GOG. ;-)
LOL

Sadly, that's more common than not in software development shops I find. In former software engineering positions I held I found a common recurring theme. Whenever I would identify tedious repetitive work routines and suggest that either it could be automated or that I could automate it and suggest I do the automation, I would routinely get shut down by a manager. It seems that management sees automation as a waste of resources which seems as stupid as possible to me personally. So they would never give me the green light to spend work time writing scripts etc. to automate tedious repetitive tasks either for myself, our entire team, or for the entire business. This always baffled my mind as the few hours or few days worth of work that would need to be put into it up front would save endless hours of labour over the long haul, and the majority of them would pay for themselves in a few days to weeks of use - usually in a few days.

This really irritated the F**K out of me. So, I did what any sensible person would do. I did my job as expected during work hours, and during my personal hours after work where I get to decide what to do - I went ahead and wrote scripts to automate my job. Since my employer was opposed to giving me on-pay time to do this, I considered it to be tools of my own creation and for my own benefit. So instead of working for hours doing tedious shit all day every day, I would sometimes work all day and get 2/4/10 times as much stuff done, while other days I would work 1/10th as much and get the same amount of work done then spend the rest of the time doing things for myself. I never shared my scripts because they didn't pay me to write them.

It worked out great. I had both great productivity, and lots more free time combined.

I bet there are a lot of people out there that do this though when their employer is braindead about automating things that are trivial to automate and that the effort pays off quickly. I read not long ago about some guy that completely automated his job on Slashdot or similar, and worked for years like that, going into work and running scripts then playing video games etc. LOL He eventually got caught and fired, but really if he was putting out the expected productivity output then they really lost a good employee if you ask me. If they were smart they would have given him a raise then officially got him to automate everything they could. :)

I don't think he worked at GOG though LOL

Here's the news article on that guy: http://www.businessinsider.com/programmer-automates-his-job-2015-11

Pretty funny. I didn't take things that far. :)

http://interestingengineering.com/programmer-automates-job-6-years-boss-fires-finds/
Post edited July 22, 2016 by skeletonbow
avatar
skeletonbow:
Funny stories, but I'm not convinced that they are true.

Repetitive tasks are a huge problem; it's hard to keep your concentration up all the time.

I've had to copy 8 values each from many files into a huge spreadsheet a few weeks ago. I did the first batch by hand because I had convinced myself that writing a parser would be a waste of time – after five files I was really annoyed, but I continued working. After I've finished all 24 files (at that time) I had to take a nap and still was not convinced that I didn't make a mistake picking the correct value, rounding by hand and changing the decimal mark from dot to comma.

Afterwards I wrote a python script that uses many REs to scan the text files and produces a semicolon separated table that can be inserted into the spreadsheet. It also displays warnings if finds warning messages while scanning the text files. And on top of that it generates a statistic with mean and standard deviation of some important data.

Never do anything repetitive by hand that can be automated.
avatar
mk47at: Funny stories, but I'm not convinced that they are true.

Repetitive tasks are a huge problem; it's hard to keep your concentration up all the time.

I've had to copy 8 values each from many files into a huge spreadsheet a few weeks ago. I did the first batch by hand because I had convinced myself that writing a parser would be a waste of time – after five files I was really annoyed, but I continued working. After I've finished all 24 files (at that time) I had to take a nap and still was not convinced that I didn't make a mistake picking the correct value, rounding by hand and changing the decimal mark from dot to comma.

Afterwards I wrote a python script that uses many REs to scan the text files and produces a semicolon separated table that can be inserted into the spreadsheet. It also displays warnings if finds warning messages while scanning the text files. And on top of that it generates a statistic with mean and standard deviation of some important data.

Never do anything repetitive by hand that can be automated.
Can't be certain of course, it was just in the news so I took it at face value.

For myself, I just automated everything that involved tedious repetition at the commandline combined with lengthy waits for jobs to complete etc. Everything in bash, perl or python. The thing is, for me - I couldn't imagine why anyone wouldn't have done the same thing, it just seemed so obvious to me.
avatar
fishbaits: Same for new installers.
I installed Hard Reset Redux other night & it advertised ARMA II Combined Operations & that hasn`t been here for a long time now :(
avatar
skeletonbow: The games advertised during install are actually stored in the installer itself, so they will naturally get outdated over time unless GOG issues new updates of the installer. They're unlikely to issue new installers just to update the installer advertisements however.
Slight problem with that though.
There were some new released games that also had the ARMAII images in the installer too.
Guess they just forgot to check through their images or something ;)
avatar
skeletonbow: The thing is, for me - I couldn't imagine why anyone wouldn't have done the same thing, it just seemed so obvious to me.
Same here. Although I've never had that problem at work because my bosses have been (luckily) reasonable guys, I keep writing small programs for personal use. Sometimes somebody will see one of them and go "wow, that's cool but it must be a lot of work". My answer is always that actually I do it because I'm lazy and I don't want to do something that a program can do for me, and I think what *they* are doing by hand is a lot of work, and why they keep doing it.

By the way, last chance to get Dragonsphere free, yoo-hoo! \o/ :-D
avatar
nepundo: Same here. Although I've never had that problem at work because my bosses have been (luckily) reasonable guys, I keep writing small programs for personal use. Sometimes somebody will see one of them and go "wow, that's cool but it must be a lot of work". My answer is always that actually I do it because I'm lazy and I don't want to do something that a program can do for me, and I think what *they* are doing by hand is a lot of work, and why they keep doing it.
Yeah, that's pretty much exactly what I end up thinking. I observe the task N times where N is noticeably repetitious and then consider how much time it takes to task, estimate how much time it would take to automate then double it. If it's a task that's only going to be done a few times then it is less likely to be worthwhile to automate, but if it is something done regularly - once per week/day/hour or more often either by myself or by several people and the automation overhead will pay off in reasonable time - which it always does, then it's just a no brainer for me. Obviously if you have urgent work to do or high priority stuff to do then that needs to take focus, but when the higher priorities are clear then automation of tedium like this just makes sense. On the contrast however, I think that managers often for whatever reason either just can't see the value out of blindness, or they think it's going to hijack higher priorities and defocus. It may be a concern for someone who doesn't produce regular efficient work, but it's micromanaging to those that do.