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Cyberpunk 2077 is coming to GOG.COM on April 16th, 2020 and is now available for pre-orders.

The game will come with a soundtrack, a digital booklet with art from the game, Cyberpunk 2020 sourcebook, and wallpapers for desktop and mobile. GOG.COM users will also receive a set of exclusive goodies when the game is released: a digital booklet about the game (more details soon), an additional set of wallpapers and avatars, and print quality Cyberpunk 2077 posters.

Pre-order Cyberpunk 2077 before June 17th to receive a special 30% off discount for the official CD PROJEKT RED merch store*.

Cyberpunk 2077 is an open-world, action-adventure story set in Night City, a megalopolis obsessed with power, glamour and body modification. You play as V, a mercenary outlaw going after a one-of-a-kind implant that is the key to immortality. You can customize your character’s cyberware, skillset and playstyle, and explore a vast city where the choices you make shape the story and the world around you.

When buying Cyberpunk 2077 on GOG.COM, 100% of your money goes to CD PROJEKT Group.

*One-time discount is valid only for Cyberpunk 2077 pre-orders made on GOG.COM before June 17th, 2019, 10 PM UTC, and applies to items available in the official CD PROJEKT RED merchandise store, excluding figurines and products already on discount. Regional restrictions apply. See our Support page for more details.
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Genocide2099: Is there going to be a physical copy of the standard edition that has a GoG key?
All physical PC editions - be it Standard or Collector's - come with a GoG key.
Post edited June 18, 2019 by Swedrami
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Genocide2099: Is there going to be a physical copy of the standard edition that has a GoG key?
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Swedrami: All physical PC editions - be it Standard or Collector's - come with a GoG key.
I wonder if it would be possible to buy it in a metal case with a disk at the Cdpr online store in North America in the future?
Post edited June 18, 2019 by novumZ
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toxicTom: What DRM does not affect the paying customer? The whole thing about DRM is that pirates essentially get the better product...
I should have said does 'not affect the paying customer much'. The magnitude of effect is of course up for debate. Pirates usually don't get the better product as they don't usually get updates and they are more likely to contract malware. The way games did it back in the day was to have a cd-key that would be part of the installation process. This was used in Warcraft 3 and I don't think it's that bad. Other than the one time annoyance of entering the CD-Key and possibility of losing it, this particular process did not affect the game in any way. In contrast, nowadays we have the likes of Denuvo which slows down your PC while playing the game to a very significant extent. This is when DRM becomes a problem, in my opinion.

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toxicTom: If I'm forced to do this, it's kind of DRM. WC3 would be perfectly playable in LAN without any internet connection. Matchmaking can be an optional service for internet players.
WC3 was actually playable without an internet connection on LAN. The only thing that required registration was access to battle.net which allowed players to search for games and provided a place for people to host games. I think battle.net was also required to play online with your friends. So yes, matchmaking was an optional service in this case but WC3 was never designed to be a game primarily made around matchmaking, whereas GWENT is.

I am all for games being designed to be playable after their online services are shut down. I just find that this does not necessarily conflict with games having DRM.
Post edited June 18, 2019 by capt.k
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Lifthrasil: GOG used to offer only truly DRM-free games and in the past they even rejected games because they tried to enforce the use of a third-party registration. But then they watered down their stance on that and then came Gwent and DRM-ed multiplayer games became the norm. Because yes, for Gwent DRM was necessary, because it is based on micro-transactions and GOG needs a way to track those. After that there was no basis for rejecting multiplayer DRM anymore and many younger or uneducated players even believe that DRM is strictly necessary for multiplayer. But yes, I am sad that GOG ditched the standards that they used to stand for. I think that each GOG multiplayer game should also offer LAN and/or a dedicated server option. But unfortunately I am in a minority even here on GOG with that view. Everyone else seems to gobble up that 'It's multiplayer so it's not really DRM' myth.
If you can still play the SP it's not DRM....DRM would be if the entire game was locked with some sort of system.

Heck, if a game had servers that weren't locked/needed registration and they all went down...would you consider that DRM as well?

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capt.k: And to further my point about 'nobody had a problem with DRM until it started becoming intrusive' ('nobody' is used as a hyperbole here so you get no points), DRM is not necessarily a bad thing. I'm all for companies protecting their intellectual property and sales to the point where it doesn't affect the paying customer.
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toxicTom: What DRM does not affect the paying customer? The whole thing about DRM is that pirates essentially get the better product...
What about old school code wheels/books?
Post edited June 18, 2019 by GameRager
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GameRager: Heck, if a game had servers that weren't locked/needed registration and they all went down...would you consider that DRM as well?
Not if I can set up my own server or play in a LAN. It's easy, really. Digital restriction of use = DRM. No restriction of use = DRM-free.
low rated
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toxicTom: What DRM does not affect the paying customer? The whole thing about DRM is that pirates essentially get the better product...
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capt.k: I should have said does 'not affect the paying customer much'. The magnitude of effect is of course up for debate. Pirates usually don't get the better product as they don't usually get updates and they are more likely to contract malware. The way games did it back in the day was to have a cd-key that would be part of the installation process. This was used in Warcraft 3 and I don't think it's that bad. Other than the one time annoyance of entering the CD-Key and possibility of losing it, this particular process did not affect the game in any way. In contrast, nowadays we have the likes of Denuvo which slows down your PC while playing the game to a very significant extent. This is when DRM becomes a problem, in my opinion.
Yes CD keys are also "acceptable DRM" in my opinion.

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GameRager: Heck, if a game had servers that weren't locked/needed registration and they all went down...would you consider that DRM as well?
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Lifthrasil: Not if I can set up my own server or play in a LAN. It's easy, really. Digital restriction of use = DRM. No restriction of use = DRM-free.
Sounds fair, but as some here have said not all DRM is bad. Cd Keys/code wheels/etc many didn't have issue with and are non-intrusive.
Post edited June 18, 2019 by GameRager
The regional price for Argentina was 28.99U$D and now is 49.99U$D...
Why?
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GameRager: What about old school code wheels/books?
Dial-a-Pirate is certainly fun... But when I think about Frontier - Elite 2 where the German version code challenge asked for the wrong paragraphs from the manual...

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GameRager: Yes CD keys are also "acceptable DRM" in my opinion.
Except when - like in my case of Quake 3 Gold, they forgot to include the code (for Team Arena, base game code was there...).
Also you really need to make backups of the codes too. Many are printed in a way that fades over time or gets "rubbed off".

And the availability of key-gens lead to "key already in use" several times when joining a server back in the day - although I definitely had the genuine copy of the game.
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GameRager: What about old school code wheels/books?
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toxicTom: Dial-a-Pirate is certainly fun... But when I think about Frontier - Elite 2 where the German version code challenge asked for the wrong paragraphs from the manual...

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GameRager: Yes CD keys are also "acceptable DRM" in my opinion.
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toxicTom: Except when - like in my case of Quake 3 Gold, they forgot to include the code (for Team Arena, base game code was there...).
Also you really need to make backups of the codes too. Many are printed in a way that fades over time or gets "rubbed off".

And the availability of key-gens lead to "key already in use" several times when joining a server back in the day - although I definitely had the genuine copy of the game.
1. True, but i'm guessing that is rare?

2. These things happen, but at least they are usually down to a manufacturing/packaging error or customer error and can easily(usually) be rectified moreso than with more intrusive/bad DRM.
Apparently, Cyberpunk's pre-order availability is making a lot of people "move" to Russia. I wonder how does that affect GOG and CDPR in terms of earnings.
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Punington: Apparently, Cyberpunk's pre-order availability is making a lot of people "move" to Russia. I wonder how does that affect GOG and CDPR in terms of earnings.
You mean by using VPN and purchasing through Russia's servers?
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Punington: Apparently, Cyberpunk's pre-order availability is making a lot of people "move" to Russia. I wonder how does that affect GOG and CDPR in terms of earnings.
Not sure if I can follow, how does "moving" to Russia correlate with the availability of Cyberpunk 2077's pre-order?
Is this something about getting it for a couple rubles cheaper if you go the VPN route? What pre-order exactly? The physical or the digital one?
Some context would be nice.
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novumZ: You mean by using VPN and purchasing through Russia's servers?
Yep

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Swedrami: Not sure if I can follow, how does "moving" to Russia correlate with the availability of Cyberpunk 2077's pre-order?
Is this something about getting it for a couple rubles cheaper if you go the VPN route? What pre-order exactly? The physical or the digital one?
Some context would be nice.
Sorry about the vagueness of my comment, I didn't want to be explicit in order to not give nor spread any relatively unethical ideas. But yeah, I'm glad you got what I was referring to.
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novumZ: You mean by using VPN and purchasing through Russia's servers?
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Punington: Yep

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Swedrami: Not sure if I can follow, how does "moving" to Russia correlate with the availability of Cyberpunk 2077's pre-order?
Is this something about getting it for a couple rubles cheaper if you go the VPN route? What pre-order exactly? The physical or the digital one?
Some context would be nice.
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Punington: Sorry about the vagueness of my comment, I didn't want to be explicit in order to not give nor spread any relatively unethical ideas. But yeah, I'm glad you got what I was referring to.
Thanks for the clarification.
It's just what it is then, and I could imagine CDPR not losing that much sleep over it too. We have yet to see some concrete numbers (which CDPR might publish at one point themselves if pre-orders reach a new record percentage or something) but with the lion's share of pre-orders likely being made through GoG CDPR at least gets 100% of the sales price which in total could be more than enough to make up for any losses because of different pricings.

Well, technically not exactly if the purchase is made through GoG via the VPN-route. Still a win for GoG though, albeit not a monetary one.
Post edited June 23, 2019 by Swedrami
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Punington: Apparently, Cyberpunk's pre-order availability is making a lot of people "move" to Russia. I wonder how does that affect GOG and CDPR in terms of earnings.
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novumZ: You mean by using VPN and purchasing through Russia's servers?
Naw...they're all actually moving to that cold cold country with it's bears on unicycles.

I'm being silly, though....yes of course what you said.