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amok: Why?

edit: Lets take KSP. There is at least 12 people working on that team. it has been in development since 2011, that's 4 years, so you need to pay 12 people 4 year salaries. Lets say they get $10.000 a year? thats under minimum wage, I think.... but any way.... that makes it 12*4*10.000 = $600000. Selling at $30 a pop means they need to sell 20.000 copies just to get the cost of the salaries recuperated. We are now not even talking about other cost such as renting space, getting equipment and software. And it is way bellow minimal wage... not to mention legal costs...
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nightcraw1er.488: But, taking that example, a quick search roughly shows that there are over 1m copies of KSP sold via steam, so at that rate $30 = $30m, ok, there are obviously costs, taxes and what not to take out of it, but a nice little earner really.

If your happy to pay the increasing prices then fine. Me I am not that rich.
Many of those purchases were made during the early access phase, when the game was cheaper (I bough it for something like 20$, and I think there were some promo that went lower during that time period)

And sincerely, I enjoyed this game much more (and much longer) than many AAA 50+$ games I have in my library, like Far Cry 3, so I don't feel ripped off fater buying it AGAIN here at launch day price :)
Post edited November 20, 2015 by Kardwill
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amok: Why?

edit: Lets take KSP. There is at least 12 people working on that team. it has been in development since 2011, that's 4 years, so you need to pay 12 people 4 year salaries. Lets say they get $10.000 a year? thats under minimum wage, I think.... but any way.... that makes it 12*4*10.000 = $600000. Selling at $30 a pop means they need to sell 20.000 copies just to get the cost of the salaries recuperated. We are now not even talking about other cost such as renting space, getting equipment and software. And it is way bellow minimal wage... not to mention legal costs...
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nightcraw1er.488: But, taking that example, a quick search roughly shows that there are over 1m copies of KSP sold via steam, so at that rate $30 = $30m, ok, there are obviously costs, taxes and what not to take out of it, but a nice little earner really.

If your happy to pay the increasing prices then fine. Me I am not that rich.
Questions that go through my mind...

So what is minimal wage exactly? remember "No, indeed they should make money"...

And what increasing price, exactly?

How much do you pay for a cinema ticket, and how long does that last...
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tinyE: I for one despise labels and the only reason we have them is because of the fucking SJWs, Hipsters, and Slackers that control this place!
Heh, clever irony, this! +1
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nightcraw1er.488: **Note, have just checked and neither of these games are tagged indie - oops :o) However, Kerbal Space Program £30. broken age £19, Dreamfall Chapters £27 as some examples, are far overpriced.
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amok: Why?

edit: Lets take KSP. There is at least 12 people working on that team. it has been in development since 2011, that's 4 years, so you need to pay 12 people 4 year salaries. Lets say they get $10.000 a year? thats under minimum wage, I think.... but any way.... that makes it 12*4*10.000 = $600000. Selling at $30 a pop means they need to sell 20.000 copies just to get the cost of the salaries recuperated. We are now not even talking about other cost such as renting space, getting equipment and software. And it is way bellow minimal wage... not to mention legal costs...
While that's a very nice calculation and everything, it fails to acknowledge a few simple realities. The price of a game does not magically become "fair" simply because the people behind it need to cover their costs. What if those same 12 people had spent 8 years on the game, rather than 4, and produced the exact same game in the end? Would it then make sense for them to charge €80 for it rather than the €40 they charge (me) now? What if there'd been 24 of them rather than 12? Should it cost €160?

I paid €35 for GTA5. Compared to the production value of that, charging €40 for KSP is... unrealistic.
I disagree. The "Indie" genre should definitely stay since it's a unique category. Some people like to search out certain Indie games like and [url=https://www.gog.com/game/ziggurat]Ziggurat.

Speaking of categories, I wish the tag “Roguelite” could be added to GOG. :P
Post edited November 20, 2015 by IronArcturus
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amok: Why?

edit: Lets take KSP. There is at least 12 people working on that team. it has been in development since 2011, that's 4 years, so you need to pay 12 people 4 year salaries. Lets say they get $10.000 a year? thats under minimum wage, I think.... but any way.... that makes it 12*4*10.000 = $600000. Selling at $30 a pop means they need to sell 20.000 copies just to get the cost of the salaries recuperated. We are now not even talking about other cost such as renting space, getting equipment and software. And it is way bellow minimal wage... not to mention legal costs...
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Wishbone: While that's a very nice calculation and everything, it fails to acknowledge a few simple realities. The price of a game does not magically become "fair" simply because the people behind it need to cover their costs. What if those same 12 people had spent 8 years on the game, rather than 4, and produced the exact same game in the end? Would it then make sense for them to charge €80 for it rather than the €40 they charge (me) now? What if there'd been 24 of them rather than 12? Should it cost €160?

I paid €35 for GTA5. Compared to the production value of that, charging €40 for KSP is... unrealistic.
To be honest, leaving all calculations aside, I personally feel that the value of a "thing" is the price a majority is willing to pay for it. In the case if KSP, it seems that most people are willing to pay $30 for it, and therefore becomes the facto value for that game. The is neither an increase or decrease in any value, it is valued at $30. If someone price themselves out of the bracket when they can earn enough monies recoup all costs they are either a) pricing the game wrongly or b) mismanaging the project.

In case of KSP, it seems the at neither of the above happened, and they seems to have hit the golden middle way. So the value of KSP is $30. And it is not an increas in any way.
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Wishbone: While that's a very nice calculation and everything, it fails to acknowledge a few simple realities. The price of a game does not magically become "fair" simply because the people behind it need to cover their costs. What if those same 12 people had spent 8 years on the game, rather than 4, and produced the exact same game in the end? Would it then make sense for them to charge €80 for it rather than the €40 they charge (me) now? What if there'd been 24 of them rather than 12? Should it cost €160?

I paid €35 for GTA5. Compared to the production value of that, charging €40 for KSP is... unrealistic.
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amok: To be honest, leaving all calculations aside, I personally feel that the value of a "thing" is the price a majority is willing to pay for it. In the case if KSP, it seems that most people are willing to pay $30 for it, and therefore becomes the facto value for that game. The is neither an increase or decrease in any value, it is valued at $30. If someone price themselves out of the bracket when they can earn enough monies recoup all costs they are either a) pricing the game wrongly or b) mismanaging the project.

In case of KSP, it seems the at neither of the above happened, and they seems to have hit the golden middle way. So the value of KSP is $30. And it is not an increas in any way.
Thank you. That's the important bit you left out of your calculation post ;-)

And it might still be a) or b). Clearly there are a lot of people unwilling to pay the price they ask for the game. The big question is, if they had priced it at, say, €20 instead, might they actually have made more money? If more than twice the number of people would be willing to pay that price, they would. But who is to say? The only way to test it would be to rewind time and run it again with a different price point, so we'll never know.