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Spy_Gentleman: What about the AMD GPU and drivers? I've heard that their drivers are open source, which means AMD is the best choice for Linux gaming, right?
Currently AMD GPU drivers are a bit inferior to Nvidia in terms of performance. For the best gaming performance on Linux, Nvidia is the way to go. It's a shame AMD's Linux drivers lack performance, as a company they're more open source friendly than Nvidia.
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Spy_Gentleman: What about the AMD GPU and drivers? I've heard that their drivers are open source, which means AMD is the best choice for Linux gaming, right?
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Ganni1987: Currently AMD GPU drivers are a bit inferior to Nvidia in terms of performance. For the best gaming performance on Linux, Nvidia is the way to go. It's a shame AMD's Linux drivers lack performance, as a company they're more open source friendly than Nvidia.
Things should improve in the future, especially with Vulkan.
Just a little tip about some of the "stricter" (i.e no non-free by default) Linuxes -- make sure you've got the various bits of firmware/microcode for your hardware installed.

I had a machine running Debian, and the graphics card performance wasn't so great until I installed the Radeon microcode package as well -- the open source driver was already installed.

Generally, most of this sort of stuff is usually bundled together, and labelled as a non-free firmware package.
Post edited April 04, 2016 by blakstar
Right. New GPUs and CPUs require binary firmware.
Post edited April 04, 2016 by shmerl
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shmerl: Right. New GPUs and CPUs require and binary firmware.
Not only the new ones -- this sort of stuff stretches back even as far as the Radeon 9500 cards!
I just tried running Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition.

start.sh produces this nonsense:

Running Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition
INFO: status: 1
INFO: error: cannot open /home/<user>/.local/share/Baldur's Gate - Enhanced Edition/Baldur.lua: No such file or directory
INFO: Creating DPWrapper
INFO: Steam not found
INFO: can't open chitin.key!!
support/gog_com.shlib: line 94: 21410 Segmentation fault ./"${bin_64}"

Grrr.... Sounds like another XFS issue to me. I'll test in the small loop partition and add the game to the infamous list of ones suffering from this bug if it is so.

UPDATE:

OK, bug confirmed. It's annoying this still happens. Adding the game to the list:
https://www.gog.com/mix/linux_games_with_large_xfs_partition_bug

UPDATE2:

I'll try reporting this bug to Beamdog (a bit later). But the fact that they still use 32-bit build isn't very encouraging. I hope they at least pay attention to bug reports.
Post edited April 04, 2016 by shmerl
Every time I try to open the game I get this error message. Haven't even seen the main screen yet... please help!


Ugh. I keep getting this error (which is not at all helpful in telling me what is actually messing up or where).

Could someone please advise???
Attachments:
Post edited April 12, 2016 by SeanJMcCoy
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SeanJMcCoy: Every time I try to open the game I get this error message. Haven't even seen the main screen yet... please help!

Ugh. I keep getting this error (which is not at all helpful in telling me what is actually messing up or where).

Could someone please advise???
This is the "General Linux FAQ and Troubleshooting" thread and that's a Windows dialog.

Also, in typical Windows fashion, that dialog doesn't actually say anything useful (ie. google-able) because "useful" is apparently slang for "confusing/scary" according to Microsoft policy... just "[Message about something going wrong] Call in an expert." (In this case, "The program crashed")

Contact GOG technical support. This is specifically what they're there for. (And, if you bought it less than 30 days ago and they can't solve it for you, you'll be eligible for a refund.)
Post edited April 12, 2016 by ssokolow
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shmerl: I just tried running Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition.

start.sh produces this nonsense:

Running Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition
INFO: status: 1
INFO: error: cannot open /home/<user>/.local/share/Baldur's Gate - Enhanced Edition/Baldur.lua: No such file or directory
INFO: Creating DPWrapper
INFO: Steam not found
INFO: can't open chitin.key!!
support/gog_com.shlib: line 94: 21410 Segmentation fault ./"${bin_64}"

Grrr.... Sounds like another XFS issue to me. I'll test in the small loop partition and add the game to the infamous list of ones suffering from this bug if it is so.

UPDATE:

OK, bug confirmed. It's annoying this still happens. Adding the game to the list:
https://www.gog.com/mix/linux_games_with_large_xfs_partition_bug

UPDATE2:

I'll try reporting this bug to Beamdog (a bit later). But the fact that they still use 32-bit build isn't very encouraging. I hope they at least pay attention to bug reports.
I have gotten this path type error with the ext3 filesystem. No lvm/lvm2, dmraid, but am using AHCI. 750Gg SATA II drive. ( can't remember the GOG Linux Install game ).

Suspect it may have something to do with "supported file systems" , "shared libs", and/or AHCI on the developers machine.

You might want to ask about Kernel Version and AHCI usage in error reports as well.
When will you start support DOSbox games on Linux?
It's as easy as using DOSbox on Windows.

I mean, right now, Windows versions of DOSbox games can have their installer unpacked, manually put in a folder, and then have someone run that game's version of 'dosbox dosbox.conf' in terminal or by making a link to it in their distro of choice.

Really, just add the Linux option to these games already. It's 5 minutes to unpack, set up, and repack with a bash script.
(I can do it for you if you hire me to? *hint, hint*)
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Maki: When will you start support DOSbox games on Linux?
It's as easy as using DOSbox on Windows.

I mean, right now, Windows versions of DOSbox games can have their installer unpacked, manually put in a folder, and then have someone run that game's version of 'dosbox dosbox.conf' in terminal or by making a link to it in their distro of choice.

Really, just add the Linux option to these games already. It's 5 minutes to unpack, set up, and repack with a bash script.
(I can do it for you if you hire me to? *hint, hint*)
It's a licensing issue. Standard contracts are for "platforms X, Y, and no others" so the rightsholder gets the least unpleasant side of "unforeseen consequences" and GOG has to renegotiate to add Linux to that list.
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Maki: When will you start support DOSbox games on Linux?
It's as easy as using DOSbox on Windows.

I mean, right now, Windows versions of DOSbox games can have their installer unpacked, manually put in a folder, and then have someone run that game's version of 'dosbox dosbox.conf' in terminal or by making a link to it in their distro of choice.

Really, just add the Linux option to these games already. It's 5 minutes to unpack, set up, and repack with a bash script.
(I can do it for you if you hire me to? *hint, hint*)
this is the answer I got a month or two ago when I asked support:
Hello, unfortunately I can't give you any information on whether we will be adding Linux installers to our DosBox games in the near future; while we of course try our best to offer our games for as many modern operating systems as we can, there are a lot of things involved in this process.
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Maki: I mean, right now, Windows versions of DOSbox games can have their installer unpacked, manually put in a folder, and then have someone run that game's version of 'dosbox dosbox.conf' in terminal or by making a link to it in their distro of choice.
Except for some tweaks in those conf files. They can't be used on Linux as is most of the time (things like paths syntax and various MIDI and graphics settings can differ).
Post edited April 18, 2016 by shmerl
Something odd with my installation of Mint 17.3 and it started recently:

System bootup is really fast :-)

I am not really complaining but amazed at how the time has halved this year.
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Themken: Something odd with my installation of Mint 17.3 and it started recently:

System bootup is really fast :-)

I am not really complaining but amazed at how the time has halved this year.
May be you switched to SSD?-) It makes a huge difference.