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We're finally able to show our Linux community some love.
That sounds great, and we're super excited, but what does it all mean exactly?

Here are some of the questions you may have before getting started:

Which Linux distributions do you support?
We test and support our games on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Mint 17 LTS.

Are you planning to add official support for more Linux distributions?
We promise to always offer support for the most recent LTS release of Ubuntu and Mint.
There are no plans to officially support other Linux distributions at this time, sorry.

Will GOG games work on other distributions anyway?
You're more than welcome to give it a try, but we cannot guarantee that everything will work without a hitch.
That means we won't be able to offer refunds, or support, for technical issues on a Linux distribution other than Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Mint 17 LTS.

What is Wine? Why do you label games that use it?
Wine is a compatibility layer that implements a Windows environment on Linux machines.

Wine carries some inherent performance and stability disadvantages. We place great importance on testing and building Wine games to make sure they are up to our standards of quality and performance, and we will support and stand by these releases. At the same time we recognise that this may not be an ideal solution for everyone, and that some of our users approach Wine with a healthy bit of scepticism.

We feel that it's your right, as our customer, to be informed about any traces of the Wine wrapper on Linux.

That's the gist of it, but there are still questions left unanswered.
You can find more answers and technical help in our General Linux Troubleshooting FAQ!
Post edited July 24, 2014 by SStefania
high rated
I don't know what you are talking about.
Here, have a look at this attached cute Red Panda instead :)
Attachments:
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heliar: Thank you GOG team for implementing Linux support.

Do you plan to add Linux versions for another games that are already purchasable on GOG for Windows (e.g. Brutal Legend or Broken Sword 5)?
If we get permission to do so, sure :)
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Rabcor: That is bullshit, that is so much bullshit that I will not touch GoG until this policy changes, no refunds for people who aren't using your chosen distributions? Give me a fucking break! [...]
I am sorry you feel this way :( Let me tell you that the decision to support only two chosen distributions (the two most popular ones, currently) doesn't come from spite or our bad will towards the community.

It comes from the fact that we have to make sacrifices in order to retain as much "GOG-way" as possible - i.e. user friendliness and a guarantee that a game you paid money for actually works. In order to do that we had to select an environment that is not only friendly for the users, but also friendly to us. Right now, supporting games on Arch Linux would mean that we would not only have to support the game itself, but also every instance of an individual system installed and configured by the user.

I understand where you are coming from and I am a big fan of the open source community. However, once you start taking customers' money, you take responsibility for the product you ship. I am a big fan of Arch Linux (because one successful installation of it teaches you a ton about both the hardware and the Linux systems themselves), but right now I can't see how we could guarantee that the games we ship on a system that each users builds for himself work correctly each and every time. And selling people games that we have to refund immediately (because they don't work) is just a good way to aggravate our customers.

The bottom line is this: our "ideal" is that a game we ship works "out-of-the-box" on a supported system. You download our installer, take your computer to the middle of nowhere with no internet connection, you install with a double click and play. We already had to sacrifice a bit of that - some games require i386 libraries on 64-bit systems.
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Gydion: Are you running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Mint 17 LTS? Then it's the correct thread. If you're not, then I don't know. The gamecard has a list of the required Ubuntu packages:

Requires the following packages to be installed: libc6:i386, libasound2:i386, libasound2-data:i386, libasound2-plugins:i386 and dependencies, Notice: game comes with a 32-bit binary only, this is a Wine game
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vicklemos: Yup, I'm running Ubuntu 14.04 (64-bit, requirements are ok) and I have absolutely no clues on how to install those 32-bit dependencies. I've been using linux on a daily basis for the past year for entertainment purposes only, so I didn't have the proper time to learn this kinda stuff :P
Thanks!
Please send us a Support ticket about FlatOut 2, if you don't mind :)
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gildur: Why there is no deb for Flatout 2?
Because it's made Linux compatible via Wine :)
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JudasIscariot: Because it's made Linux compatible via Wine :)
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gildur: Ok, but why this is a problem for creating a deb installer?
I don't know as I don't make the Linux builds, perhaps because it's a Wine-wrapped build and maybe installing the game game from a .deb would interfere with Wine on the system. Again, I really don't know all the details :)
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Rabcor: The troubleshooting page linked to in the OP calls wine an emulator. Once again, Wine is not an emulator.
Of course it's not, we forgot to change this one line before publishing the article. But it should be corrected now :)
If you see similar mistakes, please let us know!
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Tolya: I am sorry you feel this way :( Let me tell you that the decision to support only two chosen distributions (the two most popular ones, currently) doesn't come from spite or our bad will towards the community.

It comes from the fact that we have to make sacrifices in order to retain as much "GOG-way" as possible - i.e. user friendliness and a guarantee that a game you paid money for actually works. In order to do that we had to select an environment that is not only friendly for the users, but also friendly to us. Right now, supporting games on Arch Linux would mean that we would not only have to support the game itself, but also every instance of an individual system installed and configured by the user.

I understand where you are coming from and I am a big fan of the open source community. However, once you start taking customers' money, you take responsibility for the product you ship. I am a big fan of Arch Linux (because one successful installation of it teaches you a ton about both the hardware and the Linux systems themselves), but right now I can't see how we could guarantee that the games we ship on a system that each users builds for himself work correctly each and every time. And selling people games that we have to refund immediately (because they don't work) is just a good way to aggravate our customers.

The bottom line is this: our "ideal" is that a game we ship works "out-of-the-box" on a supported system. You download our installer, take your computer to the middle of nowhere with no internet connection, you install with a double click and play. We already had to sacrifice a bit of that - some games require i386 libraries on 64-bit systems.
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lcatlnx: Hello,

people who use stuff like arch, know why they do it and what they do. Please rethink your position regarding those people. We are the linux community. Not only arch, there are many others and it is not needed to provide us with the kind of support you describe here, we want other things from you. :)

It is in my opinion completely okay to go the ubuntu/mint/deb only way. Steam does that too.

But! You are gog and from what i learned from the current discussion, you could gain a severe coolness factor in the linux area and community. Please ask yourself why that did not happen so far!

What do you need to change this?

Here is my humble proposal:

1. Do not support more distributions than you currently do. Again, thats fine.
2. Open your build scripts for ubuntu/mint/debian packages, upload them to a local git on your servers and link them to the games.
3. Document the way you implemented a games package to make it run on your supported distros.
4. Provide that documentation too linked to the supported games.
5. Continue to deliver the currently delivered tar.gz files.

We do not need more than that.

Why should you do it that way?

See -> https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/steam and think about what happend there.

Please also take a look at this link and again think about it. -> https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Arch_User_Repository

Best Regards,

A arch linux steam user and gog customer.
Correct me if I am wrong but don't our tar.gz archives contain everything you need in order to try and get a given game running on an unsupported distro?

I ask because I am not on the Linux team at GOG, just an average GNU/Linux novice (Mint 17 is my distro at the moment :) )
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llirium: The official Linux press release mentioned that tarballs would be available, yet only Ubuntu and Mint are mentioned in the main games search. Why not a third option for sorting by tarballs too?
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Gydion: Which games don't have tarballs? Regardless, the tarballs are only supported on Ubuntu and Mint.
All Linux games have tarballs.
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JudasIscariot: Correct me if I am wrong but don't our tar.gz archives contain everything you need in order to try and get a given game running on an unsupported distro?

I ask because I am not on the Linux team at GOG, just an average GNU/Linux novice (Mint 17 is my distro at the moment :) )
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MrPointless: Not quite, I suspect. In my case (Antergos here, which is based on Arch), I still needed to install libpng12 to run DOSBox games and lib32-alsa-lib to get audio in FlatOut. Those weren't hard to figure out and obtain through pacman, though. They were practically screaming those names in the terminal.

Not that I'm complaining. I knew I was in for a little manual work when I ditched Ubuntu. Probably because I still had to do some manual work in that distro anyway.
There is a dependency list in the requirements. ALSA comes with Ubuntu/Mint, so it isn't listed.
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Tolya: All Linux games have tarballs.
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sbolokanov: There is a error for Flatout.

Flatout - Linux installer, English

It is a tarball in reality, although it states the opposite xD
Fixed :) Thanks!
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MrBoat: I have a lil problem with Mark of the Ninja: Special Edition.

I've no problem running the base game, but when I extract and copy the tarball of the Special Edition the start.sh won't work. I changes the original start.sh for the Special Edition one in orden to play, but I do not get any Special Edition subtitle on the menus, so I don't know if I'm playing to it or not.

The base game is at 1.3v while the SE is at 1.2v, maybe that's the problem?
If you see a level called "Dosan's Story" in the level selection menu after hitting start, you have the Special Edition version installed :)
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king_mosiah: I have noticed Pier Solar does not show up when typing 'linux' into the search above my library.
Should be fixed now :)
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SStefania: That's the gist of it, but there are still questions left unanswered.
You can find more answers and technical help in our General Linux Troubleshooting FAQ!
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shmerl:
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JudasIscariot: Please send us a Support ticket
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shmerl: Folks, can you please comment on the issue of some installers using RAR and having password in them? It makes unpacking them with innoextract impossible (or with unrar for that matter). Is there any reason to use those passwords? Is it a new behavior of innosetup, and can you switch it off somehow if it's so?
Write to Support about it as that's something beyond me :)
Post edited December 21, 2014 by JudasIscariot