It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer or Opera

×
avatar
Dryspace: ...
avatar
ciemnogrodzianin: Nice list! With such interests you should definitely try the game. Believe me, you will not regret :)
... and follow with Queen... and Memnoch. It's downhill from there (and in Tale... too), though there is something to be said about Blood and Gold too. And actually even the newer Prince Lestat, if you take it as sort of Queen... 2 and know what to expect, a lot of atmosphere and being taken back there. May actually help if read years after the others though, so...
avatar
Dryspace: ...
avatar
ciemnogrodzianin: Nice list! With such interests you should definitely try the game. Believe me, you will not regret :)
avatar
Cavalary: ... and follow with Queen... and Memnoch. It's downhill from there (and in Tale... too), though there is something to be said about Blood and Gold too. And actually even the newer Prince Lestat, if you take it as sort of Queen... 2 and know what to expect, a lot of atmosphere and being taken back there. May actually help if read years after the others though, so..
LOL. I finally purchased it last week, and in fact it is preparation for my first playthrough of the game that is the reason I am reading these stories. :)

EDIT: I included The Vampire Lestat in my list, as I am almost finished with it. I will read The Queen of the Damned again, or at least parts of it, but I will skip The Tale of the Body Thief. The only other in the series I possess is The Vampire Armand, which I will attempt. I also have The Mummy and Vittorio the Vampire, neither of which I have read.

@Cavalary I will check out Prince Lestat, but I didn't find The Queen of the Damned to be as engaging as The Vampire Lestat. I really enjoyed certain parts, but I didn't find it to be anything near as cohesive as The Vampire Lestat, to say nothing of Interview with the Vampire.
Post edited December 18, 2018 by Dryspace
avatar
Dryspace: @Cavalary I will check out Prince Lestat, but I didn't find The Queen of the Damned to be as engaging as The Vampire Lestat. I really enjoyed certain parts, but I didn't find it to be anything near as cohesive as The Vampire Lestat, to say nothing of Interview with the Vampire.
They do rather need to be read in order. Armand will likely make little sense without Memnoch, but then again it's not exactly a good one either way. Body Thief can largely be skipped, yes. It will be referred to in later ones, but you can get the gist of it. Rice herself utterly ignores the events in Merrick, Blackwood Farm and Blood Canticle, and also Vittorio, in Prince Lestat (heh, ended up writing a heck of a long review of that); those are largely to be discarded.

And enjoy the game. And the preparations for it :)
Aviatoarea (The Aviator)

Got this from a book exchange, so didn’t actually pay for it at least. Wouldn’t have given much even because of the size alone anyway, a more serious magazine likely being longer. Admittedly, that at least meant I could go through it quickly, but some problems could have been fixed by writing more, a lot more, if that’d have meant adding explanations, worldbuilding, making things make sense and have some depth. As it is, I wonder why it’s considered science fiction, since there’s no science in it, and I’d say it can’t be called fantasy either, since that should also make sense, be internally consistent, even if in a place where the laws of nature differ, and there’s nothing of the sort here. I guess it could be seen as some sort of fairy tale, but that’s about it.
For example, how come there are so many messenger pilots and planes and apparently even common, everyday messages are delivered in person by plane? How come this happens in a village, and how come it has an academy to train the pilots for that matter? Then, how were the children just forgotten in said village right away, and how come nobody cared when they were noticed again? Even if you allow for some interventions according to what’s explained at the end, none of that makes any sense. Interestingly, the stranger things that happen later could make some sense, assuming fantasy “rules”, and the last 30 pages are actually much better in every way, but there are few attempts to explain and everything, whether we’re talking of events, character development or feelings, is rushed through and… At times sort of in a fog, if I may say so.
And then there’s the matter of the dialogues, which are completely forced, not natural or believable in any way. The writing style itself can be passable otherwise, but definitely not when it comes to anything spoken, that being so bad that it actually made me check whether it wasn’t somehow written in a different language at first and then translated, badly.

Rating: 2/5
A man of quality - Georges Simenon

Third installment in the Maigret series. Still a slow pace and a wonderful social study, this time on hidden secrets and double lives. Middle-class people are really "middle", but rich or noble people are not much better, either. In addition, written in the 1930s, it's an interesting mirror of past french society.

Un travelo nommé désir Noël Simsolo

Another installment in the "Le Poulpe" series. A political/crimeworld story, with a background in the red light districts and the prostitution industry. Each story of Le Poulpe is written by a different author, following the same guidelines, but that one really felt... bland. The author followed the guidelines, but with no "genuis". You felt he understood the concept of Le Poulpe, but not really the character itself.

So far in 2018: https://www.gog.com/forum/general/books_finished_in_2018/post9
Dark Tower Series: Song of Susanna
Slugfest, by Reed Tucker. (Every time I see that name I have to remind myself that the World's Toughest Milkman was Reid Fleming.) About the Marvel vs. DC Comics rivalry. This book reminded me a bit of Console Wars, another popular history about a corporate rivalry in a nerd industry, in both positive and negative ways.

Tucker admits right off that he's a Marvel guy. He hits most of the traditional main points when people talk about the two companies - DC created the superhero genre but is stiff and conservative, Marvel is freewheeling and does soap opera really well. It pretty much starts in the early 60s with Marvel creating Fantastic Four as an industry underdog, and eventually ends up talking about the competing movie universes, finishing with a depressing final chapter on how both companies have been completely subsumed by their corporate masters, the comics haven't made any actual money in decades, and they each really only are kept around as little IP farms for Hollywood and merchandising.

There are some cool anecdotes included about things that happened in the Marvel or DC offices over the years, but Tucker tends to jump back and forth in history within the chapters and he gets sloppy at times. For instance, in the lengthy chapter on the 90s boom and bust, he talks about how the two companies were so hard hit by the bust that they agreed to do a new wave of crossovers together to generate reader excitement. The problem is that the first of these crossovers, the Batman and Punisher stories, came out in 94, when the Knightfall stories were happily chugging along and generating tons of sales. The crash didn't occur until around 1996. Oops.

There are also some odd things he says - when he talks about DC's creation of the Vertigo imprint, the very first title he mentions is Transmetropolitan, a latter day series that was created for DC's sci-fi Helix imprint and then shifted to Vertigo after Helix bombed (my favorite Helix book was Tim Truman's Black Lamb, but no one else bought that one). Sandman, the actual Vertigo flagship title gets a brief mention a paragraph later, and Hellblazer, probably the other major mainstay along with Swamp Thing, gets no mention ever. I have a bit of the same problem I had with Console Wars in that the author is keeping such a broad view of the corporate rivalry that he often overlooks what was actually happening in terms of the companies' particular styles and the comics being offered, unless discussion is unavoidable. Alan Moore, probably the most important post-Silver Age DC writer, is barely discussed as Tucker doesn't bother to go into stuff like DC's recruitment of British writers in the 80s or Marvel bringing in foreign artists in the 70s and how that affected their outputs. You get a good idea of why the companies had this traditional rivalry with each other, but only a hazy view of what they were actually creating.
★★★ The Freeze-Frame Revolution / Peter Watts
★★☆ Suvorov's Alphabet / Viktor Suvorov
★★★ Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship / Robert C. Martin
★★☆ Grokking Algorithms An Illustrated Guide For Programmers and Other Curious People / Aditya Y. Bhargava
★★★ Stałe Warianty Gry / Grzegorz Braun
★☆☆ Na marginesie życia / Stanisław Grzesiuk

List of all books finished in 2018.
I did not finish many books this year. One reason being that bad luck destroyed my pile of ongoing books. I had to throw them away :-( Which reminds me I have to replace the one borrowed book in that pile.

But, I did read; mostly cartoons though and mostly such that were written for a bit older readers. No Mickey Mouse for me. Still somehow mentioning those here a lot feels embarressing as it is still considered lower level reading by many.
avatar
Themken: ...
Yes, many people still consider them not different art-style, but something worse, indeed.

But it's exactly the same with science-fiction, which is considered as some pew-pew-in-space literature and most people don't realize that there is a serious reflection on the world's problems and future in the genre (at least much more serious than in mainstream fiction).

The only comic books I read are those purchased from Humble Bundle from time to time. Just to keep some contact with this interesting art form. However usually I'm disappointed with them. The last great comic book reading I remenber was something about 150 books of "Walking Dead" a year or two ago. I watched only part of 1st season of TV series and was bored with it, but later found out that the story in comic books is just awesome and I've read all of them.
Dear all - I'd like to invite you to the new thread for 2019! :) Feel free, of course, to update also this one, if there are still any readings to be reported for 2018.

Have a great year with a lot of time and full of fantastic readings!
Neil Gaiman's:
Neverwhere
Smoke & Mirrors
The Graveyard Book
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Stephen King's:
Joyland
Sleeping Beauties (with Owen King)

Murakami's:
The Secret Library
The Elephant Vanishes

Kafka's:
The Metamorphosis

Aldous Huxley's:
Brave New World (re-read actually)
Post edited January 01, 2019 by jonridan