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Ok so firstly and on a side note - does the resolution of the game seem a bit low? I'm playing the game at 3440x1440 which I was able to select from the options menu but even the text on screen doesn't seem sharp at all - is this just the style of the game?

On my first mission - The Exchange, I first refused to give him the money and then opted to try to kill him when he offered the whiskey for free. Now all I have it the yellow mission marker and no ship and no exchange was made - the mission is still showing as incomplete yet I can't do anything else?

I can't get me head around the combat either - particularly the broadside cannons. When I right click it shows the purple and then yellow path which the shot is fully charged but it doesn't seem to aiming very well - it felt more like pure luck when I hit some ships. Any tips on this?

It looks like a really cool game and I really want to play it but I hate games that are overly complicated - can't do stratedgy games at all for example - if the a game feels like it's more like work than fun then I give up and don't want that to happen in this game...
It's quite simple when you've got your head around it. Firstly I would recommend using a Xbox/PlayStation controller if you have one as I've heard that it is much harder with mouse+keyboard. With the mission, either pay him the money (easiest), or attack him (harder, potentially more expensive). If the ship has disappeared then reload the game - this shouldn't happen. Once you've got the whiskey, fly back to Rust City (It should be marked on the map) to complete the mission.
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T.Hodd: It's quite simple when you've got your head around it. Firstly I would recommend using a Xbox/PlayStation controller if you have one as I've heard that it is much harder with mouse+keyboard. With the mission, either pay him the money (easiest), or attack him (harder, potentially more expensive). If the ship has disappeared then reload the game - this shouldn't happen. Once you've got the whiskey, fly back to Rust City (It should be marked on the map) to complete the mission.
Ok I'll plug in my controller and restart then - thanks for the advice.

Edit: Ok getting the feel for this now ok. The resolution issues has also been resolved - whilst I had selected 3440x1440 it had defaulted back to 1440x900 and stretched it across the screen - after reloading it's fine now and looks great.

One slight annoyance is that if you get killed in between missions it isn't saving any progress you made such is blowing up hostiles and any cargo you collected. Is there a way of saving the game or is this the way it is?
Post edited July 22, 2017 by heartburnron
Me also finding this game confusing with its 3D graphics but 2D play. Very soon going back to the X3 games and Independence Wars games where you can fly in any direction.
The game is saved every time you dock or undock. It is important to remember this in order to get into the flow of the game. I was confused at first but soon enough I realised it is actually a true restore point, not a checkpoint or some other in-between.

I disagree about the controller vs mouse argument. I've played both and I don't think there is any advantage to either.

As for the broadsides and any other questions you may have... it sounds like you're right there in the very beginning of the game in a garbage ship with ancient weapons and equipment. The main drive of this game is the need and want for bigger and better ships. Having a starter ship that feels outdated is supposed to motivate you to get the next one quickly.

Curious thing about progression: Ships and ship equipment/weapons/etc have the same buy and sell prices, so in theory you can never lose money buying ships and equipment. You don't need to save money and skip things because you can always get your money back. Buy a new ship, kit it out as you make more money, and later you sell it all for the exact same amount of money when you have enough to buy a bigger ship. You never lose money. The only way to lose money is on repairs, missiles and selling commodities cheaper than you bought them.

Another thing about broadsides: Early in the game you will not be fighting ships large enough to target reliably with broadsides. They are slightly aim-assisted, but they are terrible at tracking small ships and fighters before your player skill improves. The game is TERRIBLE at explaining how you should actually be fighting early in the game and it certainly does not properly explain how all the weapon systems actually work and what you're supposed to do with them.

After a couple of hours things should start making sense and you get into the flow of the game. The game has an INCREDIBLE flow, it is one of the fastest playing space games I've ever played. There aren't all that many game mechanics and game play loops, so once you figure them out you can string it all together and just keep the momentum up just tearing through from fight to fight and the next great cash cow. It picks up slowly but gets ever faster as you progress.
Thanks for the replies guys. Going to fire this up and have a another go now...
Thank you Sufyan for the helpful advice!
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Sufyan: The game is saved every time you dock or undock. It is important to remember this in order to get into the flow of the game. I was confused at first but soon enough I realised it is actually a true restore point, not a checkpoint or some other in-between.

I disagree about the controller vs mouse argument. I've played both and I don't think there is any advantage to either.

As for the broadsides and any other questions you may have... it sounds like you're right there in the very beginning of the game in a garbage ship with ancient weapons and equipment. The main drive of this game is the need and want for bigger and better ships. Having a starter ship that feels outdated is supposed to motivate you to get the next one quickly.

Curious thing about progression: Ships and ship equipment/weapons/etc have the same buy and sell prices, so in theory you can never lose money buying ships and equipment. You don't need to save money and skip things because you can always get your money back. Buy a new ship, kit it out as you make more money, and later you sell it all for the exact same amount of money when you have enough to buy a bigger ship. You never lose money. The only way to lose money is on repairs, missiles and selling commodities cheaper than you bought them.

Another thing about broadsides: Early in the game you will not be fighting ships large enough to target reliably with broadsides. They are slightly aim-assisted, but they are terrible at tracking small ships and fighters before your player skill improves. The game is TERRIBLE at explaining how you should actually be fighting early in the game and it certainly does not properly explain how all the weapon systems actually work and what you're supposed to do with them.

After a couple of hours things should start making sense and you get into the flow of the game. The game has an INCREDIBLE flow, it is one of the fastest playing space games I've ever played. There aren't all that many game mechanics and game play loops, so once you figure them out you can string it all together and just keep the momentum up just tearing through from fight to fight and the next great cash cow. It picks up slowly but gets ever faster as you progress.
I have another couple of questions please Sufyan if you don't mind...

- what do I do with any Contraband I find - I keep getting pulled up by the Militia - do I need to take it somewhere?

- how do I mine rocks for resources? I can detect them but when I approch them, there doesn't seem to be any options to do anything?

Thanks
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Sufyan: The game is saved every time you dock or undock. It is important to remember this in order to get into the flow of the game. I was confused at first but soon enough I realised it is actually a true restore point, not a checkpoint or some other in-between.

I disagree about the controller vs mouse argument. I've played both and I don't think there is any advantage to either.

As for the broadsides and any other questions you may have... it sounds like you're right there in the very beginning of the game in a garbage ship with ancient weapons and equipment. The main drive of this game is the need and want for bigger and better ships. Having a starter ship that feels outdated is supposed to motivate you to get the next one quickly.

Curious thing about progression: Ships and ship equipment/weapons/etc have the same buy and sell prices, so in theory you can never lose money buying ships and equipment. You don't need to save money and skip things because you can always get your money back. Buy a new ship, kit it out as you make more money, and later you sell it all for the exact same amount of money when you have enough to buy a bigger ship. You never lose money. The only way to lose money is on repairs, missiles and selling commodities cheaper than you bought them.

Another thing about broadsides: Early in the game you will not be fighting ships large enough to target reliably with broadsides. They are slightly aim-assisted, but they are terrible at tracking small ships and fighters before your player skill improves. The game is TERRIBLE at explaining how you should actually be fighting early in the game and it certainly does not properly explain how all the weapon systems actually work and what you're supposed to do with them.

After a couple of hours things should start making sense and you get into the flow of the game. The game has an INCREDIBLE flow, it is one of the fastest playing space games I've ever played. There aren't all that many game mechanics and game play loops, so once you figure them out you can string it all together and just keep the momentum up just tearing through from fight to fight and the next great cash cow. It picks up slowly but gets ever faster as you progress.
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heartburnron: I have another couple of questions please Sufyan if you don't mind...

- what do I do with any Contraband I find - I keep getting pulled up by the Militia - do I need to take it somewhere?

- how do I mine rocks for resources? I can detect them but when I approch them, there doesn't seem to be any options to do anything?

Thanks
Contraband is just like any other commodity except you get randomly halted by Militia ships if you're carrying it. Either just ignore it (and drop it if you accidentally pick it up) or fly it to a station that is currently buying this particular contraband for a decent price. Most commodities, including those marked as contraband, are not very lucrative under normal circumstances but every station may randomly be affected by politics, disasters and wars that greatly affects buy and sell prices as well as needs.

As for mining, you just shoot asteroids and they will drop ore as they explode. You can get a mining upgrade that highlights specific points on the asteroids you can shoot to potentially drop more ore than usual.

Mining and trading is a very slow way to make money compared to running missions or even just fighting random encounters as quickly as you can for bounties and sellable loot (commodities and ship equipment).

This isn't a very deep game, but it can get very "zen" and you just tear through it and make enough money to try different ships and different weapons so that you can earn more money even faster. The story is short, the grind is long, love it or hate it.
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heartburnron: I have another couple of questions please Sufyan if you don't mind...

- what do I do with any Contraband I find - I keep getting pulled up by the Militia - do I need to take it somewhere?

- how do I mine rocks for resources? I can detect them but when I approch them, there doesn't seem to be any options to do anything?

Thanks
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Sufyan: Contraband is just like any other commodity except you get randomly halted by Militia ships if you're carrying it. Either just ignore it (and drop it if you accidentally pick it up) or fly it to a station that is currently buying this particular contraband for a decent price. Most commodities, including those marked as contraband, are not very lucrative under normal circumstances but every station may randomly be affected by politics, disasters and wars that greatly affects buy and sell prices as well as needs.

As for mining, you just shoot asteroids and they will drop ore as they explode. You can get a mining upgrade that highlights specific points on the asteroids you can shoot to potentially drop more ore than usual.

Mining and trading is a very slow way to make money compared to running missions or even just fighting random encounters as quickly as you can for bounties and sellable loot (commodities and ship equipment).

This isn't a very deep game, but it can get very "zen" and you just tear through it and make enough money to try different ships and different weapons so that you can earn more money even faster. The story is short, the grind is long, love it or hate it.
Makes sense. Thanks again for the advice. Cheers.
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Sufyan: The game has an INCREDIBLE flow, it is one of the fastest playing space games I've ever played.
Feeling the flow now!
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Sufyan: The game has an INCREDIBLE flow, it is one of the fastest playing space games I've ever played.
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heartburnron: Feeling the flow now!
Take a mission, get into trouble on the way over there, scoop up some extremely rare loot, go somewhere to sell it where a random event is causing the market to go nuts, realize that this station and another that is just one minute away are currently perfectly matched to exploit the market shuttling back and forth, etc etc. I often feel like I'm constantly discovering new lucrative avenues while playing the game. You can be in constant motion making a profit from minute to minute without running into dead ends or spending a lot of time travelling. You run into beacons and traders currently under attack, and these take only a minute to resolve and suddenly you made some money you were not expecting. Five minutes later you get jumped by pirates, who you kill and one of them drops an expensive turret or something. It's like something good is constantly about to happen, all it takes is a little bit of enterprising.

Curiously, the game universe is randomly generated when you start a new game. Only some locations in the first system are the same every time, but once you leave the system everything is randomly set up. You have to discover trade routes on your own as no one can write an FAQ or give you suggestions. Same thing with ships and equipment, you have to figure out on your own which stations sell what stuff in your own playthrough. It isn't deep, but it is engaging.
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heartburnron: Feeling the flow now!
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Sufyan: Take a mission, get into trouble on the way over there, scoop up some extremely rare loot, go somewhere to sell it where a random event is causing the market to go nuts, realize that this station and another that is just one minute away are currently perfectly matched to exploit the market shuttling back and forth, etc etc. I often feel like I'm constantly discovering new lucrative avenues while playing the game. You can be in constant motion making a profit from minute to minute without running into dead ends or spending a lot of time travelling. You run into beacons and traders currently under attack, and these take only a minute to resolve and suddenly you made some money you were not expecting. Five minutes later you get jumped by pirates, who you kill and one of them drops an expensive turret or something. It's like something good is constantly about to happen, all it takes is a little bit of enterprising.

Curiously, the game universe is randomly generated when you start a new game. Only some locations in the first system are the same every time, but once you leave the system everything is randomly set up. You have to discover trade routes on your own as no one can write an FAQ or give you suggestions. Same thing with ships and equipment, you have to figure out on your own which stations sell what stuff in your own playthrough. It isn't deep, but it is engaging.
Agreed and I've found that too - there's barely 2 consecutive uneventful minutes when travelling - it's really well done.

Can you tell me a bit about scanning and the random 'Weapons platforms' that are floating around? I haven't found a use for either of these things as of yet...
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heartburnron: Can you tell me a bit about scanning and the random 'Weapons platforms' that are floating around? I haven't found a use for either of these things as of yet...
They are just there to defend the station if someone chooses to attack it. If you go to a hostile run station (Red Devil ones right at the beginning of the game) you will get shot by them.
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heartburnron: Can you tell me a bit about scanning and the random 'Weapons platforms' that are floating around? I haven't found a use for either of these things as of yet...
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Links: They are just there to defend the station if someone chooses to attack it. If you go to a hostile run station (Red Devil ones right at the beginning of the game) you will get shot by them.
Ah ok. Thanks.