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nightcraw1er.488: Certain drm modules which were used on old cds such as securom, had their drivers blacklisted from win 10
Bu..but, how can this be?? Microsoft assured me that every drm is sacred, every drm is good! In fact, every drm is NEEDED in my neighborhood!! /s

EDIT

Did anyone get my joke? I thought it was good. : (
Post edited September 22, 2020 by BlueMooner
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scientiae:
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nightcraw1er.488: Also, there is geekuninstaller which I have found works wonders at uninstalling software, rooting out tricky to find leftovers, and force removing that which M$ in their wisdom think we shouldn’t uninstall. First and foremost of those being any browser from M$ including edge. Almost any other browser is better. In fact all M$ products have been getting worse each iteration since Gates left, Hotmail is now a mess of advertising color blobbing, multi tab, spam collector. Office has a joke “open” file format, rubbish ribbon, now gone online only, and is incompatible with anything. Windows game offerings have always been an affront to the world (who can forget such wonders a GFWDead). Win vista and 8 were awful, 7 being a suprise. Win 10 is better, but with all the surrounding issues like telemetry, bloatware etc. (And we won’t talk about phones!).
I still use my old Office 2003 suite, since it was before M$ made their file formats incompatible (2007?) with earlier versions of their own products, in order to spite their competition (rather than compete against them on a level playing field).
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nightcraw1er.488: Certain drm modules which were used on old cds such as securom, had their drivers blacklisted from win 10
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BlueMooner: Bu..but, how can this be?? Microsoft assured me that every drm is sacred, every drm is good! In fact, every drm is NEEDED in my neighborhood!! /s
Some DRM are more equal than others.

Just like printers need their own ink, and not that awful imitation stuff that slowly poisons them!
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nightcraw1er.488: Certain drm modules which were used on old cds such as securom, had their drivers blacklisted from win 10
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BlueMooner: Bu..but, how can this be?? Microsoft assured me that every drm is sacred, every drm is good! In fact, every drm is NEEDED in my neighborhood!! /s
Who can you trust if not a giant faceless corporation eh?
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Carradice: Fresh install from a USB
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BlueMooner: Do you know of a value in using an ISO versus an installer? The microsoft page gave me the option of getting a win10 installer for my thumbdrive or an ISO, and I chose the installer.
Well, with a bootable ISO you can run the installer, no matter the state of the operating system in the computer. Consider what might happen if there was a catastrophic failure that that prevents you from booting (imagine: you formatted C: or somehow critical files or folders have been damaged). You might just shrug and boot your serviceable ISO from a USB, and have your PC back working fast, no big drama.

It is old news, but, just in case: you might already have a disk or partition for your operating system (C:) and some other for your data. That way, you can do anything to C: without fearing that you might lose much. That said, maybe you would like to keep some data stored by default in C: (like in the folder Appdata, withing Users\Your_user_name), in case some program kept something there that you wish to keep.

It is also generally better to start fresh, since that way you avoid carrying out problems from the older system. Additionally, you start with a clean slate where you can install the programs that you are really going to use. That way you avoid bloat. The trouble of installing the things that you are going to need, as you start needing them, generally pays off, instead of keeping all kinds of things that you forgot what they were for, or that are residues that you no longer need.
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BlueMooner: Do you know of a value in using an ISO versus an installer? The microsoft page gave me the option of getting a win10 installer for my thumbdrive or an ISO, and I chose the installer.
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Carradice: Well, with a bootable ISO you can run the installer, no matter the state of the operating system in the computer. Consider what might happen if there was a catastrophic failure that that prevents you from booting (imagine: you formatted C: or somehow critical files or folders have been damaged). You might just shrug and boot your serviceable ISO from a USB, and have your PC back working fast, no big drama.

It is old news, but, just in case: you might already have a disk or partition for your operating system (C:) and some other for your data. That way, you can do anything to C: without fearing that you might lose much. That said, maybe you would like to keep some data stored by default in C: (like in the folder Appdata, withing Users\Your_user_name), in case some program kept something there that you wish to keep.

It is also generally better to start fresh, since that way you avoid carrying out problems from the older system. Additionally, you start with a clean slate where you can install the programs that you are really going to use. That way you avoid bloat. The trouble of installing the things that you are going to need, as you start needing them, generally pays off, instead of keeping all kinds of things that you forgot what they were for, or that are residues that you no longer need.
I use Acronis True Image to make a monthly image of my system drive. I can set that disk on fire, replace it with a new one and quickly restore everything like nothing ever happened. My PC hasn't seen a fresh install (Win10 on SSD) since the beginning (2016), and I haven't noticed any slowdown because of 'bloat'.
I agree, system slowdown happened in the past (older Windows + HDD), so I think your advice is a bit 'outdated'.
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teceem: I use blah blah
The theme of this thread is transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10, or from any other OS to W10. In such a transition, keeping stuff from W7/W8 that you no longer need (bloat indeed), registry inconsistencies included, does not make much sense, that is why a fresh install might be better, if the user can manage it, safely. In such a scenario, if any mistake was made, or some accident happened, keeping the bootable ISO makes the user safer

Re-read to notice why your post is a non sequitur, or, alternatively, fais moi la paix
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Carradice: The theme of this thread is transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10, or from any other OS to W10. In such a transition, keeping stuff from W7/W8 that you no longer need (bloat indeed), registry inconsistencies included, does not make much sense, that is why a fresh install might be better, if the user can manage it, safely. In such a scenario, if any mistake was made, or some accident happened, keeping the bootable ISO makes the user safer

Re-read to notice why your post is a non sequitur, or, alternatively, fais moi la paix
I didn't mention any 'transitioning' because upgrading from an older Windows to W10 and (features) updates withing W10 itself have a lot in common. They're both in essence 'fresh installs', but this time it can transfer most settings and software installations too. You say that that last part is worse than doing it manually, I say it isn't. Let's agree to disagree then.
Post edited September 21, 2020 by teceem
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Carradice: Well, with a bootable ISO you can run the installer,
Ah, I didn't realize one could boot from the ISO, like a boot disk. I thought the ISO and installer were just slightly different versions of the same thing. In that case, yes, the ISO is far more useful. I'll get a new copy.

It is also generally better to start fresh, since that way you avoid carrying out problems from the older system. Additionally, you start with a clean slate where you can install the programs that you are really going to use. That way you avoid bloat. The trouble of installing the things that you are going to need, as you start needing them, generally pays off, instead of keeping all kinds of things that you forgot what they were for, or that are residues that you no longer need.
I can understand the issue of bloat. When my XP was ending, I copied everything onto my new win7 hard drive. Now, I'm likely going to do the same thing with 10. While having a plain install and only adding what you need SOUNDS appealing, the problem is that I have files scattered everywhere, and no idea how to copy ONLY my files and nothing else. I can absolutely imagine years from now suddenly remembering files I want and not being able to find them, or worse, never remembering I had them to begin with. I just deleted two Gothic installs folders and at the last second, happened to look at a zip file in one of them and see it was a bunch of icons I made years ago. if I hadn't checked the folder, I would have deleted that work and never remembered I made them. So while bloat is definitely a legit concern, I feel much safer cloning the drive, bugs and all.

Separating the gold from the dross is like a plan to clean the whole house from top to bottom. Something I'll probably never actually do.