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Luckmann: Ran into this today, too. It's been hell for days. For me it was offset 83d, but I would never have found it without this thread's help. Kudos.

The fact that I can't find much about this bug makes me think that it's GOG-specific, just like the unresponsiveness of some of the movement keys.
The bug is being caused by using all seeing eye to teleport past several points in the game that don't allow rest - you are missing the flag that re-enables the ability to sleep.

Easy fix is to not warp around on the level with the lighting pads, the level that causes you nightmares and the level where you first meet Dran and he locks the door behind you.
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joonashgog: I took look at the save file and changed hex offset 83D from 1 to 0 and resting seems to work.

Download from here:
http://personal.inet.fi/koti/jhirvonen/ase/tmp/EOBDATA5.zip

I'll remove the file at some point so let me know if this works.

Check this site for further info on the EOB file formats etc. technical stuff:
http://eob.wikispaces.com

I think it's mostly on the Amiga versions though.
I know this is years later, but how do you figure these type of things out? You just saved my game, and others here, so thank you.
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joonashgog: I took look at the save file and changed hex offset 83D from 1 to 0 and resting seems to work.

Download from here:
http://personal.inet.fi/koti/jhirvonen/ase/tmp/EOBDATA5.zip

I'll remove the file at some point so let me know if this works.

Check this site for further info on the EOB file formats etc. technical stuff:
http://eob.wikispaces.com

I think it's mostly on the Amiga versions though.
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FabMan: I know this is years later, but how do you figure these type of things out? You just saved my game, and others here, so thank you.
The idea is something like this:
* Hypothesis: There is a flag, stored in the save file, that affects whether the player can rest.
* Find a place that doesn't allow resting.
* Make two save files, one in a place that does allow resting, and another that doesn't. Ideally, these save files should otherwise be the same, or at least as close as possible; we want to minimize spurious differences between the save files.
* Compare the two save files. This involves using tools to dump the save files in a format like hex. For example, on Linux, you could use the hexdump utility to dump the file, then use the diff utility to find differences. (In more complicated cases, you might write some custom code, or for in-memory stuff, use the search features of something like Cheat Engine or scanmem).
* Find a difference that looks like it could be a flag.
* Take a save file (maybe make a backup just in case), and use a hex editor to change the suspected flag. Then load the save file; if there's no checksum in the file, the save will load, but with that value different.
* Then, try to rest in the modified save, to check to see if the modification actually worked.
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FabMan: I know this is years later, but how do you figure these type of things out? You just saved my game, and others here, so thank you.
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dtgreene: The idea is something like this:
* Hypothesis: There is a flag, stored in the save file, that affects whether the player can rest.
* Find a place that doesn't allow resting.
* Make two save files, one in a place that does allow resting, and another that doesn't. Ideally, these save files should otherwise be the same, or at least as close as possible; we want to minimize spurious differences between the save files.
* Compare the two save files. This involves using tools to dump the save files in a format like hex. For example, on Linux, you could use the hexdump utility to dump the file, then use the diff utility to find differences. (In more complicated cases, you might write some custom code, or for in-memory stuff, use the search features of something like Cheat Engine or scanmem).
* Find a difference that looks like it could be a flag.
* Take a save file (maybe make a backup just in case), and use a hex editor to change the suspected flag. Then load the save file; if there's no checksum in the file, the save will load, but with that value different.
* Then, try to rest in the modified save, to check to see if the modification actually worked.
Thank you, that make sense. Reading your reply made me realise I did this as a kid with the Game Genie. Play the game, store values, lose a life, compare values, rinse and repeat until the Game Genie exposes a few possible lines that you can try modifying and then see if that provides the desired result. Thanks again.
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dtgreene: The idea is something like this:
* Hypothesis: There is a flag, stored in the save file, that affects whether the player can rest.
* Find a place that doesn't allow resting.
* Make two save files, one in a place that does allow resting, and another that doesn't. Ideally, these save files should otherwise be the same, or at least as close as possible; we want to minimize spurious differences between the save files.
* Compare the two save files. This involves using tools to dump the save files in a format like hex. For example, on Linux, you could use the hexdump utility to dump the file, then use the diff utility to find differences. (In more complicated cases, you might write some custom code, or for in-memory stuff, use the search features of something like Cheat Engine or scanmem).
* Find a difference that looks like it could be a flag.
* Take a save file (maybe make a backup just in case), and use a hex editor to change the suspected flag. Then load the save file; if there's no checksum in the file, the save will load, but with that value different.
* Then, try to rest in the modified save, to check to see if the modification actually worked.
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FabMan: Thank you, that make sense. Reading your reply made me realise I did this as a kid with the Game Genie. Play the game, store values, lose a life, compare values, rinse and repeat until the Game Genie exposes a few possible lines that you can try modifying and then see if that provides the desired result. Thanks again.
You're welcome.

This method isn't that different from what you would do in science. Find a variable to change, change that one variable, and do an experiment to test that change, to see if it actually does what you expect. So, I'd argue that it really is a variation of the scientific method.