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Yes, I did solve situations in a different manner with different characters, and I do appreciate this aspect of the game (being able to solve matters in varied ways), but then again the role playing aspect is also up to the players imagination and how immersed can he get in the game. I could not really immerse myself in the world of Arcanum because of my problems stated above, therefore I only saw game mechanics where I should have seen role playing.

But as I said, I do think the character creation and system is very good and involving. I am sort of curious about those certain plot twists though, so those could be part of the reasons that will make me pick up this game sometime again.
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Waltorious: I stand by my statement (in that other thread you mentioned) that the main plot gets a lot more interesting. But you have to get farther in the game before that stuff starts to appear. Even in the early stages there was stuff that I liked, though, especially the way the different races were handled. Dwarven and Elven societies are both remarkably different from the human cities, but I was disappointed that there wasn't more done with gnomes and halflings.

Side quests are indeed fairly standard, although there are lots of ways to solve them, only a few of which will likely be available to any given character. You mentioned you tried several different character builds... but did you try actually doing different things? Did you try being evil? Mercenary? Forgoing material reward in the name of virtue? The game really adapts to roleplaying in different ways, rather than just different character mechanics.

That said, your complaints are valid, and if you're not enjoying yourself enough to press on then you probably shouldn't. Arcanum definitely demands more investment from the player than many games do.
The Halflings were basically nonexistant, but there was some interesting Gnome stuff, particularly in the [Spoiler] of the [spoiler] sidequest chain.
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Gazoinks: The Halflings were basically nonexistant, but there was some interesting Gnome stuff, particularly in the [Spoiler] of the [spoiler] sidequest chain.
Yeah, after I posted that I started wondering if I'd just missed out on some of that stuff because of the choices my character made.
I began to play it myself a day or two ago and I must say, so far I've been able to "come by" because of luck and interesting but temporary opportunities.

It's a pity these old cRPGs never had in-game tutorials rather than requiring you to read a bunch of texts. It's a lot more interesting to sit down an hour or two to see the game mechanics for yourself rather than be given a book of 200 pages and someone says "read this and then play".
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Nirth: I began to play it myself a day or two ago and I must say, so far I've been able to "come by" because of luck and interesting but temporary opportunities.

It's a pity these old cRPGs never had in-game tutorials rather than requiring you to read a bunch of texts. It's a lot more interesting to sit down an hour or two to see the game mechanics for yourself rather than be given a book of 200 pages and someone says "read this and then play".
exactly. not to mention the absurdity of that 200 page book having to be read on a computer screen.
The best way to self-teach yourself any RPG is to start with a behemoth of a character that has nothing but strength and combat, that way you can survive most battles while you figure out the game.

The first time I played Arcanum, I'm ashamed to admit it wasn't quite legitimately, so I too had no manual, but I persevered instead of rage-quitting and it became the greatest RPG I have ever played, I've completed it about 14 times now. It's probably the only RPG where I genuinely do find new places and people and quests on every playthrough.