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Updated 01/20/2015: Added Timbres of Heaven 3.0 (thanks herecomethe2000)

I found a driver that works great for MIDI Driver switching + SoundFont Support in Windows 7/8/8.1:
http://coolsoft.altervista.org/en/virtualmidisynth#download

Here is a page with some SoundFonts you can download:
Pages with lists of various SoundFont files that are freely available, standouts seem to be Weeds, FluidR3, Crisis, by all means try them all, everyone's tastes are different.
http://coolsoft.altervista.org/en/virtualmidisynth#soundfonts
https://www.kode54.net/bassmididrv/BASSMIDI_Driver_Installation_and_Configuration.htm

Timbres of Heaven recommended by (herecomethe2000)
http://www.mediafire.com/download/6u6x2j6iw0azqet/Timbres+Of+Heaven+GM_GS_XG_SFX+V+3.0+Final+!!!.7z

A couple recommends by (timppu)
"Chorium Revision A" SoundFont, by Open World (28.9 megabytes)
http://www.un4seen.com/download.php?extra/ChoriumRevA.rar
"Roland SC-55 v1.1 (GM.dls)" Sound Canvas SoundFont, by DJ Tony (9.9 megabytes) *
http://www.mediafire.com/?a6qn1tc811b2ce1

PrincessSoft SF2, DonateWare: I haven't tried this, perhaps someone can chime in:
http://princesssoftsf2.altervista.org/Inglese/index1.html

If you would like MT-32 support, you can install Munt in windows and use VirtualMIDISynth to switch
to that driver when you want to play an MT-32 game (X-Wing 1993 is)
Munt: http://sourceforge.net/projects/munt/

Here's some information on MT-32 in the thread:
MT-32 instructions/pro+con (timppu)
http://www.gog.com/forum/star_wars_xwing_special_edition/get_dramatically_better_midi_music/post23

MT-32 Comparison (ikantspelwurdz):
http://sound.dosforum.de/
http://www.gog.com/forum/star_wars_xwing_special_edition/get_dramatically_better_midi_music/post16

If you have something you think I could add to this OP to make life easier and improve the quality of playing these games (and any GoG with MIDI music for that matter, pop me a message!) Peruse the thread there's a ton of great info here.

Have fun!
Post edited January 21, 2015 by hfm
There I was thinking about whether I went with 4-OP FM, Roland (using Munt) or General Midi.

Now you've made the choice even more complicated :)
X-Wing was composed with an MT-32, so you'll want to use MT-32 mode with Munt. Three notes:
- General MIDI mode actually uses different music tracks than MT-32 mode does. The tracks for General MIDI are converted from the MT-32 tracks, and have lost some of their richness and complexity.
- Only the 1993 FLOPPY version of X-Wing has the original MT-32 tracks. The 1994 CD-ROM version only has the General MIDI tracks, which are used even in MT-32 mode. I understand that the version on GOG is the floppy version, so you'll be fine here.
- If you have an original Roland MT-32 module, the "old" revision, X-Wing will make it lock up. You can work around it by using an SVN build of DOSBox and enabling delaysysex. This is not a problem with Munt, or any revision of the MT-32 other than the original "old" module.

TIE Fighter was composed with a Roland SC-55, which is a true General MIDI device. So for that use General MIDI and whatever sound font you like. General MIDI is nice and flexible like that. Unlike X-Wing, the 1995 CD-ROM version has the exact same music as the floppy version.
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ikantspelwurdz: - Only the 1993 FLOPPY version of X-Wing has the original MT-32 tracks. The 1994 CD-ROM version only has the General MIDI tracks, which are used even in MT-32 mode. I understand that the version on GOG is the floppy version, so you'll be fine here.
Oh yeah, that explains the terrible results I had with MUNT when playing my CD-ROM version.
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hfm: I personally like the SGM V2.01 SoundFont, but everyone's tastes are different.
Yeah, I definitely prefer FluidR3. It just has a juicier and richer overall sound IMO.

Just listen to it:
Ultima 3
Abuse

By far the most awesome SoundFont I have found yet.

Btw: How did you end up using VirtualMIDISynth? Most people prefer and recommend other tools while VirtualMIDISynth has been my tool of choice for this stuff for years and it always seemed like I'm alone with that. :D
Post edited October 29, 2014 by F4LL0UT
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ikantspelwurdz: X-Wing was composed with an MT-32, so you'll want to use MT-32 mode with Munt. Three notes:
- General MIDI mode actually uses different music tracks than MT-32 mode does. The tracks for General MIDI are converted from the MT-32 tracks, and have lost some of their richness and complexity.
Please forgive my ignorance, but can someone explain Munt vs. MIDI, or how you'd choose between the two?
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boris152: Please forgive my ignorance, but can someone explain Munt vs. MIDI, or how you'd choose between the two?
MUNT is also MIDI but let me explain: most typically MIDI music is composed for General MIDI devices. That's a standard among tons of soundcards and other devices so despite any technical differences the result will be *roughly* the same. So if the music file says that that a certain note should be played by a trumpet it will be played by a trumpet on all General MIDI devices - what this trumpet sounds like *exactly* will depend on the specific configuration you have, though (and the method described by OP allows you to easily exchange that General MIDI sound on Windows).

Now, in the late 80's and early 90's the Roland MT-32 soundcard was comparably popular which is NOT General MIDI compliant (but it *does* use MIDI). But the MT-32 was an insanely powerful synthesizer with amazing capabilities and there's a bunch of games out there (especially by Sierra and LucasArts) with soundtracks composed specifically for this soundcard (or at least where the MT-32 had total priority) and you will be missing out if you're using a General MIDI device instead of an MT-32. And MUNT happens to be a MT-32 emulator that allows you to get a decent MT-32 experience without owning the actual hardware.

So only use MUNT if you play a game that has a soundtrack specifically composed for it. You can reference this list if you want to find them. Note that the entries with "General MIDI" in brackets only additionally support the MT-32 but were mainly composed for General MIDI and will probably sound best on a GM device.

Anyway, to use MUNT with DOSBox you will need to set DOSBox' MIDI device to "mt32" and use a tool like VirtualMIDISynth to be able to switch freely between MUNT and General MIDI devices.
Post edited October 31, 2014 by F4LL0UT
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ikantspelwurdz: - Only the 1993 FLOPPY version of X-Wing has the original MT-32 tracks. The 1994 CD-ROM version only has the General MIDI tracks, which are used even in MT-32 mode. I understand that the version on GOG is the floppy version, so you'll be fine here.
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F4LL0UT: Oh yeah, that explains the terrible results I had with MUNT when playing my CD-ROM version.
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hfm: I personally like the SGM V2.01 SoundFont, but everyone's tastes are different.
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F4LL0UT: Yeah, I definitely prefer FluidR3. It just has a juicier and richer overall sound IMO.

Just listen to it:
Ultima 3
Abuse

By far the most awesome SoundFont I have found yet.

Btw: How did you end up using VirtualMIDISynth? Most people prefer and recommend other tools while VirtualMIDISynth has been my tool of choice for this stuff for years and it always seemed like I'm alone with that. :D
I stuck with Crisis, I like the quality and balance in that one. There were a couple of instruments in Fluid that seemed a little overly harsh.

I was thinking of ponying up the donation for PrincessSoft SF2 to check that out:
http://princesssoftsf2.altervista.org/Inglese/index1.html

As for how I found it, I wasn't happy with the quality of the music and figured there must be a driver for Windows 8/8.1 that will allow me to use soundfonts and tweak some other settings. Stumbled on it and was blown away by the results.

I used to have the daughter board on my old SB AWE 32, I remember buying that thing specifically for getting better music in DooM. :)
Post edited October 29, 2014 by hfm
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hfm: As for how I found it, I wasn't happy with the quality of the music and figured there must be a driver for Windows 8/8.1 that will allow me to use soundfonts and tweak some other settings. Stumbled on it and was blown away by the results.
For a second I thought I had a reason to be proud. I once posted a tutorial similar to yours on my website and chose to recommend VirtualMIDISynth instead of the stuff most people seem to use. The article had a decent amount of views before the page broke (50k I think), was hoping you might have picked it up there. ^^
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ikantspelwurdz: - Only the 1993 FLOPPY version of X-Wing has the original MT-32 tracks. The 1994 CD-ROM version only has the General MIDI tracks, which are used even in MT-32 mode. I understand that the version on GOG is the floppy version, so you'll be fine here.
If I had a CD-ROM version, but had bought the Floppy version here from GoG, would I be able to copy the files from the Floppy version into my MUSIC folder on my CD-ROM install?
I just had to come back in here and say thank you for this post, and to everyone who has contributed to it. I don't know why it never dawned on me that someone out there had written an MT-32 and/or proper GM emulator before now, but it just never did.

But now I'm all set up and running, and enjoying 20+ years of games in the way that I always wanted to, but never could. I just didn't have to money to plop down on an MT-32 or fancy General MIDI rig back in the day, but I'd always read reviews about how great this game or that game sounded on non-Adlib/SB sound cards, but the closest I ever got to it was a Gravis Ultrasound a friend of mine had.

So thank you, thank you, thank you. Monkey Island finally sounds like it was always supposed to (even though I adored it on my Sound Blaster, as it's the first game I got after I finally got an SB.)
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ikantspelwurdz: - Only the 1993 FLOPPY version of X-Wing has the original MT-32 tracks. The 1994 CD-ROM version only has the General MIDI tracks, which are used even in MT-32 mode. I understand that the version on GOG is the floppy version, so you'll be fine here.
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RecklessPrudence: If I had a CD-ROM version, but had bought the Floppy version here from GoG, would I be able to copy the files from the Floppy version into my MUSIC folder on my CD-ROM install?
Doubtful. I've got both versions myself, and I'm sure I tried that at some point and quickly gave up.

I am pretty sure that the two versions use different file formats for music - neither use straight .mid files. I am also pretty sure that the floppy version depends on SYSEX messages and custom sounds in order to sound right on an MT-32, while I suspect the CD-ROM version just uses the default device sounds. In other words, I don't think the CD-ROM version even has the programming to use the MT-32 tracks correctly.
Made a MUNT video installation guide a while ago. It shows how to setup MUNT for DOSBox games:

http://youtu.be/j_5RWxHHVvE
Post edited October 30, 2014 by Mau1wurf1977
Do I need to do anything besides install VirtualMIDISynth and download+set a soundfont in the Configurator?
For a General MIDI soundfont, I vote for Chorium rev.A. To me it gives overall the best music in General MIDI games.
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tarasis: There I was thinking about whether I went with 4-OP FM, Roland (using Munt) or General Midi.

Now you've made the choice even more complicated :)
You'd be missing some great music. I remember when I played X-Wing the first time, I played it with Roland (LAPC-1), and I was in awe.

A bit later I bought also a Roland SCC-1 sound card, and I couldn't believe X-Wing sounded even better with it (using the General MIDI option). Frankly, it made the Roland music (in that particular game) sound a bit poor. :)
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ikantspelwurdz: X-Wing was composed with an MT-32, so you'll want to use MT-32 mode with Munt.
Odd. As I said, I definitely found X-Wing music superior with Roland SCC-1 (using General MIDI), as opposed to Roland LAPC-1 which is what I originally played it with. This was the floppy version back in the 90s..

The Roland music was not bad, but being orchestral music, it really seemed to benefit from the more realistic and clearer instruments of SCC-1.

Maybe I'll try it again today, been awhile...