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valkyrieca: A little confused on the Scient's 2.1 patch. Is there an installer somewhere that I am missing in the files? Or am I just directly overwriting the SMAC files in the GOG directory with what is in what I downloaded.
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Links: It's right there in the page I posted:
https://github.com/DrazharLn/scient-unofficial-smacx-patch/releases/download/v2.1/SMACX_UP_v2.1_Installer.exe
Thanks for that, I think it applied properly, cant see any version number in game though. Appreciate it!
Just a warning, these patches may trigger antivirus software
(DrWeb engine for example detects trojan injectors in Scient and Yitzi's patches)
Post edited June 14, 2020 by Sten_MkIIs
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Sten_MkIIs: Just a warning, these patches may trigger antivirus software
(DrWeb engine for example detects trojan injectors in Scient and Yitzi's patches)
Thank you for the warning. But...is there a good valid reason why these should be detected that way? It seems to me that simple game patches of the type these are, how they work and what they purport to do for the game, should never be flagged by anti-virus software. Seems very odd to me.
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Sten_MkIIs: Just a warning, these patches may trigger antivirus software
(DrWeb engine for example detects trojan injectors in Scient and Yitzi's patches)
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jigglywiggly: Thank you for the warning. But...is there a good valid reason why these should be detected that way? It seems to me that simple game patches of the type these are, how they work and what they purport to do for the game, should never be flagged by anti-virus software. Seems very odd to me.
Probably, it's patcher code in .exe file that sets off alarm.
I checked loose files of unofficial pathes (github) with same DrWeb scanner - they are clean.
Post edited August 06, 2020 by Sten_MkIIs
I think some antivirus software take a "better safe than sorry" approach and are very likely to flag as a threat .exe files that are not too common. We have had cases in which a newly released installer by GOG gave a false positive. They must have a database fed by their users' analysis, since over time these files become "trusted".