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NWN1 has some horrendous design decisions in XP... namely:
1. Familiars horrendously drain your XP
2. Animal companions horrendously drain your XP.
3. Summons horrendously drain your XP.
4. Henchmen horrendously drain your XP.
5. Certain type of multi classing horrendously drain your XP.

Each and every one of those is utterly moronic and drastically reduces the enjoyment one can have from the game...
anyone knows of a script/mod/hak whatever that eliminates any or all of those?
This question / problem has been solved by ERISSimage
Play solo with a carefully planned build.

Essentially you're asking for a cheat, so you can have 5 zillion other characters helping yours and choose any combination you want without making any real choices.

This is the strategic part of the game. Use summons and familiars when you need them. Dismiss them when you don't. Pick a race with a favored class that matches your desired first one, so you can match others without penalty. It's really not as hard as you're making it out to be.
Playing with the 3.5 rules can fix many flaws as NWN is based is the not so good D&D3 (but far best than previous versions of D&D).
Q: How do I simulate the BioWare xp system but without henchman xp penalties?

A: You will need to set the variables to the following:

CustomXP=1
CustomXPSlider=10
CustomXPMaxGroupBonus=100
CustomXPMaxXP=0
CustomXpRadius=60
CustomXPDiffPen=0

Besides not losing xp from pets, all classes will gain the same xp. Mages will no longer be treated as lower level than they actually are.
Post edited November 04, 2010 by ERISS
@ERISS:
Thank you, who are you quoting though and where do i set those variables? in the console? in the module? do i need to edit the module i am play with the toolset with the custom variables you mentioned to remove said penalties for that module only?

EDIT:
I found the answer... thanks to googling the exact sentence you quoted and then doing some detective work...

what you quote are instructions from the faq of the following hak pack:
http://nwvault.ign.com/View.php?view=hakpaks.detail&id=5646

you need to:
1. make a custom module
2. integrate that hak pack with that custom module
3. set the variables as described there for said custom module.
Post edited November 04, 2010 by taltamir
I believe you can just put that in the override folder, not modify every module with a hak pack. Then it will affect everything you play.
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CheeseshireCat: I believe you can just put that in the override folder, not modify every module with a hak pack. Then it will affect everything you play.
the problem with that, is that by default that hak does not modify XP gain, it is an optional feature that must be enabled on a module by module basis.
if you put it in the override, all the non optional and all the "on by default" optional features will be enabled, but not off by default optional features.
I did not understand a thing, you wrote over the items to change in the scrips.
just where are these voices?
for the precision I mean these
CustomXP = 1
CustomXPSlider = 10
CustomXPMaxGroupBonus = 100
CustomXPMaxXP = 0
CustomXpRadius = 60
CustomXPDiffPen = 0
Additional party members reduce the amount of XP awarded to the PC by approximately 10-15% per member but small awards round down so seem inflated. If you know the ballpark maximum party size, open the module properties in the toolset and move the XP Scale slider an amount to compensate toward the right like shown at http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/XP_scale

Multiclassing differences only occur if the content has implemented an ECL bias like the NWN plague campaign did/does like shown at http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/Effective_character_level . The expansions or premiums do not use ECL.

Most modules and PWs do not use an algorithm like this and award XP strictly from the PC Level-to-Creature CR delta.
Post edited January 14, 2017 by Chipster
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Chipster: Multiclassing differences only occur if the content has implemented an ECL bias like the NWN plague campaign did/does like shown at http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/Effective_character_level . The expansions or premiums do not use ECL.
I am pretty sure it wasn't the minor ECL multiclass difference that was mentioned.

But the Multiclass penalty for mismatched levels, especially among non humans.


A Dwarven Ranger 5, Paladin 5, Rogue 5 has No Penalty.
A Dwarven Ranger 6, Paladin 7, Rogue 2 has 20% Penalty.
A Dwarven Ranger 2, Paladin 4, Rogue 9 has 40% Penalty.

http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/Multiclass_penalty
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Chipster: Multiclassing differences only occur if the content has implemented an ECL bias like the NWN plague campaign did/does like shown at http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/Effective_character_level . The expansions or premiums do not use ECL.
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PeterScott: I am pretty sure it wasn't the minor ECL multiclass difference that was mentioned.

But the Multiclass penalty for mismatched levels, especially among non humans.

A Dwarven Ranger 5, Paladin 5, Rogue 5 has No Penalty.
A Dwarven Ranger 6, Paladin 7, Rogue 2 has 20% Penalty.
A Dwarven Ranger 2, Paladin 4, Rogue 9 has 40% Penalty.

http://nwn.wikia.com/wiki/Multiclass_penalty
Then his complaint isn't limited to NWN in that case. That's AD&D 3.0 (and NWN2 3.5e as well) so perhaps he should shop around for a game that isn't based on Dungeons and Dragons. ECL is NWN's version of class balancing but it never gets used anymore.
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Chipster: Then his complaint isn't limited to NWN in that case. That's AD&D 3.0 (and NWN2 3.5e as well) so perhaps he should shop around for a game that isn't based on Dungeons and Dragons. ECL is NWN's version of class balancing but it never gets used anymore.
Yes, but the OP was essentially just looking to cheat, removing all XP penalties that were done with an eye towards balancing the game.
Guys, I played NWN but never playerd D&D, so I did not know that allies cause XP penalty.


Could you guys explain to me how this works? I mean, I play with a Druid with my companion and sumons everytime I can, so what's happen to my XP?
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Ronanfalcon: Guys, I played NWN but never playerd D&D, so I did not know that allies cause XP penalty.

Could you guys explain to me how this works? I mean, I play with a Druid with my companion and sumons everytime I can, so what's happen to my XP?
I believe this link explains everything you need. Especially check the table in the end.
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Ronanfalcon: Guys, I played NWN but never playerd D&D, so I did not know that allies cause XP penalty.

Could you guys explain to me how this works? I mean, I play with a Druid with my companion and sumons everytime I can, so what's happen to my XP?
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Engerek01: I believe this link explains everything you need. Especially check the table in the end.
It's actually pretty generous compared to what I remember from PnP (AD&D).

Which was straight up division. If you killed a monsters worth 100 XP:

1 character alone would get 100xp
2 characters would get 50xp each.
5 characters would get 20xp each.
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Engerek01: I believe this link explains everything you need. Especially check the table in the end.
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PeterScott: It's actually pretty generous compared to what I remember from PnP (AD&D).

Which was straight up division. If you killed a monsters worth 100 XP:

1 character alone would get 100xp
2 characters would get 50xp each.
5 characters would get 20xp each.
Except that, in PnP, this only counts permanent characters (like PCs and henchmen), and not summons (who don't get XP (not that it matters), but don't count against the party size).

Also, in 3e (but not 3.5e), if you add a lower level character to the party, the rest of the party will actually get *more* XP due to XP awards being based on average party level, and not the individual character's party level. (Of note, in Icewind Dale 2, XP works as in 3e, allowing for this sort of exploit, and the rule against gaining multiple levels at once isn't implemented, allowing you to get tons of XP if you delay leveling and only level up some characters.)

Also, starting with 3e, the "A" ("Advanced") was removed from the acronym, so it's now just "D&D".