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Normally I'm very appreciative of Good Old Games for making some of their stock free, but I feel they owe me money for playing Lure of the Temptress. I can safely say it's probably the most annoying, frustrating game I've ever played. I won't say it's the worst game ever--The Wife makes fun of me for reading Retro Gamer, and there's talk in there about games so buggy they can't even be completed--but Lure of the Temptress has to rank up there somewhere.

At its core, LotT is a standard point-and-click "adventure" game with a generic medieval theme. You control a character who has taken it upon himself to free a small village from the domination of an evil witch. Not winning prizes for originality, even if the game writers think they're clever by treating their own plot with contempt. Anyway, the reason LofT is both innovative and infuriating is because it contains the first incarnation of Revolution Software's "Virtual Theatre." Virtual Theatre is a concept that would be used quite well in a later game, Beneath a Steel Sky; the idea is that everyone in the game has their own lives to attend to, so instead of standing in a fixed position waiting for the player's character to stop by, they go to work, go shopping, have conversations with other computer-controlled characters, etc. The idea of trying to make the game world "realistic" is a good one, but in LofT it's a disaster. The main problem is that whenever two characters physically bump into each other, something that happens with annoying frequency, they stop, say "excuse me", and then wander all over the screen. The screen is thus likely to be filled with annoying chatter, and any attempt to get your character to go somewhere is a long and frustrating process. It's bad if there's two characters on the screen, but just wait if there happens to be four or five! Even worse, for some reason the movement routines are off, and just telling your character to talk to another character on an otherwise empty screen could involve long, circuitous, senseless walking that ends up not working. Something simple, like opening a door, could take four or five tries. It's like a terrible comedy sketch, and it's the first game I've played where I thought Rifftrax should have a go.

I'm a completist at heart, and found I could only stand the game for a few minutes at a time. Because the movement system is so annoying, the normal sort of exploration and trial-and-error of adventure games is definitely not fun. With my patience at a minimum, I happily resorted to walkthroughs more readily than normal.* But in any event, I have now finished the game and never have to play it again. I have learned a valuable lesson: just because it's free, doesn't mean you have to take it.

SPOILERS

* Places I got stuck: (1) Finding the forge: It's obvious when you know what to look for, but I kept walking past it and had to rely on a YouTube walkthrough!; (2) The alchemist equipment: I examined the diary loads of times, but never whilst in the laboratory--and that's the only way the burner becomes visible; (3) Getting Luthern to drink what's in the flask to empty it out; (4) Talking to Ultar twice to get the gargoyles' names; (5) Looking through the window just when the Skorl is revealing his plan.
That's the way experiences differ… I agree that the characters bumping into each other can become a bit too much at times, and that pathfinding was not exactly figured out yet. However, I found those to be very minor annoyances within the first minutes of play. I quickly got used to having to control my character a bit more closely, and any unnecessary greeting dialogue is clicked away immediately. I didn't really give it a second thought after a while, and before I knew it the game was over. (Funny thing, I thought I was playing the limited demo, and my growing amazement at how long a demo it was suddenly turned into amazement at how short the full game is :))

It's certainly not the pinnacle of the genre, it's a bit too generic, unpolished, and at times random for that. But I found it to be an enjoyable quick play. I probably would've been a bit disappointed had I bought it full-price back in the day, it's more along the size and scope of Freeware adventures of the day. But overall, not bad.

SPOILER point (3) has to be one of the most inane puzzles I've ever seen in any game. Just turn the bloody thing over, darn it! =D
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Jhaeman: Normally I'm very appreciative of Good Old Games for making some of their stock free, but I feel they owe me money for playing Lure of the Temptress. I can safely say it's probably the most annoying, frustrating game I've ever played. I won't say it's the worst game ever--The Wife makes fun of me for reading Retro Gamer, and there's talk in there about games so buggy they can't even be completed--but Lure of the Temptress has to rank up there somewhere.

At its core, LotT is a standard point-and-click "adventure" game with a generic medieval theme. You control a character who has taken it upon himself to free a small village from the domination of an evil witch. Not winning prizes for originality, even if the game writers think they're clever by treating their own plot with contempt. Anyway, the reason LofT is both innovative and infuriating is because it contains the first incarnation of Revolution Software's "Virtual Theatre." Virtual Theatre is a concept that would be used quite well in a later game, Beneath a Steel Sky; the idea is that everyone in the game has their own lives to attend to, so instead of standing in a fixed position waiting for the player's character to stop by, they go to work, go shopping, have conversations with other computer-controlled characters, etc. The idea of trying to make the game world "realistic" is a good one, but in LofT it's a disaster. The main problem is that whenever two characters physically bump into each other, something that happens with annoying frequency, they stop, say "excuse me", and then wander all over the screen. The screen is thus likely to be filled with annoying chatter, and any attempt to get your character to go somewhere is a long and frustrating process. It's bad if there's two characters on the screen, but just wait if there happens to be four or five! Even worse, for some reason the movement routines are off, and just telling your character to talk to another character on an otherwise empty screen could involve long, circuitous, senseless walking that ends up not working. Something simple, like opening a door, could take four or five tries. It's like a terrible comedy sketch, and it's the first game I've played where I thought Rifftrax should have a go.

I'm a completist at heart, and found I could only stand the game for a few minutes at a time. Because the movement system is so annoying, the normal sort of exploration and trial-and-error of adventure games is definitely not fun. With my patience at a minimum, I happily resorted to walkthroughs more readily than normal.* But in any event, I have now finished the game and never have to play it again. I have learned a valuable lesson: just because it's free, doesn't mean you have to take it.

SPOILERS

* Places I got stuck: (1) Finding the forge: It's obvious when you know what to look for, but I kept walking past it and had to rely on a YouTube walkthrough!; (2) The alchemist equipment: I examined the diary loads of times, but never whilst in the laboratory--and that's the only way the burner becomes visible; (3) Getting Luthern to drink what's in the flask to empty it out; (4) Talking to Ultar twice to get the gargoyles' names; (5) Looking through the window just when the Skorl is revealing his plan.
My feelings as well. The movement is the one of the clunkiest I've ever seen, even for a point-and-click game. The random dialogue between NPCs often interrupt your own dialogues, and your follower (Ratpouch, was it?) seems to corroborate to the chaotic gibberish covering your screen. And about the Blacksmith's place... It is completely HIDDEN from anyone looking for a store, a forge, an anvil, whatever. There isn't even a single sign telling you that there's a blacksmith shop there. I mean - COME ON! it's a blacksmith shop!! How the guy is supposed to sell anything without a proper SIGN?!

But the main annoyance for me happened when I had to reset my save due to a dumb glitch involving guess who... the retarded follower. His well-written algorithms told him to enter and leave the same screen in an endless loop, preventing me from picking "that lock" for all the eternity (*spoilers!*).

So... yeah. One of the most unpleasant experiences I've ever had in gaming lately... and to think that some poor souls actually spent money on this game back in the 90s gives me the shivers.
Same. Same. Same. The only reason I will tell someone to play the game is to talk to Ratpouch (that's the name, isn't it?). Some jokes he tells made me laugh. Other than that, this game feels more like a beta testing ground for Virtual Theatre.
I think is a game that didnt gett old in a good way, nowadays I only find enjoyable the "jail" part... all the adventure in the town is annoying and with some "broken" issues and glitches/bugs.

Also is short, bad paced, and graphics aged horrible, sound even worse. So yeah, I agree with OP... but, it is free and runs on my ASUS Netbook.
Unfortunately, SCUMMVM uses a (very) broken "reverse engineered" engine for playing this game (even in the latest builds), and this effects both the music/sound effects, and the general gameplay.

You really need to play this game in DOSBox with MUNT (either built-in or via the downloadable MUNT device driver) and the CM32L ROMs (must be the CM32L ROMs for highest quality sound effects and music)

The music and sound effects are some of the best ever for a game of this era using only MIDI (not using digital PCM playback) when CM32L compatible hardware/software is used.

Check it out again under DOSBox with MUNT and the CM32L ROMs - make sure you turn up your volume, and you'll be pleasantly surprised

And your gameplay experience will be somewhat better as well without all the (many) bugs introduced by the "reverse engineered very broken" SCUMMVM version. Sure, some of the basic design choices are still annoying (pathfinding/dialogue interruption/overlaying/hidden blacksmith) but many of these other bugs you experienced are simply not present (not using the buggy broken SCUMMVM game engine).

Enjoy.
Hi guys !

Reading you remind me the same feelings as yours I got while I was playing the game for the first time : strange sounds and clunkies movements.

But, after finishing the game I looked for a kind of "Let's play" on Youtube about this game because I was so much wondered about those problems.

So I found that kind of let's play : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxJLMsIDork

And so I discovered there were an Amiga version of the game wich look a way lot better than the PC version that Gog gives us. The movements seem to be more "direct" and the sounds are better coordinate.

I realized that the version Gog gives us is a mediocre adaptation of the game, which looks more acceptable in its amiga version.

Hopefully, Gog seems to bring us some new old games in their amiga version. Maybe can we make a "community wishlist" to get the better version of Lure of the temptress.

Naev.
The thread title makes me curious... Now I'm gonna play it more than ever! :)
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Naev: And so I discovered there were an Amiga version of the game wich look a way lot better than the PC version that Gog gives us. The movements seem to be more "direct" and the sounds are better coordinate.
Having played the original on my old trusty Amiga 500 back in the day, I can confirm this. I actually got quite bit of enjoyment out of the game then, it wasn't half as bad as the PC version even though you still could get stuck occasionally. If only they sold new Amigas and 50hz CRT monitors nowadays... :)
i have fond memories of my friends having this on their amiga (bootleg copies of course).

and i had the PC-demo from a cover disk, which was the intro and the dungeon chapter.

i was a teen with hardly any games and i played da-b-jeesus out of that demo. Until i saved up enough to buy the full game on budget some time later. I finished it in a single sitting in one day.
The other budged titles i owened were Star-Trek Judgement rights, Another World, Space Quest 3.
Big games like monkey island 2, Xwing, Wing Commander would max/chew up significant parts my hard-disk. limiting to what games "big" and selection of little games could play at any one time. So When i got a game, or a demo that could fit on the side of the bigger games, it got played to-death.

Every-time i 'want' to go back because of my quaint nostalgia - I suck up the boredom and crack through the dungeon section which required huge amounts of will power. And When i do succeed, as i come clamber out and the game world opens up, i shudder and switch off. i don't know why either.

It is rather sweet that it is played straight as it is., not a parody, or a comic game like it's peers. It is a quaint puzzle game. Despite being rather generic, tropey and clichéd by todays standard (or even already by late 90's), is played up straight in the naive early 90's and is punctuated with moments of funny. Later games of the 90's would insecurely poke fun at themselves for living out the generic tropes. (although the barbarian does do this). And that makes this game charming.

The fact characters could move around and could be ordered around, was a breakthrough, and was thought to be the "break-through" immersion-fullfilling-game that every other adventure game would follow.
By Beneath a steel sky, they pretty much axed that concept and had characters stationary in their locations.

It's a shame because a remake or touching up the game would barely improve it. I've often considered if there was ever a faithful remake how all this effort to make "Turnvale" work, as that village and it's inhabitants is the center-piece of the game. (although having a magic cave system with dragon and castle, whilst being walled in, seams....odd.)
The dialogue was always, peculiar - too simple and effective.
But the jokes, were always a little odd., sometimes you didn't know if they were supposed to be jokes at all, or character building, because most of the humour was based around simple-folk, not being too bright and also being very naive to their surroundings and events they were caught up in.
like most games I've bought on GOG - it's there to preserve the lost games from failed Hard-Disk backups or floppies that don't work.
I don't intend to play them so much - just for the simple fact, game design (and QA) has come along leaps and bounds since them.
Post edited April 21, 2015 by go_boff
I think this game is great, though I haven't played it in a long while.
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Jhaeman: And about the Blacksmith's place... It is completely HIDDEN from anyone looking for a store, a forge, an anvil, whatever. There isn't even a single sign telling you that there's a blacksmith shop there. I mean - COME ON! it's a blacksmith shop!! How the guy is supposed to sell anything without a proper SIGN?!
I was curious about this myself. Only today after I installed the MT-32 stuff I figured this out. When go anywhere near his place you hear a distinctive hammer-on-anvil sound which makes it quite obvious.
Lure of the Temptress is a great game and was well regarded in the gaming press and by any gamers I knew at the time who played it. It was the go-to non-Lucasarts suggestion for point and click adventure games. Try playing it via Amiga emulation. Amiga emulation is really easy to do compared to Doxbox tinkering, so if you can manage other emulators you can run Amiga emulation without problems. Many old games of a certain era looked or sounded best on the Amiga anyway.
Post edited August 05, 2015 by Fezred
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Hofbrau: Unfortunately, SCUMMVM uses a (very) broken "reverse engineered" engine for playing this game (even in the latest builds), and this effects both the music/sound effects, and the general gameplay.
If there are still gameplay bugs in ScummVM, could you please add bug reports for the problems. We can't fix bugs in the game under ScummVM, unless they are actually reported.

The music and sound effects issues will hopefully be fixed in the long term.
I loved this game on the Amiga because unlike most point and clicks it had a fairly adult theme to it, and that intro gave me shivers. More so with Amiga sound than the plinky plonk midi of DOS.

Curse of Enchantia, Legend of Kyrandia and Lure of the Temptress were the three big names of fantasy point and click unless you were a fan of that points-based Sierra Quest nonsense.