It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like:Chrome,Firefox,Internet Explorer orOpera

×
arrow-down2arrowcart2close4fat-arrow-leftfat-arrow-rightfeedbackfriends2happy-facelogo-gognotificationnotifications-emptyownedremove-menusad-facesearch2wishlist-menuwishlisted2own_thingsheartstartick
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/mar/23/police-complaint-enders-game

A teacher in Aiken, South Carolina is on administrative suspension after being the subject of a police investigation. The investigation was initiated by a parent complaining after a "teacher at the school reportedly read to his class from the novel. The parent described Ender's Game as "pornographic" and complained about its subject matter."....

Tough the police investigation is closed and they found that the teacher did not do anything criminal (thank god) the teacher is still on leave as the school investigation is still ongoing.

Ender's Game pornographic? Did I miss some pages?
Ok, I've ignored Ender's books for long time. It's time to change that.
Hmmm I don't remember any sex at all actually, but maybe my mind is just so perverted that it didn't register.
I'm sure there was a mix up with A Game of Thrones.

Oh God yes the next season is just around the corner.
Post edited March 23, 2012 by Titanium
Seriously, if Ender's game is considered pornographic, then we could just as well ban the bible from schools, for containing the Song of Solomon.
There is a lot of nudity and naked fighting and junk in the books. I can see how a parent could be upset. Especially if the teacher just read certain sections without their context.

14 isn't too young to read Ender's Game as a whole (I was 14 when I read it unscathed).

I think some parents have issues with their child seeing anything negative. I understand the idea, but disagree with it. When we read about heroes who have to defend their lives and others while being stripped naked in a hot shower with other boys, it makes that hero more real, more heroic, more tangible.

If that scene is in a book, it's digestible. If it was in a movie, it'd be pornographic and inappropriate and damaging (I'm still damaged from a very similar scene from Eastern Promises). And if it happened in real life, we'd be curled up in the fetal position, sucking our thumbs and humming.

But horrific things happen. And we tend to read about the best and worst of humanity in books. It's better to read than to experience in most cases.

At some point, we have to stop reading about how Spot the dog's father is looking for him or Elmo's favorite letter being T and we have to read something that will impact us. Change us. Grow us.

Fourteen's the right time for Ender's Game.
I read Ender's Game recently (translated). There were parts of the book where the kids were naked, be it in the showers or in their rooms and there was one of them who had a bouncing penis on his screen or some such.

Other than that, there was no explicit sex anywhere. Ender did do some violent stuff on the game program but violence is not pornography.
avatar
Psyringe: Seriously, if Ender's game is considered pornographic, then we could just as well ban the bible from schools, for containing the Song of Solomon.
Thet reminds me...
Attachments:
Obviously they read the porno version, In Your Ender Game.
a parent complained that the book was pornographic, primarily based on "curse words" in the text.
It would seem she's on the same intellectual level as the woman who couldn't figure out traveling 80 miles per hour means you travel 80 miles in an hour. But this (s)mother isn't the only problem here. The school administration has not only failed to shield the teacher from this baseless, slanderous assault; they have actually exacerbated it.
For once I agree with this guy^

Ender's Game isn't pornographic in the least bit....unless you are a pedophile or something.
avatar
Psyringe: Seriously, if Ender's game is considered pornographic, then we could just as well ban the bible from schools, for containing the Song of Solomon.
avatar
Titanium: Thet reminds me...
:D
Post edited March 23, 2012 by Rohan15
avatar
Tallima: 14 isn't too young to read Ender's Game as a whole (I was 14 when I read it unscathed).
My aunt gave me the Godfather when I was 10. I was perhaps too young to appreciate the finger banging and whatnot but I lived and I don't consider myself scarred as a result. I do remember my teacher was a bit concerned to discover my shoebox diorama project depicted the horse head in bed scene. :P
Hmm, I've never read Ender's Game, but picked up a copy last summer. Maybe after I get through the Foundation series I'll dust it off and give it a whirl.

I mean, cripes, at 15 (just a year older than the student in the article) I cut my teeth on probably fifty or so men's action novels from the 70s and 80s. Spent a whole summer's worth of reading filled with the gruesomely violent escapades of Mack The Executioner Bolan, the wisecracking politically charged humor of Remo The Destroyer Williams, and the sex and gunfire drenched Nick Carter novels. If all that trashy sex and violence didn't harm me, what's a classic sci-fi novel going to do to the average young person?
avatar
Psyringe: Seriously, if Ender's game is considered pornographic, then we could just as well ban the bible from schools, for containing the Song of Solomon.
Well that's not really a good example, just a book I wouldn't like to see in schools anyway :D
Here's my theory about how this happened.
Attachments:
theory.png (66 Kb)