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john_hatcher: It‘s funny how things work (not only for cdpr). If they are promoting a new game, they are all over the place, but answers to somewhat critical questions ... there is no one to be seen.
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kohlrak: Politicians and romantic relationship partners seem to be like that, too. The idea is to let the prospective buyer/voter/investor/boyfriend/girlfriend invent their own dreams about something and then only deliver on precisely what they say, but never on the imagination that they promote. If you call them out later, they say "I didn't actually promise that," but they totally lead you on the whole way. Honestly, it's our fault for falling for it, but it's really important to point out and catch.
I absolutely agree with you. That is why, at least with games, I only buy them when they deliver what I want and never preorder a game because of them bonus or things like that. If tthey want my monney, they first have to deliver.
With politics it‘s different, but I don‘t forget so easy like some others and never vote for some party that lied to me.
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kohlrak: Politicians and romantic relationship partners seem to be like that, too. The idea is to let the prospective buyer/voter/investor/boyfriend/girlfriend invent their own dreams about something and then only deliver on precisely what they say, but never on the imagination that they promote. If you call them out later, they say "I didn't actually promise that," but they totally lead you on the whole way. Honestly, it's our fault for falling for it, but it's really important to point out and catch.
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john_hatcher: I absolutely agree with you. That is why, at least with games, I only buy them when they deliver what I want and never preorder a game because of them bonus or things like that. If tthey want my monney, they first have to deliver.
With politics it‘s different, but I don‘t forget so easy like some others and never vote for some party that lied to me.
You must not vote anymore, then.
GO LINUX. Forget MicroSoft.
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Gede: The bottom line is that they believe that the money they would make with Linux (and Mac) sales will not make it worth the investment on that title.
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shmerl: Nothing stops them from crowdfunding such effort, if money is the issue. I assume it's not about the money really.
This really ignores several core issues

Profitability and opportunity cost

Its all about money. Games crowdfund because game development costs are front loaded. You have high up front costs. You are basically time-shifting revenue from the future to today. But games still have to MAKE MONEY. They're not a charity and CDPR as a publicly traded company is interested in profit

So crowdfunding doesn't solve the issue of profitability. You still are going to put X money in, and are getting Y money out. crowdfunding just defers a percentage of Y to the present. But the bucket of sales is still Y overall, and profitability is viewed from that perspective. If the linux port is unprofitable, then its not worth doing.

Then there is Opportunity Cost. A dev studio has finite resources. So resource allocation is zero-sum. Resources put into A do not get put into B. So not only is there an actual dollar cost of X for putting a bunch of engineers on this Linux project for 1 year. But there's the opportunity cost of "if I put X engineers on Witcher 3 Linux, that's X engineers that are NOT working on Cyperbunk 2077". That opportunity cost could be "we cannot implement feature A without those engineers" or "we must delay teh game because we don't have enough engineers".

So now you say "well just outsource the porting" ok so now you've increased the cost by A LOT so your profitably goes down. Also outsourcing doesn't mean 'you don't need to manage the project'. In fact to do so requires a lot of dedicated resources, time, energy from your core team. porting is not a 'fire and forget' thing. Thus again you are sucking away resources from other projects to the port. Is that worth it.

In this situation your profitability question is not just "Are we making money X" but also "is making X money even worth it compared to the lost resources to other more profitable projects". As a core example I'd like to point out Stardock's Elemental Game vs Impulse Store dilemma. Elemental was a disaster mostly because of Impulse. Impulse store was highly profitable and thus the company re-allocated limited resources to the thing that was making money. The question of "where do I put engineer X" is easy when you see Impulse is making boat lods of money but not Elemental so the opportunity costs of engeineer x is better spent on impulse than Elemental.

Thus the question is not just "we wil make $100k on Witcher 3 Linux" is also "was that worth it because we probably could have made $1 million on Cyperbunk 2077 with those engineers". Thus even making money can be considered a LOSS with regards to resource utilization.
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satoru: So crowdfunding doesn't solve the issue of profitability.
Profitability isn't a problem, Linux releases are profitable that was already mentioned above. The problem is either uncertainty of sufficient demand, or lack of current funds. Crowdfunding helps with both.

This excuse of "should we use money for other projects" is irrelevant, since they in the past already promised TW3 release for Linux. Besides, according to CDPR themselves they wanted to release for Linux even in the time when Linux gaming market was smaller than today. So all these pesudo financial reasons are really missing the point here. Don't apply some generic exec logic to this particular case.
Post edited August 06, 2018 by shmerl