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tinyE: What is it with threes?
Postal 3 sucked.
Carmageddon 3 sucked.
Commandos 3 sucked.
X-Men 3 sucked.
Jaws 3 sucked.
Star Trek 3 sucked.
Spider-Man 3 sucked.
Superman 3 sucked.
Led Zeppelin 3 was good but by far the weaker of 1-4.
But Megaman Zero 3 was the best
Duke Nukem 3D was the 3rd and most popular of the series.
And let's not even talk about Half-Life 3
Post edited March 14, 2015 by Barefoot_Monkey
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Sanjuro: Quite serious. The third GTA game wasn't worse than the previous ones, received a lot of positive reviews from the critics, sold well and attracted a lot of new fans to the series (same wiki article, "Legacy" section) so, while I can't count myself among the fans of this game or the series on the whole, it doesn't change the fact that the game belongs in this list.
OK, I read your previous posts and I thought you were saying that GTA 3 was bad (hence why I asked if you were joking/serious). Carry on, then.
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Shendue: Actually, i did like Bioshock Infinite the best, in the trilogy. I think the first episode, thought atmospheric, lacks variety in terms of gameplay, and the second one is great in terms of gameplay and i really liked the story but it lacked in originality being basically "more of the same".
The third one is much brighter in atmosphere and less horrific (until the last part of the game, at least), which may have annoyed some people (personally i didn't mind it, it made the game fresh and different) but the gameplay is top notch and the narrative elements are pretty solid.

Deus EX HR is great and a fitting sequel to the original Deus Ex, after the mediocre Invisible War, but it lacks the sense of freedom and the immersivity of the first game, that feeling of actually being in a larger world and being able to change the outcome of the story with your own action. It feels like it has a smaller scope in comparison.
It does some things better, indeed. The enemy AI in the first game was especially flawed IMHO, for example. But overall the first game had a more "timeless classic" feel while playing it.

GTA 3 wasn't bad at all for its time. It was actually an exquisite transition to the 3 dimensions of the GTA formula, with amazing inprovements that were the foundation of what GTA is nowadays. The fact that the sequels are much better doesn't mean it was bad, it just means it was surpassed and it's now outdated. Maybe you have that feeling because you played it AFTER playing Vice City?

P.S. I think all the 3 Hobbit movies are pretty average, so that's more like a case of "Star Wars Episode X prequel syndrome".
"!=" - "does not equal to" so yeah, I actually meant that those games/films are decent at the very least when compared to the previous installment(s).
With Deus Ex you have a point, though I suspect we look at the games from different perspectives. I pay more attention to the story, how logical it is, how well-developed the game world and the characters are etc.
JC is an agent who was made exactly for what he does and he accepts it (in one of the endings he even utters "This is what I was made for, isn't it? This is why I exist? All right. Let's do this."), while Adam "never asked for this", he received all the implants not because he chose to or was meant to. Different stories, different paths. In terms of personality I'd say Jensen is more shaped-out, JC was more... detached, I think. With Adam we saw glimpses of his past life in side quests, in his conversations with other people, even the flat he lived in told us something about him (the broken looking-glass, Kubrick's photo). Denton, however, felt like a man out of nowhere, with little to no past. How did he become an agent, who was he before that, has he always lived with his brother in that hotel? Eventually you get some answers, but still JC felt almost... inhuman? (and I'm not talking of face animations here)
Post edited March 14, 2015 by Sanjuro
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Sanjuro: "!=" - "does not equal to" so yeah, I actually meant that those games/films are decent at the very least when compared to the previous installment(s).
With Deus Ex you have a point, though I suspect we look at the games from different perspectives. I pay more attention to the story, how logical it is, how well-developed the game world and the characters are etc.
JC is an agent who was made exactly for what he does and he accepts it (in one of the endings he even utters "This is what I was made for, isn't it? This is why I exist? All right. Let's do this."), while Adam "never asked for this", he received all the implants not because he chose to or was meant to. Different stories, different paths. In terms of personality I'd say Jensen is more shaped-out, JC was more... detached, I think. With Adam we saw glimpses of his past life in side quests, in his conversations with other people, even the flat he lived in told us something about him (the broken looking-glass, Kubrick's photo). Denton, however, felt like a man out of nowhere, with little to no past. How did he become an agent, who was he before that, has he always lived with his brother in that hotel? Eventually you get some answers, but still JC felt almost... inhuman? (and I'm not talking of face animations here)
If you look at my message, i had already edited it, i did realize you wrote "!=" and not "=" right after posting the comment and corrected it immediately, even expanding my thoughts on Bioshock, but you ninja'ed me.
About JC, i absolutely love silent badasses. I enjoy realistic characters, but i enjoy even more the cold badass archetype. I also think a more generic character helps the immersivity better. Usually, complex characters work better in linear stories (think The Last of Us, for example), while open-ended, sandbox-ey games with a strong accent on immersivity benefit from a character that is more like a white canvas, since it allows the player to fit better in his shoes and basically roleplay him.
Post edited March 15, 2015 by Shendue