It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer or Opera

×
avatar
Katanamochi: I think cyberpunk will bring a whole lot more interest towards Gog, if it turns out as expected (pre ordered i cannot wait), gog could get a lot bigger as ppl find out more about cyberpunk and pay gog more attention especially if gog 2 works as expected, that means it could become a default hub linking library’s and as such the more ppl may use it (i am) that way they are more likely to look at the gog store first. this could be good especially now cd project red told fem freq where to go, and said they back the gamers and won’t allow epic to steal their games gog is still saying the things many want to hear unlike steam and epic.
avatar
paladin181: Witcher brought exponential growth to GOG. Cyberpunk likely will too. But GOG will not be ready again and will push a good 30% back out the door with half-assed website and such, much like last time.
your probably right but i do hope this time Gog uses cyberpunk success to its fullest, time will tell after all cyberpunk sure won’t be another anthem disaster. as they have already made pro gamer choices. like telling Anita Sarkisian where to go which was a very satisfying moment to behold.

I know i am just starting to get into this community so i dont have the knowledge you guys have yet.
Post edited July 04, 2019 by Katanamochi
avatar
AB2012: Clearly not "familiar with every single moderator" enough:-
https://steamcommunity.com/app/262060/discussions/0/3247562523089319657/?ctp=8#c1796278072844476594
So that $@^# is Valve's shill?
Thank you for sharing this information.
Post edited July 05, 2019 by Fate-is-one-edge
Well it is gratifying.to know that I am not alone in terms of a pathological aversion to Steam.

Steam is in a much stronger financial position than GOG, yet I cannot bring myself to trust them to be around for the long term.

Perhaps it is because I am more of a loner and restrict myself to single player games. 20-30 year old games, where the developer is dead are still viable. Not everything will still run, but I have generally had good luck in coaxing it to work.


If it isn't DRM that is keeping me from spending money on Steam, perhaps I consider Valve to be less ethical. Loot boxes, skin gambling, pay to win account levelling/sale metagames, charging money for asset-flip rubbish...

Either way, I view Steam as having made poor choices that prevent me from supporting them.
avatar
StingingVelvet: Consumers have always cared more about convenience and price than anything else. Also they love social media features. So it's no wonder Steam and the like took off, they hit all three buttons like a monkey in an Apollo rocket.
avatar
Katanamochi: good analogy, but in a way it was a good model that came at the right time, pc gaming was dying the consoles seemed to have won, then that fateful bunch of old pc school gamers stayed around as steam come in gathered up a host of titles put them out for cheap unlike gog they added social media capabilities, then one person looked and told his friends’ and soon the gaming pc rose like a phoenix on steroids despite gog being the one company that tried to keep the pc market alive originally, now we are at a cross roads again.

sjw attacks/sjw influence on games, censorship, attacks on free speech, saturation with low tire games, triple A insult//milking their gamers, untrustworthy bad players like google trying to muscle its way into this market.

then epic doing very shady things such as scooping up games and crowd funded games that rode on steams backbone, and then throwing money at crowd funded titles and then telling the very ppl that backed them to f off, the game wouldn’t exist without them. I am a crowd funder and i backed a couple games, due to this i will never back another.

Depending what happens next year pc and now Nintendo could bury the console market with Sony soy station going full woke and full censorship, now the x box doing the exact same thing it could finally end Xbox and Sony’s grip.

I think cyberpunk will bring a whole lot more interest towards Gog, if it turns out as expected (pre ordered i cannot wait), gog could get a lot bigger as ppl find out more about cyberpunk and pay gog more attention especially if gog 2 works as expected, that means it could become a default hub linking library’s and as such the more ppl may use it (i am) that way they are more likely to look at the gog store first. this could be good especially now cd project red told fem freq where to go, and said they back the gamers and won’t allow epic to steal their games gog is still saying the things many want to hear unlike steam and epic.
It'll bring temp interest, there are still too many failures to explain what exactly DRM is or what exactly GoG does. They reliance on mainstream media to portray the service is only ever a temp fix. Going directly to the consumer and surrounding bodies would be far better, probably cheaper too.

As Aesop said 'been ignored for longer than you’ve been interested' feels pretty relevant.
low rated
DRM is here to stay. Simple.



I once had someone say in a forum they bought a game on GoG and if they wanted it, just ask, 'cause it's DRM Free.. they took it to mean they could share that game with anyone they wanted too. I pointed out what DRM is and what DRM free actually meant, the only one in an entire forum full of gamers, yeah that post went silent.


At the end of the day, there are too many uneducated* (lol) people.





*Thats putting it fucking lightly.
avatar
Katanamochi: your shouting at a brick wall cloud based client distribution gives devs and companies a powerful tool to save money at the detriment of the customer it gives them the illusion of value for money, that's why gog is good they offer both client based distribution of a single installer download.
avatar
StingingVelvet: Consumers have always cared more about convenience and price than anything else. Also they love social media features. So it's no wonder Steam and the like took off, they hit all three buttons like a monkey in an Apollo rocket.
SOME consumers have always cared more about convenience. Some are price-conscious (by choice or otherwise), and some think differently.

I was amongst the first to but Half-Life 2 (I still have my original box and discs), and I had no problem with Steam and the Valve client to install the game (even if it did take two hours on the day of release to log into the damn server to authenticate the files I had just installed from the disc in order to play the game).

I certainly DO have a problem installing the Valve client to authenticate my games before I can play them. (λ² could be played off-line once it was installed, since always-connected computing was a dream back then.)
low rated
avatar
Linko64: It'll bring temp interest, there are still too many failures to explain what exactly DRM is or what exactly GoG does. They reliance on mainstream media to portray the service is only ever a temp fix. Going directly to the consumer and surrounding bodies would be far better, probably cheaper too.

As Aesop said 'been ignored for longer than you’ve been interested' feels pretty relevant.
All of the headaches related to social media hysteria are largely the result of failing to take that to heart.
Post edited July 06, 2019 by richlind33
avatar
scientiae: I was amongst the first to but Half-Life 2 (I still have my original box and discs), and I had no problem with Steam and the Valve client to install the game (even if it did take two hours on the day of release to log into the damn server to authenticate the files I had just installed from the disc in order to play the game).

I certainly DO have a problem installing the Valve client to authenticate my games before I can play them. (λ² could be played off-line once it was installed, since always-connected computing was a dream back then.)
Not sure what you mean here. My memory is that Half-Life 2 absolutely required internet authorization to install but could then be played offline, just like every basic Steamworks title today. They've extended how long offline mode works, but that's about the only change to Steam DRM for the consumer experience since the beginning, as far as I know. Right or wrong, the vast, vast majority of consumers don't have a problem with it.
avatar
scientiae:
avatar
StingingVelvet: Not sure what you mean here. My memory is that Half-Life 2 absolutely required internet authorization to install but could then be played offline, just like every basic Steamworks title today. They've extended how long offline mode works, but that's about the only change to Steam DRM for the consumer experience since the beginning, as far as I know. Right or wrong, the vast, vast majority of consumers don't have a problem with it.
I meant that I am happy to jump hoops for the IP owner (Valve required Steam client to authenticate before executing: classic DRM) but that I am less inclined to acquiesce my autonomy to Steam for EVERY game.

I actually play my games on a different (i.e., not-connected) computer to that which I download them, so Steam is a deal-breaker. Without Gog I cannot be sure that I wold ever buy another game (that hasn't already been released without DRM).

(My actual point was that —— even if I am one of a very few —— there are some customers for whom convenience and price are less important. :)
avatar
StingingVelvet: Not sure what you mean here. My memory is that Half-Life 2 absolutely required internet authorization to install but could then be played offline, just like every basic Steamworks title today. They've extended how long offline mode works, but that's about the only change to Steam DRM for the consumer experience since the beginning, as far as I know. Right or wrong, the vast, vast majority of consumers don't have a problem with it.
avatar
scientiae: I meant that I am happy to jump hoops for the IP owner (Valve required Steam client to authenticate before executing: classic DRM) but that I am less inclined to acquiesce my autonomy to Steam for EVERY game.

I actually play my games on a different (i.e., not-connected) computer to that which I download them, so Steam is a deal-breaker. Without Gog I cannot be sure that I wold ever buy another game (that hasn't already been released without DRM).

(My actual point was that —— even if I am one of a very few —— there are some customers for whom convenience and price are less important. :)
i get your point you rather avoid steam if you can and that i do agree with, including epic, origin, battllenet, bathesada, Uplay and the partridge in a pear tree, i agree none of these launchers are trustworthy for multiple reasons ranging from bad code to questionable activities by them, while some Gog games need authorising that is something i do accept as this is Gog, but many don’t you dl the setup and install.

it is nice to have that choice.

Cyberpunk is unusual for me to pre order, i normally wait until say 6 months so bugs are fixed, and ppl are happy with it, but i have more faith in cd projek red, than most other companies out there.

so, cyberpunk don’t let me down.
avatar
rjbuffchix: Google Stadia (and equivalent streaming) are what stands to be worse/as bad as Steam in terms of effects on the gaming market. Steam's virtual monopoly did its best to kill ownership of games, with online connections to the client as well as other DRM. Even retail "physical" PC games were just boxes with Steam keys to get more people on there perpetuating the cycle (reminds me of putting Galaxy into the installers, coughcough). The only thing that for the next decade could have a similar effect as Steam did in the last decade, would be streaming. Epic is another junk store with big pockets...I'd view them as more similar to something like EA Origin if anything.
Not even close in terms of how bad this is going to be. With Steam/even the worst DRM you still have access to the physical data, which means in theory archival/reverse engineering the DRM is possible.

With "services" like Stadia, not only are you at the mercy of both the platform provider as well as your ISP (in before monthly "gaming" packages so they don't throttle your connection to Stadia, etc.) but there is zero access to the game code or any of your data. Couldn't get any worse for privacy, couldn't get any worse for the concept of ownership, kills archival and modding outright.

We can only hope that the inevitable technical disaster will stop it from taking over, despite how desensitised people are to this awful trend away from ownership to "service" economies.
avatar
scientiae: I meant that I am happy to jump hoops for the IP owner (Valve required Steam client to authenticate before executing: classic DRM) but that I am less inclined to acquiesce my autonomy to Steam for EVERY game.

I actually play my games on a different (i.e., not-connected) computer to that which I download them, so Steam is a deal-breaker. Without Gog I cannot be sure that I wold ever buy another game (that hasn't already been released without DRM).

(My actual point was that —— even if I am one of a very few —— there are some customers for whom convenience and price are less important. :)
If Valve didn't offer a DRM that most consumers accepted then companies would use something else anyway. A lot of them use Denuvo or other things now anyway, because Steam's DRM isn't that effective. It's not like without Steam everything would be DRM free, things would likely be even worse. I think a lot of people miss that truth, no offense at all intended.
avatar
scientiae:
avatar
StingingVelvet: If Valve didn't offer a DRM that most consumers accepted then companies would use something else anyway. A lot of them use Denuvo or other things now anyway, because Steam's DRM isn't that effective. It's not like without Steam everything would be DRM free, things would likely be even worse. I think a lot of people miss that truth, no offense at all intended.
Well, then it depends on what the "something else" is, surely?

As long as I can play the game without a connection, I don't mind the rights being enforced. As long as I control the software (where I install it, how I run it, etc.), then it has no impact on me. I don't object to rights-holders enforcing their rights, I object to my rights to play a game I have purchased being abrogated to the point where I can no longer play it. (The problem usually occurs when the copy protection is over-protective, meaning it checks during gameplay, e.g., disc access was always fraught with a game like Space Rangers.)

Another concern, especially now, is that computers aren't sold with optical drives anymore. So a game like Rome — Total War is now impossible to play, since it requires the play disc to be installed whilst the game is operating, and it isn't sold here.

I assume it's possible to connect a Blu-ray/DVD player via USB and use that as a bootable drive for the play disc, but I have yet to test it …. assuming a BiOS update to include the external optical drive will be all that is necessary. If not, then I now have no access to all the old games I have on optical storage, except for those Gog have in the catalogue (like Dragon Age).
avatar
scientiae: I was amongst the first to but Half-Life 2 (I still have my original box and discs), and I had no problem with Steam and the Valve client to install the game (even if it did take two hours on the day of release to log into the damn server to authenticate the files I had just installed from the disc in order to play the game).

I certainly DO have a problem installing the Valve client to authenticate my games before I can play them. (λ² could be played off-line once it was installed, since always-connected computing was a dream back then.)
avatar
StingingVelvet: Not sure what you mean here. My memory is that Half-Life 2 absolutely required internet authorization to install but could then be played offline, just like every basic Steamworks title today. They've extended how long offline mode works, but that's about the only change to Steam DRM for the consumer experience since the beginning, as far as I know. Right or wrong, the vast, vast majority of consumers don't have a problem with it.
yeah and this is the big issue cos these people have no problem with things in this industry it lets these companys run rampant, remember the first micro transactions for games people ignored them and thought, bah its only a fad now look at the games industry,every fucking game has microtransactions now
And most annoying is when people complain about the trends in gaming (DRM, micro-transactions, chopping up games into lots of DLC, unfinished releases, ... take your pick) and still support those very trends with their money. It doesn't matter how big the outcry about something in the Steam forum is, as long as the money keeps flowing.

Apparently many, many people can't grasp the very simple concept: if you don't like it, don't buy it. Instead they buy and complain and buy and complain in an endless cycle that makes Steam, Epic & co. rich.