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I have just bought three games that I plan to share with a friend. Since all games are drm-free, I'm assuming I can simply put them on a memory stick and he can then install them on his own computer. Am I wrong? If so, then what do I do to share them? Thanks for any replies.
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Learn the difference between "can" and "should".
Post edited January 13, 2017 by VeTrack
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Fran67: I have just bought three games that I plan to share with a friend. Since all games are drm-free, I'm assuming I can simply put them on a memory stick and he can then install them on his own computer. Am I wrong?
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VeTrack: You are right. Download the installers, move them anywhere you want and anybody can install from them anytime.
NO NO NO NO NO

Yes technically you can do that but it is still considered piracy and costs GOG countless dollars as well as keeping distributors from offering their good here.

Another computer or your laptop fine, but you don't put them on a stick and start giving them out to friends.
Post edited January 11, 2017 by tinyE
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Talk about herd behavior...
Post edited January 13, 2017 by VeTrack
Well, this friend is also my son. No, I wouldn't simply give out games like that and he lives with me in the same house.
2. Can I re-download my purchased items? Is there a limit to the number of re-downloads?
You can always re-download items bought at GOG.com via the “My account” page. Also, there is no limit to the number of redownloads, but please remember that you're not allowed to share your GOG.com account with other users as only you are entitled to download items from your account.

https://www.gog.com/support/website_help/downloads_and_games
If it is your son:
9. Can I enjoy my purchases both on my laptop and desktop computer at home?
Yes. We do not limit the number of installations or reinstallations, as long as you install your purchased games on computers in your household. So yeah, if you've got a render-farm in the basement, you might actually break the world record for the number of legal Witcher installations in one household. However, if you think about installing your game on a friend's machine or sharing it with others then please don't do it, okay?
The same principle applies to movies - you're free to watch them anywhere you want, with anyone you want, as long as you don't share them with people who haven't purchased them.
Jeeze, all my dad ever shared with me are his stories bout how he had to walk five miles in the snow to school every day.

Uphill.

Both ways.
He has his own gog account. I have mine. We have different computers that we don't share. There must be SOME way around this problem, at least I HOPE so.
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Fran67: He has his own gog account. I have mine. We have different computers that we don't share. There must be SOME way around this problem, at least I HOPE so.
Couldn't you just give him your login details, then have him log in under your account and download the games from there?
Uh, I don't think that would be a good idea. It might work, but I wouldn't want to try it. Man, I really screwed myself up this time!
If your son lives in your household, I'd say you can follow hummer010's advice and simply install it on another device in your household. Put the installer on a thumbdrive or download it there.

If not, or if your son is already of legal age, it might be impossible from a legal point of view.
GOG's account and game licenses are for personal use only (see user agreements). As long as your son isn't contractually capable, there shouldn't be much of a problem with using your license, since you've parental authority, but once he is (and he partially ought to be when he's got his own GOG account) you can only refer to living in the same household, but that's already a grey area.

If he's adult and lives elsewhere it would be simply software piracy because he doesn't have a license to install the game on his machine.
Post edited January 12, 2017 by DeMignon
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Fran67: Uh, I don't think that would be a good idea. It might work, but I wouldn't want to try it. Man, I really screwed myself up this time!
I take it your son doesn't live with you?
If you've just purchased them, and haven't downloaded them, and want to give them to your son, contact support and have them converted to gift codes that you can give to you son to redeem on his own account.

If your son lives in your house, you can refer to point #9 that I quoted above.
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DeMignon: If your son lives in your household, I'd say you can follow hummer010's advice and simply install it on another device in your household. Put the installer on a thumbdrive or download it there.

If not, or if your son is already of legal age, it might be impossible from a legal point of view.
GOG's account and game licenses are for personal use only (see user agreements). As long as your son isn't contractually capable, there shouldn't be much of a problem with using your license, since you've parental authority, but once he is (and he partially ought to be when he's got his own GOG account) you can only refer to living in the same household, but that's already a grey area.

If he's adult and lives elsewhere it would be simply software piracy because he doesn't have a license to install the game on his machine.
The best advice I've seen regarding how to obey the spirit of the rules without necessarily following them to the letter is this: treat a DRM-free game like a physical book. That is, if you want to lend it to someone else, make sure you have uninstalled it from your own computer(s) first, and make sure you trust the recipient to not keep a copy when they're done with it (or distribute it to anyone else).
EDIT: Clarified wording
Post edited January 12, 2017 by HunchBluntley