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A legendary comeback to take earth back.



<span class="bold">X-COM Classic Bundle</span>, a pack containing five games that set the bar for both tactical and chaotic extraterrestrial warfare, is now available DRM-free on GOG.com with a 75% launch discount. Scavenging the bundle for individual parts grants you a 50% discount on each one.

Is there any gamer left on the planet still unfamiliar with the X-COM legacy? Sure, the organization that was put together when the alien threat reared its ugly head was a project largely kept secret for global security reasons, but the games chronicling its exploits made quite a splash. And for good reason.

When alien invaders do come knocking at Earth's door again, this is what every stalwart protector should have studied in order to prepare themselves for any possible scenario. It's all in here: The tactical, close-combat encounters with alien intruders coming from the far-away corners of space, forcing X-COM to build a <span class="bold">UFO Defense</span>. The extensive research on alien technology that helped scientists understand how to fight back the <span class="bold">Terror from the Deep</span> that emerged from our unexplored oceans. The deep-space fighting against the advancing alien forces that called for a highly-skilled <span class="bold">Interceptor</span>. The desperate fight of a single scientist using scavenged alien technology to clear the streets from aliens as a brutal <span class="bold">Enforcer</span>. But did we ever manage to fully cancel the <span class="bold">Apocalypse</span> and secure our little corner in the galaxy? That is yet to be determined, commander.



Fight the alien forces across five games that (re)defined entire genres in the <span class="bold">X-COM Classic Bundle</span>, DRM-free on GOG.com. The 75% bundle discount and the 50% individual discounts will last until April 5, 13:59 BST / 5:59 AM PDT / 8:59 AM EDT.
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Woolytoes: X-Com UFO Defense, Terror from the Deep and Apocalypse are DOS Games, but not the other two. Enforcer & Interceptor would need Wine, but they are running pretty good.
Thanks for the info! So it doesn't look too bad for playing them on Linux, even without official support. At the bundle price with 75% discount it's probably worth to risk it. :)
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samok79: Questions:

What versions are UFO Defense and Terror from the Deep?
Like... DOS(box)/ Windows? Floppy or CD?

I don't see this info on the store page nor in this thread.
Thanks in advance.
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korell: They are DOSBox games. Also, at 19MB and 48MB installers, I'd hope they are CD versions of the games rather than floppy disc versions but I haven't checked. I think I'll be running them via OpenXcom anyway, so I'll just be extracting the data files from the installers.
I checked TFTD yesterday and it's DOS version that runs on DOSBox but it also seems it's CD version with pre-rendered intro.
On a side note I saw this intro for the first time in my life - years ago I only played fdd version with static pictures ;-D
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tburger: I checked TFTD yesterday and it's DOS version that runs on DOSBox but it also seems it's CD version with pre-rendered intro.
On a side note I saw this intro for the first time in my life - years ago I only played fdd version with static pictures ;-D
Interestingly enough, I found that TFTD seems to have another executable file, with an icon too (a Windows executable maybe?). All I did was extract the files with Innounp, though, I didn't carry out an actual installation, as my intention was only to get the data files for use with OpenXcom.
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tburger: I checked TFTD yesterday and it's DOS version that runs on DOSBox but it also seems it's CD version with pre-rendered intro.
On a side note I saw this intro for the first time in my life - years ago I only played fdd version with static pictures ;-D
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korell: Interestingly enough, I found that TFTD seems to have another executable file, with an icon too (a Windows executable maybe?). All I did was extract the files with Innounp, though, I didn't carry out an actual installation, as my intention was only to get the data files for use with OpenXcom.
Maybe the CD version of TFTD ran in Windows enviroment and GOG reworked it to run in DOSBox for better compatibility?
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tburger: Maybe the CD version of TFTD ran in Windows enviroment and GOG reworked it to run in DOSBox for better compatibility?
CD versions of both UFO Defense and TFTD had both Windows and DOS versions, as did quite a few games released in the 1995-1997 period. Getting the Windows version to work on a modern Windows OS is a bit of a pain though.
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JMich: CD versions of both UFO Defense and TFTD had both Windows and DOS versions, as did quite a few games released in the 1995-1997 period. Getting the Windows version to work on a modern Windows OS is a bit of a pain though.
That's probably it, then, as I do remember reading that the CD intro video could be used with the floppy version by replacing the relevant files. The Windows executable is probably then left over as a remnant and not used by the GOG installation.

Both UFO and TFTD seem to work well with OpenXcom, though, should anyone not want to use DOSBox. You need the nightly build to play TFTD, though, as v1.0 only supports UFO.
Post edited April 01, 2016 by korell
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tburger: Maybe the CD version of TFTD ran in Windows enviroment and GOG reworked it to run in DOSBox for better compatibility?
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JMich: CD versions of both UFO Defense and TFTD had both Windows and DOS versions, as did quite a few games released in the 1995-1997 period.
Was there any significant difference between fdd and cd version of UFO 1?
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JMich: CD versions of both UFO Defense and TFTD had both Windows and DOS versions, as did quite a few games released in the 1995-1997 period.
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tburger: Was there any significant difference between fdd and cd version of UFO 1?
The copy protection screens (entering codes) were removed, and some changes to the sounds were made (alien death sounds, possibly music). I think the intro video might have changed, too, or was that just for Terror From The Deep (which was a slideshow on floppy disc and video on CD)?
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tburger: Was there any significant difference between fdd and cd version of UFO 1?
Not really. Biggest change I'd say was the merging of GEOSCAPE.EXE and TACTICAL.EXE, so you could no longer crash the tactical part to get the last mission's rewards. Maybe the victory screen was changed to video instead of still images, but not sure if this was the case or not. Too long since I've last completed the game, so no idea what the outro video looked like in the two (or 5) versions.
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korell:
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tburger: I checked TFTD yesterday and it's DOS version that runs on DOSBox but it also seems it's CD version with pre-rendered intro.
On a side note I saw this intro for the first time in my life - years ago I only played fdd version with static pictures ;-D
I have this intro burned so badly in my brain that it never goes away whenever I think about it... oh shit!
Post edited April 02, 2016 by Andremop
I'm interested in how many people think TFtD is better than EU? And I wonder how many out of those played TftD first? I personally can't stand TFtD, the soldiers when you equip them look like someone took an eraser to their faces.
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wyrenn: I'm interested in how many people think TFtD is better than EU? And I wonder how many out of those played TftD first? I personally can't stand TFtD, the soldiers when you equip them look like someone took an eraser to their faces.
I played UFO Defense (aka Enemy Unknown) first, then Terror From The Deep. I preferred UFO, but still enjoyed TFTD. TFTD was a little bit more than just a reskin, but I also found it harder. Whilst I finished UFO I ended up stuck on TFTD at the point where I was attacking the enemy bases. Guess my research hadn't progressed as fast as I needed it to.

Apocalypse I never really got into. Played a few tactical rounds, but something wasn't quite right somewhere. I think it was because I tried playing it with the realtime mode, which I've since read is best to leave alone. I'll have to give it another try at some point, especially now that I have the full bundle here on GOG.

Interceptor got boring fast due to the sheer repetitiveness of everything, so with that game I cheated in order to skip to the story missions and just played through the plot itself.

And lastly I played Enforcer. Well, I played about a third of it anyway.

UFO is by far my favourite of them, and then TFTD.
Post edited April 02, 2016 by korell
I'm a blank slate on the XCOM series, that and I don't play many strategy games (besides Ground Control II which I played ages ago so I don't particularly remember anything). What's a good starting point in the XCOM releases? It should be one that'll let me play in short bursts.
Check out Macnimina's All Your History about the history of the X-Com franchise.

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYkZ9mwEsuQ

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KayLDcriHg

Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_msUpNpKM4

Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbaDQ55jBVE
Post edited April 02, 2016 by DustFalcon1985
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PookaMustard: I'm a blank slate on the XCOM series, that and I don't play many strategy games (besides Ground Control II which I played ages ago so I don't particularly remember anything). What's a good starting point in the XCOM releases? It should be one that'll let me play in short bursts.
The first three are all hard and unforgiving turn-based games, and battles can take a long time. Then you have the two spin offs which are not strategy games at all. Enforcer is a third person shooter and Interceptor is a space flight combat sim. So those will not give you any idea about what the actual X-Com experience is. Which is death, pain, and misery mixed in with some laughter and tears.

Go with the first, see what you think. If you hate it, don't even bother with the others.