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To arms, my noble Saxon knights!

Defender of the Crown, a 1986 turn-based strategy classic, originally launched on the Commodore Amiga, is available in all it's pixelated glory on GOG.com, for $5.99!

We are happy to announce a new partnership with Cinemaware that will bring plenty of mouth-watering classics in their best available incarnations. Starting with Defender of the Crown, more classic titles from Cinemaware will release on GOG.com with both PC and emulated Commodore Amiga versions. Yes, the graphically superior, awesome, beautiful and shiny Amiga versions!

Today's release is a wonderful gem straight from the 80s. Back in the day, Defender of the Crown set a new standard for graphical presentation and innovative, fresh gameplay. As the leader of an initially sparse pack of Saxon knights, building up your army and influence as you proceed, you'll have to stick it to the Normans in an effort to gain control of the war-torn medieval England. Your strategic prowess as well as your sword fighting skills will be severely tested. This turn-based strategy classic will have you saving damsels in distress with your blade, jousting with fearsome knights, and besieging Norman castles - all the while reveling in the Amiga quality sound and beautiful graphics.

Defeat those pesky Normans and unite England in Defender of the Crown, for $5.99 on GOG.com.
Post edited September 09, 2014 by JudasIscariot
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damien: does this mean more Amiga titles in the future? Or is this a one time Cinemaware deal?
Just for Cinemaware, guys :)
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damien: does this mean more Amiga titles in the future? Or is this a one time Cinemaware deal?
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Fever_Discordia: I would image there's more CINEMAWARE Amiga titles to come - not sure if that's a yes or a no...

How are they going it then? some kind of BIOS less emulation? Was it because Cinemaware used loaders that pretty much negated the Amiga's BIOS in the first place or something?
They have their own custom emulator called RockLobster ...inspired by the B52's :D
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HiPhish: No Mac version? I guess that's because of the emulator used. At least with DOS games I could just take the files and dump them into Boxer or der Mac version of DOSBox.
We're hoping to have a Mac version out for everyone soon but no ETA as of right now :)
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karnak1: THANK YOU, GOG!

Now, if some time later, we manage to get Playstation, Genesis, SNES (and other platforms) classics here on GOG, I strongly support this new idea of yours.

I confess that, some years ago, I was against the idea of selling emulated games here. I've now changed my mind. Old computer and console classics have the right to be brought from oblivion and restored so that all may learn and play with the past.

Thumbs up!
Well, this is a special case for Cinemaware as they did the legal and programming legwork to get the Amiga versions running :) So let's not get all too excited alright? :)
Post edited September 09, 2014 by JudasIscariot
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JudasIscariot: Well, this is a special case for Cinemaware as they did the legal and programming legwork to get the Amiga versions running :) So let's not get all too excited alright? :)
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keeveek: I know I am going to be minused to hell but let me put this this way

so BarryWoodward contacted Cinemaware and pretty much arranged the grounds for both parties to meet agreement

and Cinemaware themselves did half the work to make those games work on PCs.

The question is

Are you fucking kidding me?
I don't understand what you are so mad about?
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JudasIscariot: I don't understand what you are so mad about?
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keeveek: I just wonder if you even care about classic games anymore or you just release them only if others do the work for you....
We do care about them but

a)

We don't have the time or the resources to make our own emulation software a la RockLobster.

b) If you're wondering why we haven't, for example, we haven't gone into making Amiga games compatible in geberal, then it's most likely because of licensing issues that outweigh any benefit we'd get from that kind of venture.

Besides, we are working on the classics on our own, Hogs of War being the most recent example, but they take time to get done right. If you want us to just throw loose files out there without a care as to whether they work or any support, then we don't swing that way.
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timppu: So what has GOG pretended to be? Did they say somewhere they'll do anything to get any old game to GOG?

I don't know, maybe there isn't that much money to be made with the classics alone anymore for one store, especially as they are appearing also on Origin, Steam etc.?
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keeveek: That's ok.

I remember TET saying not so long ago they will do (not anything, but whatever they can) to bring at least one classic game a week to GOG and that they would never abandon classic games.

If GOG doesn't give a damn, that's ok too.

I am surprised you're the first one to jump with defense and joy that GOG is becoming more and more like Steam.
And we have been bringing a classic every week, sometimes more than one, if possible :)
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TheJadedOne: (Off topic, but I don't know WTF GOG is thinking. What the hell does GOG think new users are going to do when they go to gog.com and see a front page that looks like the attached?)

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IronArcturus: Wow, I had no idea the Amiga had a much better sound chip than the DOS PC's.
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TheJadedOne: LOL. That's so cute. You think DOS PC's had a sound chip. :-P

I'm sure you've heard of "retro" 8-bit sound. Standard DOS PC's (sans sound card) had 1-bit sound. They had a single I/O pin that the CPU could toggle on/off, and that digital signal (amplified) directly drove the speaker. That's why PC music of the time tended to be single voice, and the voice was a square wave. (You could do multi-voice, but it sucked up more CPU, was harder to program, tended to sound even uglier, and depended on things that weren't standardized such as the impedance of the driver/filter/speaker circuit.) And you generally got a fairly warbly sound because frequently the CPU would be busy doing something (interrupts disabled - thank you BIOS) and wasn't available to drive the speaker, so the waveform would just get stuck for some random amount of time (until the CPU finished whatever it was doing and re-enabled interrupts).
May I ask what version of IE is that, if that is IE?