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We are slightly adjusting local pricing due to changes in currency exchange rates.

Due to recent significant changes in currency conversion rates, we need to re-evaluate and update the local price values for the products on GOG.com. When preparing for the launch of our local currency payment options we've monitored the conversion rates for 18 months, looking at the average, and rounding it to the closest 0.09. That's how we came up with - for example - the 4.49€ equivalent for the $5.99 price-tag (with 4.51€ being the average converted price out of the previous 18 months). With fairness and clarity in mind, we decided to stick to the prices calculated this way, and only update them if a really considerable change in currency exchange rates would occur.

Unfortunately, this happened much sooner than anyone would expect. There are evident changes in the conversion rates for almost all currencies used on GOG.com. Therefore, we are forced to adjust some of the local-currency prices of the GOG.com catalog items.The prices are changing only by a small margin that allows us to compensate for the recent shifts in currency exchange rates. Here's a representative example of the pricing changes:

For $9,99 games:
- the EUR price was: 7,49; is: 7,99
- the GBP price was: 5,99; is: 6,19
- the AUD price was: 10,89; is: 11,49
- the RUB price was: 359; is: 389

The changes will come into effect on Wednesday, October 1 at 12:00PM GMT. We apologize for any inconvenience this change may be causing you. Please remember that you have the option to switch your preferred currency back to USD in the site's footer.

We will continue to monitor the exchange rates and apply further updates. Hopefully, we'll see the rates reverting to their more beneficial state soon, so that the next small price update can be in everyone's favor. We will communicate any future adjustments in the forum thread for this topic, so please follow it if you're interested in the future development for local prices.
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MarkoH01: I know that. What I meant is that they should do everything like they've done it in the past. I never had a problem wwith the way it was before.
I don't think they are changing things just to upset you.
:)
Post edited October 02, 2014 by madth3
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IAmSinistar: I believe some folks think that bringing back USD-only would also bring back those conditions under which publishers were fine with GOG having different, flat prices versus other vendors. That seems less likely since those publishers have now been exposed as allowing that, and they would be unlikely to reinstate that policy even if GOG did go back to just USD.
Nordic stated that they had no problem with the flat pricing when there was only one currency. Why should their position have changed now?
Things would have been so easier without local pricing. People would worry about exchange rates themselves.

GOG either did it for for financial gain (if they charge more but give the difference back in credit, it binds the consumer and ensures that they spend the money at GOG), or in order to draw more distributors (if you tell EA they can price their international games on GOG just like they do in stores, they are more likely to choose GOG as a platform).

Either makes good business sense and is perfectly understandable.

I just wonder how it weighs against the cost of supporting international currencies. I suppose as long as they stick to PayPal, it should be negligible.

Did Steam make that same adjustment?
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handsfree: Nordic stated that they had no problem with the flat pricing when there was only one currency. Why should their position have changed now?
Because part of their acceptance was that GOG's single-currency kept the fact hidden from the average user. Now that it's been exposed they are less likely to approve of it again, since that could raise hue-and-cry on the internet when people see them supporting preferential pricing to certain vendors.

In other words, it was okay when (almost) nobody knew it was happening. That time has passed.
Still better pricing than Steam.
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IAmSinistar: In other words, it was okay when (almost) nobody knew it was happening. That time has passed.
The only thing that does not add up in that equation is why can Nordic still sell their games for one fair world price (or worldwide equity as they call it there) on Shiny Loot. Its true though that ShinyLoot uses only USD as currency.
Post edited October 03, 2014 by Matruchus
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handsfree: Nordic stated that they had no problem with the flat pricing when there was only one currency. Why should their position have changed now?
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IAmSinistar: Because part of their acceptance was that GOG's single-currency kept the fact hidden from the average user. Now that it's been exposed they are less likely to approve of it again, since that could raise hue-and-cry on the internet when people see them supporting preferential pricing to certain vendors.

In other words, it was okay when (almost) nobody knew it was happening. That time has passed.
In Nordic's case they didn't want to deal with the fluctuating prices of GOG I believe since they had other contracts which they wanted to keep on the same price level and it wasn't worth adjusting prices of games all the time. (this includes having to contact the involved parties each time etc etc)

Their explanation was something to that extent.
Post edited October 03, 2014 by Pheace
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IAmSinistar: In other words, it was okay when (almost) nobody knew it was happening. That time has passed.
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Matruchus: The only thing that does not add up in that equation is why can Nordic still sell their games for one fair world price (or worldwide equity as they call it there) on Shiny Loot. Its true though that ShinyLoot uses only USD as currency.
Ah, a good point, I had forgotten about that. Then at least in the case of one publisher it looks like returning to one currency would allow those game to return flat priced.

What an unholy mess it all is.
Goddamnit, American economy. Stop recovering.
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IAmSinistar: Ah, a good point, I had forgotten about that. Then at least in the case of one publisher it looks like returning to one currency would allow those game to return flat priced.

What an unholy mess it all is.
Not so sure about this one - ShinyLoot is still where GOG used to be only a few months ago, plus I doubt that ShinyLoot gets the traffic that GOG does (both in total numbers and in visitors interested in old(er) games) in order for them to be a real exposure-threat. Is the subject of ShinyLoot being talked about and analysed anywhere else besides here?

If ShinyLoot had made the same changes as GOG, and then had gone back on them and Nordic was still on board, then it'd have been something to draw rough conclusions on.
Strange: if I would pay 9.99 USD via my Euro Paysafecard, like I did b4 the regional pricing was introduced, I would have to pay 7.73 Euros, wich also includes a changing fee of about 15 Eurocents. This means, I would pay less if the regional pricing didn`t exist and the prices were in USD worldwide!
Thanks for the info, but nothing really changes for me. When buying a game, I'll still be comparing prices in different stores, give the DRM-free ones a little more attention (since I like to actually keep the installers just in case) and choose the best deal.
I am willing to pay more for DRM-free games, but there are limits to how much more I'm willing to pay. Try to stay within those limits. Please.
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Maxvorstadt: Strange: if I would pay 9.99 USD via my Euro Paysafecard, like I did b4 the regional pricing was introduced, I would have to pay 7.73 Euros, wich also includes a changing fee of about 15 Eurocents. This means, I would pay less if the regional pricing didn`t exist and the prices were in USD worldwide!
Why is it strange?
I still haven't bought a game from gog since 'The Great News!' nonsense and frankly, this isn't helping one bit.

I've just got no inclination in being supportive of these practices. :( It guts me.

At this point I'm just about ready to call it quits when it comes to games. It's just such a mess and so much bother that I feel like just fucking up and leaving it behind.

That's not just because of gog being morons of course, but they're not helping.
Post edited October 05, 2014 by Stellar_Duck
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Stellar_Duck: At this point I'm just about ready to call it quits when it comes to games. It's just such a mess and so much bother that I feel like just fucking up and leaving it behind.

That's not just because of gog being morons of course, but they're not helping.
Unfortunately I came to that same conclusion. Just blame it on Steam ;)
If even gog has to move away from the principles that convinced me to sign up here (have several hundreds of games on disks but only bought downloads here and on Shiny Loot) I don't want support this industry anymore.
I'll have a lot of time for my other hobbies now. :)