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We are slightly adjusting local pricing due to changes in currency exchange rates.

Due to recent significant changes in currency conversion rates, we need to re-evaluate and update the local price values for the products on GOG.com. When preparing for the launch of our local currency payment options we've monitored the conversion rates for 18 months, looking at the average, and rounding it to the closest 0.09. That's how we came up with - for example - the 4.49€ equivalent for the $5.99 price-tag (with 4.51€ being the average converted price out of the previous 18 months). With fairness and clarity in mind, we decided to stick to the prices calculated this way, and only update them if a really considerable change in currency exchange rates would occur.

Unfortunately, this happened much sooner than anyone would expect. There are evident changes in the conversion rates for almost all currencies used on GOG.com. Therefore, we are forced to adjust some of the local-currency prices of the GOG.com catalog items.The prices are changing only by a small margin that allows us to compensate for the recent shifts in currency exchange rates. Here's a representative example of the pricing changes:

For $9,99 games:
- the EUR price was: 7,49; is: 7,99
- the GBP price was: 5,99; is: 6,19
- the AUD price was: 10,89; is: 11,49
- the RUB price was: 359; is: 389

The changes will come into effect on Wednesday, October 1 at 12:00PM GMT. We apologize for any inconvenience this change may be causing you. Please remember that you have the option to switch your preferred currency back to USD in the site's footer.

We will continue to monitor the exchange rates and apply further updates. Hopefully, we'll see the rates reverting to their more beneficial state soon, so that the next small price update can be in everyone's favor. We will communicate any future adjustments in the forum thread for this topic, so please follow it if you're interested in the future development for local prices.
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sunshinecorp: Because they DID. If GOG enforced its previous fair price policy (and I quote GOG: "because 1 dollar doesn't mean 1 euro") instead of opting to go for regional prices, either publishes would have to bend to GOG's will or games would be left out of its catalogue. We will never know what would be the case with Original Sin, but there's a chance that the publishers would have agreed to GOG's fair price policy, and we'd simply get it for 39.99 dollars instead of 39.99 euros, like we always did before. I'm only using Original Sin as an example.
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Grargar: By now, I meant today, 1 October. :P
???
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sunshinecorp: ???
You were talking about regional pricing in general, while I mistakenly assumed that you were talking about regional pricing being implemented today.
Post edited October 01, 2014 by Grargar
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Novotnus: Once euro and dollar cost the same, publishers will finally decide that 1 euro does not equal 1 dollar :)
This made my day. I wish to take this post and frame it.
high rated
Please GoG.com return to your previous policy "one currency, same flat price worldwide" and let us care about exchange rates as before.

I'm sorry, but I don't like almost all the latest changes here.
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sunshinecorp: ???
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Grargar: You were talking about regional pricing in general, while I mistakenly assumed that you were talking about regional pricing being implemented today.
Ah. Yes. No. :)
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vanchann: Please GoG.com return to your previous policy "one currency, same flat price worldwide" and let us care about exchange rates as before.

I'm sorry, but I don't like almost all the latest changes here.
And countries like ours are the ones that get screwed the most by this. We're called to pay higher prices for some weird reason while our salaries are extremely low and our taxes extremely high.
Post edited October 01, 2014 by sunshinecorp
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sunshinecorp: And countries like ours are the ones that get screwed the most by this. We're called to pay higher prices for some weird reason while our salaries are extremely low and our taxes extremely high.
I'm sorry, I thought I was paying the same price as I did a month ago. $9.99 in both cases. Why are you paying a different price than I am?
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sunshinecorp: And countries like ours are the ones that get screwed the most by this. We're called to pay higher prices for some weird reason while our salaries are extremely low and our taxes extremely high.
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JMich: I'm sorry, I thought I was paying the same price as I did a month ago. $9.99 in both cases. Why are you paying a different price than I am?
See above. I'm talking about regional pricing in general, not the fluctuation in euro/dollar conversion in games that don't use regional pricing.
To explain once more: Games that use the regional pricing model.
Post edited October 01, 2014 by sunshinecorp
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sunshinecorp: To explain once more: Games that use the regional pricing model.
Like D:OS? That one is cheaper. It used to be $54.99, now it's $50.39. So it's not the same, it's cheaper.
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sunshinecorp: To explain once more: Games that use the regional pricing model.
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JMich: Like D:OS? That one is cheaper. It used to be $54.99, now it's $50.39. So it's not the same, it's cheaper.
I just had the exact same conversation with Grargar a few posts above... The. Exact. Same. Conversation.
I give up.
Hurray regional prices! Hurray! Hurray!
Thank you for dropping 5 dollars on a game you overcharge by 15 dollars! Thank you!
Post edited October 01, 2014 by sunshinecorp
*sigh*

I still haven't seen any good come from the introduction of regional pricing, at least nothing that outweighs the bad. We've lost a large number of games from one publisher due to contract issues and games from developers/publishers that were previously fine with flat pricing now have regional pricing. So it seems like most of what GOG has done is to screw up stuff that was already fine. Where are the big releases that we wouldn't have otherwise had?
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sunshinecorp: I give up.
Ok, let's get a bit more serious now.

There are 2 kind of games on GOG. Regionally priced one (like D:OS) and Local currency ones (like Divine Divinity). The Local currency ones use a fixed conversion rate to your local currency. Whether you pay in $USD or €EUR the price difference should be in the cents. With today's conversion rate, the euro price for a $9.99 game is €0.07 more expensive. With the prices GOG used on the 18th, the €EUR price was €0.24 cheaper (exchange rates from here).

Regionally priced ones now.
Yes, it sucks when the price conversion isn't in your favour. However, we did run the numbers for regionally priced games (this post) and even after the correction of my math errors (this post), the difference is still in the cents, assuming you keep buying games on GOG. With this announcement, if you don't buy more games GOG, the regionally priced games are in fact cheaper than they were before.

So, feel free to continue claiming that the games were made more expensive. The regionally priced ones were made cheaper, the local currency ones are still priced the same. At least according to those who pay in $USD.

P.S. Feel free to correct my math, I'm not infallible (or in the words of Λαίδη Άντζελα, "Κανείς δεν είναι άσφαλτος") ;)
Your choice of currency doesn't make a difference, yes. We agree on that. The conversion from dollars to euros would have been automatically been calculated by the credit card issuer or PayPal or whatever you use to pay, since we hold euros in our bank accounts.

Regional pricing isn't about that. It's not about being able to pay in dollars or euros. Flat pricing ("fair price model" as GOG used to call it) meant that all games had the same price, in dollars, worldwide. Meaning, US people paid 10 bucks for it, we also paid 10 bucks for it, converted directly to euros. In regional pricing we see different "zones" with different prices entirely. We don't convert dollars to euros, we just have a different price. Usually, 10 dollars in regional price speak means 10 euros. Whether you choose GOG or your bank to convert the dollars to euros is still your choice, but the price is higher. Original Sin might be 5 dollars cheaper, but that makes it 50 dollars total. When it should be 40 dollars, converted to euros. It is very, very simple and it has nothing to do with math. It has to do with how publishers decide to charge their games regionally.

To put it in much simpler terms, if regional pricing wasn't in effect, Divinity Original Sin WOULD HAVE TO COST 40 DOLLARS FOR EVERYONE, WORLDWIDE. 40 dollars converted to euros is 31 euros. Not 55, and not 50. The difference you see is not in cents. It's in tens of euros.
Post edited October 01, 2014 by sunshinecorp
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sunshinecorp: Regional pricing isn't about that. It's not about being able to pay in dollars or euros.
I am very well aware of what regional pricing is. And I am one of the weirdos who do believe regional pricing as a model is better, but haven't encountered a correct implementation of it so far.

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sunshinecorp: It is very, very simple and it has nothing to do with math. It has to do with how publishers decide to charge their games regionally.
Check the links. Buying the Witcher series (all 3 games) came up cheaper for Greece than US, even though Greece has regional pricing for The Witcher 3. Not sure if the same holds true for the Divinity Series, but I can run the math if you want.
Or better yet, I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader ;)
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sunshinecorp: Regional pricing isn't about that. It's not about being able to pay in dollars or euros.
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JMich: I am very well aware of what regional pricing is. And I am one of the weirdos who do believe regional pricing as a model is better, but haven't encountered a correct implementation of it so far.
Well, you sir are a certified weirdo. :D
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IAmSinistar: Figured this would have to happen sooner or later. Given how the global marketplace "works", sooner was the safe bet. I'm also laying money on "frequent".
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sunshinecorp: I hope GOG drops this regional pricing thing. Not worth it. Not for this little fluctuation here, in general. And publishers that insist on regional pricing should have their heads examined.
You fail to realize they will not have their heads examined, they would simply remove their games from the gog catalogue ifregional pricing is removed.