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Hey

So I'm quite new to GOG, making the full switch quite recently and I'm learning as I get along. And one thing that I have noticed is that a lot of developers don't release content on GOG at the same time (if at all) as on steam.

Now I'm not a developer so I can't comment about how easy it is between GOG and Steam for updates. Also, I can understand that due to the inability to change your review on GOG (which I found quite strange) devs might prefer to hold of on smaller updates or beta releases to prevent their product from being negatively reviewed.

However recently I have noticed more missing content that, in my view, can't be so easily explained. This is the case for artbooks, soundtracks, etc. In some cases a game will have artbook and soundtrack but on GOG will only have the artbook and that's it... One such example is Disco Elysium

Now I've got a bit of a theory of why this might be case, and I might be wrong. I think this is done purposefully to attract more people to steam. Like - we published the game on gog, we made them happy, but in reality we want to have our game controled by DRM and ensure that you play it when and how we want you to.

Now I might be wrong and someone have a totally different view on why this happens, but there are a lot of games that share the exact same issue and from my view it makes no sense from a business point of view. You upload your artbook and soundtrack and that's it .
I don't think any dev or publisher would make a deal with GOG if they really wanted people to buy it on Steam only. It think it's the other way around: significantly more people are attracted to Steam, no matter what you do, and because of that the size of the GOG audience is rather tiny in comparison and some devs just can't be bothered to put in the work and make sure everything is released simultaneously on Steam and GOG, when the grand majority of the audience is found on Steam and on GOG are just the neglectable scraps.

Add to that that part of the delays are also on GOG, because contrary to Steam they repackage new content and patches into their own installers and supposedly also playtest everything. According to what some devs say, they also seem to fail to respond in a timely fashion sometimes, which must be frustrating for the devs. And usually changes are integrated via Galaxy much faster than for the offline installers. And who knows, maybe the soundtrack for Disco Elysium is not here because GOG didn't think anyone here would want to pay $12 for it? All we can do is speculate uselessly.
Post edited August 15, 2020 by Leroux
there are some developers / publishers who fail to release some content, patches and updates. Two of the reasons are
1) There are not enough sales of the product to make it worth their while spending time making patches updates GOG friendly. Galaxy makes it easier than an offline installer patch, but if sales are low here, they sometimes consider it not worth the time, especially if they are busy doing other projects.

2) To make patches / updates for Steam is less problematic than it is for GOG's offline installers. Good sales or not, this is seen by some devs / pubs as something they'll "get around to".

I believe GOG is aware of this and probably try to get a "timely update" agreement when a deal is proposed, but they just don't follow through what can GOG do? Maybe not take on the next game but that's about it.

The community here are VERY aware of this and there is a thread devoted to it...

https://www.gog.com/forum/general/games_that_treat_gog_customers_as_second_class_citizens_v2

As you can see it is now on V2, and not very big!
Not entirely sure but in cases like the mentioned missing Disco Elysium soundtrack it may not be the developer/publisher's fault but actually the artist or composer (still retaining full rights over their work) who, for whatever reason refuse to release their work here on GoG, DRM-free and all that.
For Disco Elysium's soundtrack that would be the band British Sea Power, and they may not be OK with releasing on a platform where you basically don't have that much control over your work as on other platforms where there's also an integrated in-house solution for playing back the soundtrack, for example.

Overload and it's still absent soundtrack on GoG would be another one of those cases.
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Swedrami: For Disco Elysium's soundtrack that would be the band British Sea Power, and they may not be OK with releasing on a platform where you basically don't have that much control over your work as on other platforms where there's also an integrated in-house solution for playing back the soundtrack, for example.
Wait... if you buy a soundtrack on Steam you don't get to download the files? That's nuts. I thought music downloads were one of the areas where DRM had died out (aside from streaming obviously).
In Disco Elysium's case it's even more strange since the soundtrack has been available on British Sea Power's bandcamp since release back in October last year, and you can purchase what essentially amounts to a DRM-free offline copy of the soundtrack (in various file formats) from there.
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Swedrami: For Disco Elysium's soundtrack that would be the band British Sea Power, and they may not be OK with releasing on a platform where you basically don't have that much control over your work as on other platforms where there's also an integrated in-house solution for playing back the soundtrack, for example.
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my name is coole catte: Wait... if you buy a soundtrack on Steam you don't get to download the files? That's nuts. I thought music downloads were one of the areas where DRM had died out (aside from streaming obviously).
No idea how it exactly works, but I'm relatively sure about this integrated player solution.
Which may or may not be the only way of accessing/listening to soundtracks purchased over there?
Post edited August 15, 2020 by Swedrami
There are also many games available here that don't include the Linux version of them (many Square Enix games and others where the Linux version was outsourced).
Absolutely. Nicalis, Inc., Team Meat LLC, Nicklas Nygren, Ludosity AB, these various names and companies have absolutely nothing to lose by releasing their games here, and yet...
There is a huge thread on this here on GOG.

https://www.gog.com/forum/general/games_that_treat_gog_customers_as_second_class_citizens_v2/page1

and that is version 2.

Is it purposeful? Clearly it is, if the content is available elsewhere.

Personally I simply do not bother entertaining such practices. I am prepared to wait for a set length of time, don't get me wrong, but persistant offenders- they just join my blacklist.

Sometimes you have to accept that some companies do not wish to cater for your needs and move on.
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R-U-N: However recently I have noticed more missing content that, in my view, can't be so easily explained. This is the case for artbooks, soundtracks, etc. In some cases a game will have artbook and soundtrack but on GOG will only have the artbook and that's it... One such example is Disco Elysium
Sometimes it could be a contractual issue. Eg, if a publisher licenses the use of songs for a soundtrack (without owning it), then signing an agreement to release soundtrack as a paid extra on Steam may not 'translate' to an agreement to automatically be allowed to be sold on every other store at a later date, so publisher would then have to go back to soundtrack copyright owners and get them to sign a new contract with GOG, (but since publishers are generally chronically lazy people...)
After watching 3 or 4 pages of "Worms Series" forums (i wish there were tabs for each game categorically); i still haven't found anything that tells me if the recently bought Worms: W.M.D Online Multiplayer can work, or how to make it work.
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my name is coole catte: Wait... if you buy a soundtrack on Steam you don't get to download the files?
You do.

Edit: and now you can also buy OSTs for games you dont own, and theres quite a few free OSTs to boot.
Post edited August 15, 2020 by Sachys
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Sachys: You do.
And they're DRM-free? DRM on downloaded audio is pretty much dead at this point.

Well that concern can't be the reason the soundtracks aren't on GOG then...
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Sachys: Edit: and now you can also buy OSTs for games you dont own, and theres quite a few free OSTs to boot.
Well that's just sensible. GOG's "SOUNDTRACK IS DLC!!! DLC WON'T WORK WITHOUT THE BASE GAME!!!!" approach is nonsense.
Post edited August 15, 2020 by my name is coole catte
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my name is coole catte:
Yes and yes.

The only issue is theres no seperation of FLAC and regular MP3 so you have to download both as a singular package.

I am surprised Valve never opened up free OST streaming through the client though (as a means of advertising OSTs for sale and keeping people on the service for more hours of the day).


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my name is coole catte: Well that concern can't be the reason the soundtracks aren't on GOG then...
I would say its mostly contractual / sales based. On steam sales would be high enough that somebody taking a 30% cut of sales wouldnt matter so much, but on gog thats gonna be less money and if a band / composer wants better exposure then theyd want people to visit bandcamp etc.
Post edited August 15, 2020 by Sachys
If Steam Grants a X per cent per sale, you as developer gain Y€ per sale.
If GOG (or others) grant X per cent (It can be more or it can be less) you as a developer gain Y€ per sale.
It would be always a plus even if Steam is your main Selling revenue platform.

Even if GOG offers a fewer revenue per sale comparing to Epic or Steam (Just thinking out loud, I ignore the numbers) That money is cheap money.

So, the only reason to not offer the title in GOG I can think about, is laziness or voluntary doubts about the DRM Free principle convenience.

The former has cure. The latter does not.