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I apologize if someone has already said this, as a matter of fact I am surprised no one has had.

But at least I have not been buying games I want since the dollar was become very expensive as of late. The thing is, I do not live in the USA, my country is in what many call Latinameica. Language differences aside, we do not have the dollar as our main currency nor we have the same income level.

I have seen that Steam does take this into account when selling their games. I know it is probably too much of a headache to add the mexican peso or even add latin america as a new region and gauge how much should we pay, but I have an easier solution, can you let natives of latinamerica pay in rubles the same prices Russia gets for games?

I know this suggestion will probably wont be heard by the powers that be, but the sImple reality is that I can no longer pay this prices, they were high before so I mostly waited for big sales, but now even cheap prices look too high for my meager pocket money. I am sure sales for gog would positively surge if they implemented said scheme fot the region (people in colombia, peru, chile and brasil would buy a lot more than now) but I know FUD wins most of the time -_-

Alea acta est
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mangamuscle: Alea acta est
Not going with la suerte esta echada? ;)

It isn't a decision that GOG can make, to allow other countries to pay Russia's regional pricing. GOG isn't big enough - Steam isn't big enough - to make a decision like that and survive the fallout. Your suggestion isn't completely nonsense, but it just isn't feasible. There's more at play than just "how much money can I get for another copy of Pac-Man" and, sadly, you're one of the people who gets the less fair treatment in the whole mess.
There's also the fact that the value of the Russian Ruble is falling faster than a stalled airplane thanks to people thinking it would be smart to invest all resources in a single thing. 1 Russian Ruble equals 0.013 US Dollar, currently.

In fact, and quite simply, the Peso is currently worth MORE than the 1923 Deutschmark--I mean Ruble. 1 Mexican Peso equals 0.055 US Dollar.

(Also, the Ruble isn't really used in international trade, whereas the Peso is traded globally.)
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OneFiercePuppy: Your suggestion isn't completely nonsense, but it just isn't feasible.
I would not mind if gog did something else to address somehow the region income disparity. As it is now they hardly acknowledge a whole continenent (plus 1/3) but give Russia deferential treatment (and they are less than one continent). Not only steam acknowledges the fact and has five local latinamerican currencies, Netflix also has a different price tag while retaining most of the original catalog, heck even crunchyroll has a lower pricetag, so saying game companies are hard to deal with does not fly since hollywood movie studios and japanese anime studios are a lot harder to deal with but yet we have fair treatment there.

I know some people will not like the idea because they prefer the "one price for all the world", but that is imo nonsense, gog does not sell commodities like oil or grain, so it is feasible to change the price for non strategic markets, almost no one would go to the movies in china if the ticket price were the same you pay in los angeles.

Sorry for the rant, but I got worked up since I know I have failed, this post will fall into obscurity and this will become yet another unsolved problem, feels like I am dealing with politicians -_-
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Darvond: 1 Russian Ruble equals 0.013 US Dollar, currently.
And 1 Hungarian Forint equals 0.00348584 USD ( 0.263960 Russian Ruble ) .
Yeah, I haven't bought any games on GOG for a very long time because of this. I can't in good conscience pay twice as much for a game just to get it on GOG. I like DRM-free, but the price difference is too great for me not to buy it on Steam. Even Pillars of Eternity which I was given a backer key for, I had to choose Steam, because I knew how expensive the expansions would be here.

I don't think there's anything we can do about it though, aside from waiting and hoping economies change and our currencies become stronger. We can't use russian regional prices, if we did then other regions would argue for the right to do the same, it would ruin the entire regional pricing system if you can just pick the cheapest region everytime. Likely they would just scrap the whole thing in that situation.
on a global scale, the USD price is the price that it costs. the developer could have developed in the US. and that's what they plan for.

Rebel Galaxy was more here than when it went on sale over at Steam but here the developer got a fairly decent price for a great game. so. I mean it's one thing when you're paying significantly more than the USD price but, I mean just buy on Steam. from a weaker-currency standpoint, if you have an option, great. go with that. if it becomes a problem for gog, eventually they'll roll out more regional pricing for places with weaker currencies.
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johnnygoging: if you have an option, great. go with that. if it becomes a problem for gog, eventually they'll roll out more regional pricing for places with weaker currencies.
This has been a point of contention on gog for a long time, and at one point a spark of a good old forum rebellion.

But it's plainly clear that more and more potential customers from places with lower per capita will begin to shift the focus to more regional pricing.
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johnnygoging: on a global scale, the USD price is the price that it costs. the developer could have developed in the US. and that's what they plan for.
That is not quite true, since gog sells software (games, movies, tv series), not hardware. So game companies expectative is to sell a certain number of copies at a certain price in developed countries, any extra income from the so called "emerging markets" is an extra not taken into consideration as part of their initial sales goal required to recover production costs. It is news worthy when a movie (Pacific Rim, Battleship) managed to stay out of red ink thanks to sales in emerging markets, but those sales come at a lower price, which is common sense if you ask me.

If anything, gog has already a problem in their hands, since their sales in latinamerica could be higher if they imprlemented a lower price scheme, gog can continue to do nothing and let steam get most of the sales, Like Marie Antoinette never said "Let them eat steam".