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tinyE: if it helps I've already had cataracts

twice :D
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nightcraw1er.488: Me too, great heavy cavalry for breaking down light and heavy infantry.
RIMSHOT
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nightcraw1er.488: Me too, great heavy cavalry for breaking down light and heavy infantry.
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tinyE: RIMSHOT
Can I keep that giff for all my future jokes?
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tinyE: RIMSHOT
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nightcraw1er.488: Can I keep that giff for all my future jokes?
It's not mine, do with it what you want. :D
As an American I really HATE the fact we never got the CD32. That console was what I wished the original Xbox had been, instead of all those FPS ports they could've had all those Adventure game ports instead. ^_^
I must admit I was disgusted with how CD32 handled video inputs though, with no outright RGB or SCART from what I heard. What was THAT all about?!
So the CD32 beat 3DO to the punch? I remember they were out about the same time and the 3DO seemed 'next gen' and the sexiest thing in console gaming. Looking back the games for each system never really delivered a decent catalogue. Same with Atari Jaguar, 64 bit console, which wasn't graphically impressive.

I'm glad I stuck to PC gaming and hung out until the PS1 years later which was genuinely next gen.
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supplementscene: So the CD32 beat 3DO to the punch? I remember they were out about the same time and the 3DO seemed 'next gen' and the sexiest thing in console gaming. Looking back the games for each system never really delivered a decent catalogue. Same with Atari Jaguar, 64 bit console, which wasn't graphically impressive.

I'm glad I stuck to PC gaming and hung out until the PS1 years later which was genuinely next gen.
Meh I still want one but then I want a Marty and a CD-i.
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Telika: Wasn't this console one of Commodore's strategy decisions that lead to bankrupcy ?
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Doc0075: They were screwed before the CD32 wasting their money on many pointless Commodore variants. C16, C128, Plus 4, CDTV, A600 and so on.
They had the most popular 8 bit computer and then the most advanced 16 bit with the A500 but the people running Commodore really didn't have a clue with what they were doing. With better leadership we could all be using Commodores to this day.
They had a once-popular, but dying 8-bit platform that they failed to further on their own (C16, +4, C128), and bought Amiga instead. Those 3 had nothing to do with the later decline. The CDTV was probably a big loss, but bad timing for release. The A600, though, was utter crap - trying to make the already low-end A500 even cheaper. Also, your statement about the A500 is wrong: the A500 was not very advanced for its time, as the A1000 seemed to kick the competition into gear years before (and the A500 was no better than, and in some ways inferior to the A1000). And no, we wouldn't be using Commodores (or Amigas) to this day, as major software vendors were abandoning it in droves before the aga models even came out. See Darklands for a game that looks and feels like an Amiga game, but wasn't released for the Amiga (supposedly because Amiga users generally didn't have hard drives, in an era where most PC users did - so much for your statement of being advanced). AGA was too little, too late. The CD32 was an unimpressive machine in an era with 3D around the corner.

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Spectre: and a proper windows style OS before microsoft.
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Doc0075: Microsoft actually approached Commodore to provide the operating system for the Amiga. I can't remember the exact reason why Commodore turned them down but it was money related.
The lack of DOS and Microsoft Word and what have you is one of the reasons for Commodores failure to establish itself in the business market, which was its main target.
Source? This sounds like utter BS to me. Given that software relied heavily on its target hardware, the fact that the Amiga was completely different from PC clones means running DOS wouldn't have gained them jack. Word didn't even exist at the time the Amiga came out, and took years to become the defacto standard (and, in fact, the defacto standard of the time, Word Perfect, was ported to the Amiga, and in fact I bought a copy as part of a bundle for my A500).

As with almost all arguments about how great an OS or hardware is/isn't, it's pointless. It's all about the apps. Even claims that the Amiga was a better gaming machine are drowned out by the game developers only targeting PC clones and more popular consoles. Eventually the PC games stopped being speaker beeps and CGA/EGA graphics, and that was the end of the window for the Amiga to take over the world.

I held onto my Amiga (and 8-bit Commodores) longer than most people, so I obviously loved the machines. This distortion of facts does nobody any service, though.
IMO

The Commodore was a great and still is a great machine. Back in the days of home games. Commodore, Atari, Nintendo, Colico(spelling can't remember) Apple ii and two other systems escaping my mind the game makers were providing their games to the various hardware. Of course Nintendo was closed off to the others. But SSI had for their games various outlets. The PC was just getting started because of the Blue Chip PCs, Tandy PCs (Radio Shacks) IBM PCs and the Amiga's.

I really don't know what pushed the game makers away from the others and onto just PCs? But I guess the idea that a PC is only for work changed. I knew more people who had some sort of Atari system or Commodore or actually Apple ii and iie systems than a PC. Very few houses had a PC such as the Tandy, Blue Chip and Amiga. Amiga and Atari ST went head to head and were interesting in what they had to offer. Miss those systems.
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Doc0075: They were screwed before the CD32 wasting their money on many pointless Commodore variants. C16, C128, Plus 4, CDTV, A600 and so on.
They had the most popular 8 bit computer and then the most advanced 16 bit with the A500 but the people running Commodore really didn't have a clue with what they were doing. With better leadership we could all be using Commodores to this day.
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darktjm: They had a once-popular, but dying 8-bit platform that they failed to further on their own (C16, +4, C128), and bought Amiga instead. Those 3 had nothing to do with the later decline. The CDTV was probably a big loss, but bad timing for release. The A600, though, was utter crap - trying to make the already low-end A500 even cheaper. Also, your statement about the A500 is wrong: the A500 was not very advanced for its time, as the A1000 seemed to kick the competition into gear years before (and the A500 was no better than, and in some ways inferior to the A1000). And no, we wouldn't be using Commodores (or Amigas) to this day, as major software vendors were abandoning it in droves before the aga models even came out. See Darklands for a game that looks and feels like an Amiga game, but wasn't released for the Amiga (supposedly because Amiga users generally didn't have hard drives, in an era where most PC users did - so much for your statement of being advanced). AGA was too little, too late. The CD32 was an unimpressive machine in an era with 3D around the corner.

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Doc0075: Microsoft actually approached Commodore to provide the operating system for the Amiga. I can't remember the exact reason why Commodore turned them down but it was money related.
The lack of DOS and Microsoft Word and what have you is one of the reasons for Commodores failure to establish itself in the business market, which was its main target.
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darktjm: Source? This sounds like utter BS to me. Given that software relied heavily on its target hardware, the fact that the Amiga was completely different from PC clones means running DOS wouldn't have gained them jack. Word didn't even exist at the time the Amiga came out, and took years to become the defacto standard (and, in fact, the defacto standard of the time, Word Perfect, was ported to the Amiga, and in fact I bought a copy as part of a bundle for my A500).

As with almost all arguments about how great an OS or hardware is/isn't, it's pointless. It's all about the apps. Even claims that the Amiga was a better gaming machine are drowned out by the game developers only targeting PC clones and more popular consoles. Eventually the PC games stopped being speaker beeps and CGA/EGA graphics, and that was the end of the window for the Amiga to take over the world.

I held onto my Amiga (and 8-bit Commodores) longer than most people, so I obviously loved the machines. This distortion of facts does nobody any service, though.
Aren't you an angry individual. The A500 was a refined, more cost effective take on the A1000 which was too expensive to compete with the ST. It was also streets ahead of Atari and PCs when it was released in early 1987.
They failed to build on the superiority of their hardware leaving the door open for PCs to advance ahead of the Amiga. Yes Amiga were purchased by Commodore, I never said it wasn't.
They lost a lot of money on the C16, Plus/4 and C128 so how that didn't contribute to their decline is beyond me. They didn't just start losing money in the nineties, it was a long running problem stemming from Commodores poor decision making and lack of leadership.
They lost money on CDTV and the A600 so I don't see why you are arguing against me there.
To sum up Commodore management, Mehdi Ali.

You only have to look at how the A500 was marketed in the US where it bombed compared to the marketing strategy in the UK and Europe. Commodore International were blind to the computers gaming capabilities and instead pushed it as a business machine to compete with Apple and IBM.

They were originally approached by Microsoft to provide the operating system for the Amiga, I either read it in one of the recently released books on the Amiga or maybe it was in one of the programs that have been made about it.
I suppose I should go back and find out which one for you so that you can lose that chip from your shoulder.
The Amiga 500 wasn't that expensive compared to proper PC's which had high costs until the start of this century.
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Telika: Wasn't this console one of Commodore's strategy decisions that lead to bankrupcy ?
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Doc0075: They were screwed before the CD32 wasting their money on many pointless Commodore variants. C16, C128, Plus 4, CDTV, A600 and so on.
They had the most popular 8 bit computer and then the most advanced 16 bit with the A500 but the people running Commodore really didn't have a clue with what they were doing. With better leadership we could all be using Commodores to this day.
It sounds the same as sega with all their experiments inbetween the megadrive and dreamcast.
Post edited November 10, 2017 by Spectre
Happy birthday, CD32. I was spending my money on upgrading my A1200 at the time, so I never knew ye, but you were a part of my Amiga family nonetheless.

Signed, someone who used Amiga as a primary computer up to 2001.
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Doc0075: Aren't you an angry individual.
Whatever. I guess you've got me all figured out. Sorry for replying in the first place. The negative reputation of Amiga fans must be accurate, after all. Makes me sorry I ever owned one.

Oh, and I did actually play games on a CD32 someone I knew owned. I wasn't interested in consoles at the time, so I wasn't even aware it was only available outside the US; this guy must've imported his. I was, however, aware that they only manufactured ~100k, and that demand was much higher. While discussing what we would do if we won the Powerball at the time, we all agreed that we would make more CD32s (I guess we were all deluded at the time, but some of us learned our lessons and moved on).