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Ganni1987: GOG seems to stick to Ubuntu LTS releases for official support and for 32bit games they can simply keep listing that as latest supported.
That sounds like a bad idea. GOG better find another distro which doesn't plan to drop multiarch with 32-bit x86.

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immi101: sure, they can do that for some time. But at some point official support for Ubuntu 18.04 (and earlier) will run out. And selling games that only work on outdated & no longer supported platforms isn't really a convincing business strategy ;)
Exactly. Better be pro-active about it for GOG.
Post edited June 20, 2019 by shmerl
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ped7g: There's no issue with commercial SW, even legacy one, but with closed source SW. (…)
Almost all commercial software is closed source. Anything else is, sadly, completely unrealistic. If you consider closed source software dead on arrival, you shouldn't buy any games. HyperRogue and KeeperRL are the only games I can think of at the top of my head that are open source and still in development. I'm sure that there are other examples, but they are very rare.

And if you think that 99% of the important software is open source, you are deluding yourself. If that was the case everyone would be using only open source software and open source operation systems would dominate the market. And, sadly, they don't – unless you are only talking about servers. Ironically many people that are dismissive on Linux, and I include GOG in this, use websites that are hosted on Linux servers or use Linux servers for their infrastructure (hello, GOG).

Without lib32 you will also lose access to many Windows titles through wine. I'm glad that I ditched everything that that user un-friendly company Ubuntu dictates (Unity, Mir, …).
Just have read about that.

Not very surprised with Canonical doing nonsense again.

I have already say that in the early days of gog supporting Linux, gog shouldn't have chosen to support Ubuntu. They should have chosen Debian, Arch, Fedora (or CentOS for LTS) instead of 2 versions of Ubuntu.

I still have in mind how a few Linux native games sold here are currently very difficult to make them working on Fedora, or even unplayable because of libraries. The whole "curl and gnutls against openssl" thing for instance.
For example, I have to use Wine and the windows version to play Mount & Blade: Warband...

So I believe that gog will drop "Linux" support since now Ubuntu drops good old games' support.

During that, Microsoft is laughing.
And a new official partner aswell.

Oh well.
Post edited June 21, 2019 by Huinehtar
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Huinehtar: I have already say that in the early days of gog supporting Linux, gog shouldn't have chosen to support Ubuntu. They should have chosen Debian, Arch, Fedora (or CentOS for LTS) instead of 2 versions of Ubuntu.
Alternative: just support Linux. State the required dependencies, but try to bundle as much as possible. IMO relying on the packages for any given distro too much was never a good idea; distros evolve and eventually people end up having to hunt for random outdated .so files to get their old Linux game working well on a new version of once-supported-in-the-past distro.

IMO supporting a specific distro is kinda like supporting a specific brand of PC (you need a Dell or HP to play this game!) instead of the internals. Doesn't that sound silly? It is.

I still have in mind how a few Linux native games sold here are currently very difficult to make them working on Fedora, or even unplayable because of libraries. The whole "curl and gnutls against openssl" thing for instance.
For example, I have to use Wine and the windows version to play Mount & Blade: Warband...
Idk, I've gamed on Fedora for a few years now and while there were a few hiccups, I always got things working if said things worked on Linux at all. I could've sworn I played Warband too.

So I believe that gog will drop "Linux" support since now Ubuntu drops good old games' support.
I'd say that's a poor prediction, but given how little GOG seems to care for Linux right now, yeah, I don't know..
Post edited June 21, 2019 by clarry
When I click play, and try to load a saved game, it goes back to the starting screen where I have to click play again. I tried playing this on two different screens, my wife and mine, and it stll won't play. Any idea how I can fix this?
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gwhambone1:
A little bit more information, if you please. Distro and version? Game and version? Wine or native?
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clarry: Alternative: just support Linux. State the required dependencies, but try to bundle as much as possible. IMO relying on the packages for any given distro too much was never a good idea; distros evolve and eventually people end up having to hunt for random outdated .so files to get their old Linux game working well on a new version of once-supported-in-the-past distro.

IMO supporting a specific distro is kinda like supporting a specific brand of PC (you need a Dell or HP to play this game!) instead of the internals. Doesn't that sound silly? It is.
I agree with you on all this, but gog seemed relunctant to support Linux as a whole, because they were maybe afraid of Linux customers angry that X game doesn't work in Y Linux distro which is a Z unknown fork of a Omega distro...

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clarry: Idk, I've gamed on Fedora for a few years now and while there were a few hiccups, I always got things working if said things worked on Linux at all. I could've sworn I played Warband too.
I would be very interested in how you did it made working, because I have tried many things for years, like using the tutorial for Don't Starve (using symlinks and dl ubuntu libraries put in game folder), but it always failed because curl-gnutls isn't compiled the same way in debian derivates and in redhat distros.

WARNING: the war has begun

Valve plans to drop support for Ubuntu 19.10 and up
Post edited June 22, 2019 by Huinehtar
low rated
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shmerl: I'd say those who use Ubuntu or Mint can move to Debian proper (I'd recommend Debian testing). It would be least disrupting for them, than let's say moving to Arch, Fedora or openSUSE.
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adamhm: I guess it's possible that Mint could provide 32-bit packages themselves (or collaborate with another group to do so), but I think it's most likely that Mint will switch to using Debian as the base instead. Linux Mint Debian Edition already exists as a contingency plan:

LMDE is a Linux Mint project and it stands for "Linux Mint Debian Edition".

Its main goal is for the Linux Mint team to see how viable our distribution would be and how much work would be necessary if Ubuntu was ever to disappear. LMDE aims to be as similar as possible to Linux Mint, but without using Ubuntu. The package base is provided by Debian instead.
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adamhm: Whatever happens, I'm going to look into the alternatives and have a plan ready.

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shmerl: Are there any newer games that are 32-bit? The last such outlier I remember was Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun. Developers there really struggled, but didn't manage to make 64-bit version work due to some messed up middleware. So it got stuck at 32-bit.
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adamhm: It's primarily legacy software that will be affected. In addition to games, this move will especially hurt Wine given the vast amount of 32-bit only Windows software that exists.
https://usdreport.com
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Huinehtar: WARNING: the war has begun

Valve plans to drop support for Ubuntu 19.10 and up
As with any war, there will be loses everywhere, and it will look ugly.

But yes, at least there's no subtle dancing around and those shots are very clear and immediate, well played Valve, if it has to be like this, better do it precisely like this.

Now let's guess when GOG's position on linux support will be clear and well communicated.... :D :D :D (/sarcasm)
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ped7g: Now let's guess when GOG's position on linux support will be clear and well communicated.... :D :D :D (/sarcasm)
I know the answer! It's SOON!
Is it only me or does the mojo-installer shipped with numerous games only support single thread unzip?

Unzipping a 30GB file is pretty slow even on a 5GHz CPU when it is only single thread.
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Pholostan: Is it only me or does the mojo-installer shipped with numerous games only support single thread unzip?

Unzipping a 30GB file is pretty slow even on a 5GHz CPU when it is only single thread.
Yes, it's not using mutlithreaded decompression. GOG should overhaul their installer, get rid of ancient GTK2 and replace it with Qt, use some modern compression format (XZ for example), enable multithreading for decompression, stop creating garbage directories like $HOME/.gnome and so on.

But given low amount of resources GOG allocates for Linux support, I don't see any of that improving any time soon. They can't even enable Galaxy for it which GOG today prioritize, so surely they won't bother polishing installers.
Post edited June 23, 2019 by shmerl
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shmerl: Yes, it's not using mutlithreaded decompression. GOG should overhaul their installer, get rid of ancient GTK2 and replace it with Qt, use some modern compression format (XZ for example), enable multithreading for decompression, stop creating garbage directories like $HOME/.gnome and so on.
So it isn't just me missing something, thanks. Yeah, not too hot about the ooold GTK stuff, single thread compression etc. Was also wondering where that .gnome came from, lol.

Hoping for an update.
So Valve has released an official statement about Linux

Things will be interesting to see.
While Debian and OpenSuse have already been mentionned earlier, this statement mentions directly distributions such as Arch, Manjaro, Pop!_OS and Fedora.

I'm sure that gog staff is currently in a "wait and see" mode. Maybe they have been previously told by Canonical that 32 bit libraries would be dropped, so the very idea of Galaxy on Linux has to be on hold since Canonical endangered seriously the very idea of gog games on Linux. But maybe gog felt they didn't have the power to change drastically the Linux distribution ecosystem, choosing another distribution as default, and Valve during that time knew too but hoped that Canonical would reconsider, so when Canonical made their announcement, Valve striked back while gog is still waiting for what Valve will do.
In that theory, the whole thing would severely delay Galaxy for Linux.


We, DRM-free Linux players, will have to be in a "wait and see" mode, too.
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Huinehtar: We, DRM-free Linux players, will have to be in a "wait and see" mode, too.
I don't see a problem for those who aren't using Ubuntu at least. Just continue using what you are using in such case :)