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What are your general (subjective, objective, whatever) opinions? Personally I'll have to lean towards Intel, since it's easier to work with in Linux from my experience. The integrated Intel card I have isn't very powerful, but I've heard that newer cards (HD4000+) are very good. My AMD card works fine too, using the open source drivers. I've heard that the Nvidia proprietary drivers are good under Linux, though some things about Nvidia like their business practices make me feel..... wary about them.

Keep it civil please ;) (don't want any flamewars, we've had enough of those recently)

Oh, and a strawpoll too, because why not?

http://strawpoll.me/5162118
Post edited August 09, 2015 by BillyMaysFan59
AMD is my preference. Not very expensive, good price-performance ratio and good software support in the form of drivers and and proprietary tech. I'm currently on Windows only though.
I developed a real appreciation for the 11.6" form factor laptop when I was working overseas and needed to have two laptops with me at all times (and had three, because I wasn't about to be without a personal laptop...). Since they tend to use integrated graphics, I got to try out playing games on the HD4000 series chipsets; and since the laptops were little, they were usually 1366x768 resolution. HD4000 played Deus Ex: Human Revolution, Divinity 2: Ego Draconis, Skyrim, Witcher 2, Warlock 2, and XCOM: Enemy Unknown just fine at 1366x768 with most settings on high (except draw distance, where available).

I'm quite impressed by the little Intel that could. I wouldn't use it for desktop graphics but it's definitely good enough for all my mobile needs.
NVIDIA. My first NVIDIA card was a 440 MX, since then I always bought NVIDIA. I loved the way they used one driver for all cards, that was making it very easy to use a NVIDIA card. In 2006 or 2007 ATI (wich was sold to AMD later) began to use the same kind of drivers, but before that it was really difficult to find the right driver for an ATI card. I`m also using NVIDIA because I don`t know how good an AMD card works together with non AMD CPUs.
I prefer Intel because their GPUs are the best supported with open source drivers on Linux. (Just stay away from the GMA 500 if buying older hardware.)
If you can tolerate bit high temperature go for AMD.
If you have some spare bucks and you want performance beast go for Nvidia.
If you want high temperature and don't have extra bucks. Well that's where Intel comes in.
Intel is budget friendly gpu wih decent performance but some games have trouble to run on it.
My vote is for Nvidia although I am an Intel user.
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OneFiercePuppy: I'm quite impressed by the little Intel that could. I wouldn't use it for desktop graphics but it's definitely good enough for all my mobile needs.
All I use is a laptop and I mostly play older (or less graphically demanding, if newer) games, so if I had an HD4000 it would be more than perfect for my needs.

The Intel card I have is a 4500MHD, though, which isn't very powerful. Thankfully it's part of a hybrid GPU setup in my laptop so I can fire up my discrete GPU for heavier duty gaming.
Post edited August 09, 2015 by BillyMaysFan59
I have a soft spot for Imagination Technology, the way they started with the PC and managed to survive by turning their tech to mobile. Plus they're going to have ray tracing on their chips soon.
intel gpu? O_o
I have a preference for NVidia cards. My first GPU was in my windows 98 machine, and it had a GeForce MX 440 and than I went to the GeForce FX 5200 card, than GeForce 6800, than 9400 GT, and now I have a GeForce GT 220.

I like how the drivers for NVidia are basically plug and play, you download the driver, and it installs. Configuring the video settings for the GPU are easy in the control panel the driver comes with. I never had issues with NVidia really, except the 9400 card melted lol.

I never really liked integrated GPUs due to the fact it is harder to play games at higher settings, but Intel's new HD 4400+ GPUs do have direct x 11 support so they are getting better. Never liked AMD/ATI just because I always liked NVidia's drivers, and stayed with them. "The way it is meant to be played" was a good advertising thing on some boxes of games for PC.
The one that performs best, I guess?
NVIDIA because with an NVIDIA card, you wont have to deal with problems related to PhysX or whatever that shit is called.
Post edited August 09, 2015 by monkeydelarge
So far, i've had two previous ATI/AMD cards, both overheated and died after about 2.5- 3 years (no overclocking). Every nVidia card i've had has ended up being retired and replaced through becoming too old and slow. My original nVidia TNT is still going strong in my retro DOS/Win 98 PC.
I'm no big fan of AMD, when i used to build lots of systems for people i noticed trends...Intel systems and nVidia gpu's never had any issues- not a single reported problem ever. AMD-many issues, so i came to not trust them. Whether long term reliability matters though in the PC industry, is open to debate...why make something to last 50 years when it's obsolete in 5?

Also AMD legacy driver support leaves a bit to be desired, anyone tried playing Neverwinter Nights with a newish AMD graphics card?
Post edited August 09, 2015 by CMOT70
nVidia. I had a computer with AMD parts and it just took no time at all to turn to crap. The other 2 computers were made from decent parts and the GPUs I put in were nVidia of some kind:
First one was an EVGA 8500 GT and second was an MSI GTX 650. Both of those did well/are doing well for me. By all means the MSI is better than the EVGA was in terms of reliability and quality but that 8500 did me pretty well on games like BF2 and CoD 4 demo as well as Men of War and Order of War (when I still used my Steam account). Now, the 650 does not work with Sacred but that's fine 'cause it works really well with everything else.
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CMOT70: Whether long term reliability matters though in the PC industry, is open to debate...why make something to last 50 years when it's obsolete in 5?
I always like knowing what I have will last me a long while since I can't just replace it when the next crop of stuff comes along. Not to mention, even if I replace a computer I don't get rid of it. Never know if I might need it for anything.
Post edited August 09, 2015 by AnimalMother117
I don't have a real preference though I never used Intel GPU's.
Both AMD and Nvidia have their quirks so I let it mostly depend on which card is the best value for the money at the moment of purchase.
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monkeydelarge: NVIDIA because with an NVIDIA card, you wont have to deal with problems related to PhysX or whatever that shit is called.
Well you have PhysX hardware support if that is what you mean, though I still ran into a lot of driverproblems related to PhysX with my Nvidia card some of which I didn't have with my AMD PC funny enough.