It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like:Chrome,Firefox,Internet Explorer orOpera

×
arrow-down2arrowcart2close4fat-arrow-leftfat-arrow-rightfeedbackfriends2happy-facelogo-gognotificationnotifications-emptyownedremove-menusad-facesearch2wishlist-menuwishlisted2own_thingsheartstartick
This could be really offensive to some people, especially people that may already be in the video game development field, but if you are offended by this, I apologize, as that is really not my intention.

I am a teenager in high school, and ever since my parents introduced me to video games, I've always wanted to be a video game developer and implement my ideas into interactive creations, but it's only in the last 2 years that I've realized what the development of video games actually entails, especially if you're an independent developer. I saw a game on Steam called "Dev Guy" and looked at the reviews for it a little bit, and one of the reviews said, "I was developing my game, and I didn't want to anymore because of this game. It even has a virtual catgirl and a body pillow. This hits way too close to home." Before that, I was reading an article about the conditions of video game development, and I can't recall if it was one of the passages in the article or one of the comments on it, but there was something that said many video game programmers were antisocial people, because it required so much time at a computer that it attracted a certain type of person. I wasn't really sure what to make of all of this, mostly because I just brushed it off because that was probably just from the experience of those people, but then I really started to think, "Is the video game development community mostly antisocial people because of the nature of their work? Is there a way to balance successful video game development while still being a social person?" I have never really been a social person myself, but I enjoy talking to other people, so I wouldn't call myself an introvert, but are those kind of people really the only type of people that create all the games we enjoy and discuss today?

I believe that everybody should do what they feel they want to do and who they want to become, but I'm confused about what I personally want to do and who I want to become. I have no problems whatsoever with introverted people, but if video game development does require as much of an introverted lifestyle as I'm beginning to think it does, I don't think it's for me personally. As a young person, I'm going to start trying to be more of an understanding and social person, but I'm not sure if what I've wanted to do all my life contradicts that goal. I would love to make games, but I'm not sure I'm required to make the sacrifices it appears I may have to make.

What do you think the video game development community really is? Do you think I could find a way to balance trying to be more social while also trying to be in the video game development field? Are my conceptions about video game development and its conditions accurate? What do you say?
Post edited May 25, 2015 by Supereor
avatar
Supereor: I don't necessarily care about the opinions of other people concerning my life and what I do with it,
Good way to start the thread. Why are we here again?
Post edited May 25, 2015 by Breja
avatar
Supereor: Are my conceptions about video game development and its conditions accurate?
No. In my experience, you're completely wrong.

I only know (or have known) a handful of game devs personally. Some of them very well. All of them have been outgoing, friendly, and sociable. This includes both indies and AAA folks.

They're super happy to talk about their games and other work. They're on real-life panels and active in online discussions. Some exhibit their games at curated shows. Some run these shows. Some teach. Some are married; some have families.

None that I know are hidden away.
I think in general you would find most "programmers" (don't sugar coat it as video game programmers) end up spending a lot of time behind a monitor and keyboard, writing, re-writing and eventually producing code to do even the most menial tasks. Think about it, what does it take to write a simple game of "tic-tac-toe" and have an algorithm which has the computer go for the win?

Now let's take it a step further, you've got the skills, the ambition and the drive, so you get hired and work for a company. Well, they'll fix your little red wagon. Toss all your conventional knowledge out the door, forget about best practices and what not, because they might give you specs like "what if.....?" ask you for a realistic estimation of time to complete it and then tell you how many hours you have to do it in. (Yeah, I'm really scratching my head at that one.)

In a perfect world, programming computers would be a labor of love, *not* being a slave to the machine.
Oh, my name's Joe BTW, nice to meet you. ;)
Post edited May 25, 2015 by JDelekto
avatar
Supereor: I don't necessarily care about the opinions of other people concerning my life and what I do with it,
avatar
Breja: Good way to start the thread. Why are we here again?
I like your style Breja. +1
avatar
Supereor: I don't necessarily care about the opinions of other people concerning my life and what I do with it,
avatar
Breja: Good way to start the thread. Why are we here again?
I see what you mean. I mean I'm not one of those people who feel the need to judge the lifestyles of other people, and that I disagree with those that do. I didn't mean "I'm asking for your opinions that I don't care about." Thank you for pointing that out.
Post edited May 25, 2015 by Supereor
Don't let anyone dissuade you from what it is you want to do. It's great that you want advice from others, but you always have to take it all with a grain of salt.

I think if you put your mind to it, you could be a great programmer.
Ok, now to try and be somewhat helpful. Try being the key word.
avatar
Supereor: Do you think I could find a way to balance trying to be more social while also trying to be in the video game development field?
I have zero knowladge of game developement or programming in general, not my field at all, so this is pretty much pure speculation based on what think are reasonable assumptions- unless you end up as a one man indie studio, developing a game, even a small one, not to mention working on something major, will always be a team effort. By necessity you would have to interact with the rest of your team, like anyone who has co-workers. Possibly even closer. I don't think being overly anti-social and introvertic would be conducive for a job like that. Like with most jobs, you'd just have to hope you'll be lucky with you co-workers, and not end up working with people you hate.
Post edited May 25, 2015 by Breja