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Someone needs to tell Jmich that he needs to hone his joke telling skills. Come on "6 community members went to GOG HQ", ok, and then what?? Where's the rest of the joke, what's the story? Where's the punchline?? :P


Anyway thanks for posting about your experience!

There's just one thing I am surprised about, we're already in 13 pages on this topic and no one asked about Cyberpunk 2077?? Is there anything you guys can tell us about it that doesn't violate the NDA?
high rated
In September of 2017 six forumers disappeared in the GOG offices near Warsaw, Poland, while eating pizza and asking questions... A few weeks later their footage was found.
Attachments:
OK, so please let me get this straight.

Individuals who were prevalent, knowledgeable and seasoned in the community along with concerns and issues were invited to GOG's headquarters, asked to sign an NDA about information presented to them which is sensitive to the company itself.

Aside from any formal declaration from GOG that they were going to do this, the individuals who did receive and accept the invitation, did speak with those at the company how they should share their experience with the community and there was a green light to do so.

a) I really think that it's a great part on the company to invite those most knowledgeable in the community and perhaps the most critically inclined to get some very important feedback. I'm pretty sure those visiting shared almost the same discomfort as those waiting to hear what they had to say;
b) I think the NDA is a way to make sure that no trade secrets get out that might have been seen or overheard or perhaps even any financials that were shared. It's the typical CYA thing.
c) I like that GOG is listening --but at the same time, they're growing and changing. Still remaining DRM free and still trying to get us those good old games when they can.

I hope those who visited GOG had a great time and hopefully learned some good stuff along the way!
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Ghostfromthepast: Someone needs to tell Jmich that he needs to hone his joke telling skills. Come on "6 community members went to GOG HQ", ok, and then what?? Where's the rest of the joke, what's the story? Where's the punchline?? :P

Anyway thanks for posting about your experience!

There's just one thing I am surprised about, we're already in 13 pages on this topic and no one asked about Cyberpunk 2077?? Is there anything you guys can tell us about it that doesn't violate the NDA?
6 community members went to GOG HQ... and were never heard from again ;-p

As for Cyberpunk 2077, while they apparently toured the CDP side of the building, the people they talked with were part of GOG staff, not CDP. Even if they did ask and get some info about it, it would definitely fall under NDA.
Cyberpunk 2077 was the only thing they wouldn't talk about. We just got knowing smiles and were prompted to move on to the next question when we brought it up.

As for GOG/CDPR, we actually did tour through the CDPR areas as well. While I can't disclose a lot of what we saw, I can say one of the areas we went through was dedicated to Gwent (if anyone's interested) and we saw everything from the base coding being done to the card artwork. It was pretty interesting. Unfortunately, I can't really say much more.
Post edited October 07, 2017 by GR00T
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GR00T: Cyberpunk 2077 was the only thing they wouldn't talk about. We just got knowing smiles and were prompted to move on to the next question when we brought it up.

As for GOG/CDPR, we actually did tour through the CDPR areas as well. While I can't disclose a lot of what we saw, I can say one of the areas we went through was dedicated to Gwent (if anyone's interested) and we saw everything from the base coding being done to the card artwork. It was pretty interesting. Unfortunately, I can't really say much more.
Did you see the area where their developers work? What was it like? Cubicles or open floor? Did they have standing desks? Large and/or curved monitors? Laptops or desktops? Macs or PCs?
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GR00T: Cyberpunk 2077 was the only thing they wouldn't talk about. We just got knowing smiles and were prompted to move on to the next question when we brought it up.

As for GOG/CDPR, we actually did tour through the CDPR areas as well. While I can't disclose a lot of what we saw, I can say one of the areas we went through was dedicated to Gwent (if anyone's interested) and we saw everything from the base coding being done to the card artwork. It was pretty interesting. Unfortunately, I can't really say much more.
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Alaric.us: Did you see the area where their developers work? What was it like? Cubicles or open floor? Did they have standing desks? Large and/or curved monitors? Laptops or desktops? Macs or PCs?
Not sure how much I can say, but yes, we saw some of that as well. Lots of PCs - didn't really notice curved monitors. Not sure about Macs, but I've got to think there had to be some, since they (assumedly) test games on Macs as well. A lot of laptops around as well. It struck me that almost everyone had one of each at least (although that may be an overestimation, but there were a lot of both around). Not cubicles. They really did a nice job with their spaces and have a lot of room with a lot of glass (doors and walls), so it seems much more open than it actually is.
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Alaric.us: Did you see the area where their developers work? What was it like? Cubicles or open floor? Did they have standing desks? Large and/or curved monitors? Laptops or desktops? Macs or PCs?
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GR00T: Not sure how much I can say, but yes, we saw some of that as well. Lots of PCs - didn't really notice curved monitors. Not sure about Macs, but I've got to think there had to be some, since they (assumedly) test games on Macs as well. A lot of laptops around as well. It struck me that almost everyone had one of each at least (although that may be an overestimation, but there were a lot of both around). Not cubicles. They really did a nice job with their spaces and have a lot of room with a lot of glass (doors and walls), so it seems much more open than it actually is.
Cool! Open spaces and laptops seem to be how all the top companies are doing it these days. I wonder if they get to pick their own hardware, desks, chairs, monitors, etc. It's absolutely the best when you get to set up your own gear just the way you like it.
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Pond86: If they are recruting for it and can't do it due to that then thats fine. I'd imagine its no easy task, would just be nice to know if they are working on games like Blood 2, so its not just sitting there in my library saying "Ha, ha, you brought me and can't play me cause your on Windows 10!"
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Thiev: We do plan on going back to games released (on GOG) pre-Win10 in terms of compatibility. But the amount of 'fresh' releases keeps pushing that project further down the line :(
Thiev Could you guys please do something about making the ENGLISH VERSION Alone in the dark 4: The New Nightmare compatible with win 10?

Like get in touch with the devs and get them to REMAKE the EXECUTABLE for it!
Post edited October 07, 2017 by fr33kSh0w2012
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tinyE: did we ever figure out what NDA was?
It's called a ***NON DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT***
MarkoH01 already answered you, but let me add a couple of things.
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lazydog: Naivity is another, this can be quickly resolved: Where is the resolution? Is their a resolution or is this NDA territory?
See point 4. They do have plans to add a default installer option, so that is one thing they'll deal with. They did also bring members of the community in to discuss potential changes, so they do seem to be doing a bit of discussing before making any other changes.

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lazydog: Complications: Let GOG come here and say first hand that they wish to drop a core principle because it is too complicated.
They didn't add regional pricing because it was complicated. They added regional pricing so they could continue to grow. The reasons for the current regional prices are complicated, and one can't say "Game X is priced this way, so game Y should also be priced that way".

Feel free to ask for more clarifications.
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Djaron: well, sorry to say that, but i already reached such a point with last few "off limit" moves from GOG, that now no NDA-shielded damage-control PR operation will change things from my side. Some reasons to my feeling are still in place and seem not to be solvable anytime soon.
Perfectly understandable. We are not telling you that you should trust GOG explicitly now, nor are we telling you that everything will be fixed tomorrow. We are just saying that they did give us explanations for quite a few of their blunders.

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Djaron: But lets face it, how can someone expect to clean up and improve relation with its community/customer base through transparency yet at same time shielding some other obvious required disclosures behind an NDA.
What would you consider required disclosures? Unlikely we can disclose them, but we could ask and get clarifications.

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Djaron: Basically it's like phoning someone just to tell him you dont want to talk with him !
I saw it more like confessing and then getting the priest to explain your actions to the one you hurt. The priest does know the full story, but he's still not allowed to tell everything. You still don't want anything to do with the one confessing, but you may listen to someone else who knows the full story. Doesn't mean you'll be convinced of course.

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Djaron: I will wait for actual actions and transparency to really be in effect.
Same thing we do. We got promises, now we are also waiting for them to keep them.
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Ghostfromthepast: Someone needs to tell Jmich that he needs to hone his joke telling skills. Come on "6 community members went to GOG HQ", ok, and then what?? Where's the rest of the joke, what's the story? Where's the punchline?? :P
Blame the rest of the guys. Best we could do was "and they came back with all 12 kidneys still attached", which didn't sound all that funny.
Post edited October 07, 2017 by JMich
Thanks for the information guys :D
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Smannesman: Inviting a couple of pro-GOG forum people in secret, feed them some platitudes and non-information in order to basically do nothing.
I don't know about the others since their names are not known, but to me JMich has never really appeared "pro-GOG", but quite neutral overall. (And yes I say this from my mostly pro-GOG stance, I don't hide it that GOG is my favorite digital gaming store at the moment, So yeah you can call me pro-GOG, even if I oppose the idea of adding full Galaxy installers to offline game installers.).

I'm glad he was invited because he is active and seems to have picked up lots of information about GOG (he actively uses or knows about different GOG related tools like Galaxy, gogrepo, Essentials etc.) and seem to know quite widely of issues in GOG.

EDIT: Reading further, ok now I know some other names besides JMich. :)
Post edited October 07, 2017 by timppu
Question: How burdensome is it for GOG staff to create and update the offline installers? How much of it is automated, does it include lots of manual work etc.? Don't they see this as a problem, as they keep growing and having more and more games?

In my mind that has been the potential reason why in the longer term they might want to find some other way, even if they now say the separate installers are not going anywhere. Something where they have to do it all only once when releasing/updating a game, and it could be mostly be performed by the game developer/publisher.

For instance, the games that Galaxy downloads and installs would come as a zip file (including scripts that take care of registry settings etc. when you run the game the first time), which is the "installer" that you could back up, if you so wish. This is a similar approach what e.g. Humble Bundle uses with their DRM-free Android games, ie. even if you use their Android client to download and install a game, the client merely downloads an .apk file which the client then installs on your system. Those apk files still remain on your device so you can back then up if you wish, and later re-install a game with them (even without a client).
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JMich: A few weeks ago, some forum members received an e-mail invitation for a “one of a kind community event” in Warsaw. The reason for the invitation was that GOG wants to improve communications with the community.
A question, JMich! Due to me being too ass-lazy to read through the last 14 pages, I hope this hasn't been asked.

And that is, do you have any sharable answers as to why some developers refuse to submit patches to GOG (even though the patches have nothing to with steamworks, and are important bug fixes and updates), what does GOG do about it (do they ever call these devs up to push them on this?) and will GOG ever dare to manually grab patches from the steam version and custom update the GOG installers?
Post edited October 07, 2017 by Nicole28