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A full decade has passed since the premiere of the second game developed by CD PROJEKT RED. Despite its long presence in our game libraries, The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings can still surprise you in many ways. Here is a list of 10 things you might not have heard about this outstanding title.

1) The intro to the game was directed by Tomasz Bagiński, the Academy Award nominee for the animated short film titled The Cathedral in 2002. Lately, Bagiński is also known for being an executive producer of two Netflix series – The Witcher and Into the Night.



2) You can import your saved game from The Witcher while starting to play the game’s sequel. This will not only bring to The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings some of the items you gathered in the previous game, but also affect the reactions of a few NPCs to your character as the story progresses.

3) It was the first game ever to use REDengine, moreover, this software was specially tailored for the game. The engine’s developers were aided in their work by members of other studio departments, like designers, a fact that greatly aided the beauty and complexity of the world shown in The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings.

4) While developing characters present in the game, special attention was given to their heads – over 100 models of them were created. Designers who worked on this task for The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings were aided by a professional sculptor.



5) In the town of Lobinden you might meet a character by the name of Anezka with a face that might seem familiar. That’s because Didi Cardoso, the editor-in-chief of Gamer's Intuition and a long-time contributor to The Witcher community forum, has lent her appearance to this character.

6) The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings has a few hidden easter eggs that will be appreciated by pop culture buffs. For example, while exploring the dungeon at the beginning of the game you might overhear an escape plan quite similar to the one from the Prison Break series. Also, during the siege of La Valette Castle, pay special attention to the iron gate’s surroundings – you might spot a reference to the first Assassin’s Creed game. Finally, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings trilogy is quoted or paraphrased at least a few times in the game, so stay vigilant!

7) The whole 43-track version of the OST from The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings is available for free download on the CD PROJEKT RED website. The grim, yet energetic score by Adam Skorupa and Krzysztof Wierzynkiewicz was essential in creating the game’s unique atmosphere.



8) In The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings the player can progress up to 35. level of experience. Yet even while training and hunting for monsters you have to remember that Geralt of Rivia can also earn so-called passive abilities that are connected strictly to particular moments of the game's story.

9) Geralt of Rivia is voiced by Doug Cockle, the actor that lent his voice to the famous Witcher in all three parts of the game trilogy. We can also hear his voice in quite a few other video games such as The Book of Unwritten Tales or Terminator: Resistance. Cockle also played roles in some notable Hollywood blockbusters, like Reign of Fire and Captain America: The First Avenger.

10) The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings’ ending has 16 variations, each one depending heavily on decisions you’ve made along the way. Just like in all The Witcher games, there are no “good” or “bad” choices, while many of them can be considered morally ambiguous.

Of course, this is only a small part of The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings rich trivia that has accumulated over 10 years since its release. Do you have a fun fact connected to the game that you would like to share with other gamers? Let us know now in the comments!
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Time4Tea: That sounds like a really interesting mod. Makes me wish I'd known about it before I started my playthrough!
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toxicTom: Well, downside is, you have to start over. It changes so much, vanilla save games are not compatible.
Ok. Yeah, given how far I've played already I'm not going to start over, so I'll just finish the vanilla. Still, good to know for future reference and it's good to hear the combat is improved in W3. All the rolling around on the floor is a bit weird/annoying. It makes sense in a game like Ninja Gaiden, but for Geralt ... I'm not so sure.
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Time4Tea: Do you mean this quest? No, I don't think I did that one. It looks like you had to have some amulet carried over from the Prologue, which I don't think I had. Oh well :-)

Thanks for your other tips, I will make sure to do a good amount of exploring.
I apologise for the late reply, yes, Melitele's Heart is the quest I was referring to. It triggers during the prologue (if a certain condition is met) and carries over into Chapter I. Not that difficult, but certainly worthwhile. For me it wasn't so much about the reward as it was about the story behind it.

In Chapter III you will reach my favourite location in the game (and of the best overall in the series), a place where two worlds collide and contrast. I always had the feeling that this area will never truly belong to those claiming it during the events of The Witcher 2. The Epilogue only enforced that belief even further.
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patrikc: In Chapter III you will reach my favourite location in the game (and of the best overall in the series), a place where two worlds collide and contrast. I always had the feeling that this area will never truly belong to those claiming it during the events of The Witcher 2. The Epilogue only enforced that belief even further.
Ok, that sounds good. I'm still in Chapter 2 and I recently found the caves underneath the Kaedweni camp and I've been exploring through there. On the beach at the back I found a wrecked ship, which looks like it might be related to the 'Mystic River' quest from Chapter 1, although there doesn't seem to be anything there I can interact with (despite there being a chest sitting right in front of it).

Also, it looks like there is another little area of the camp with some tents behind the area where the Kaedweni nobles are. I don't seem to be able to get there though, as it's behind a big gate I can't open and from the beach side there is a barricade that I can't pass. Will I be able to access that at a later point?

It also seems that I can row out to Roche's ship, but there apparently isn't anything to do there. So, there are a few odd things around the Kaedweni camp that are puzzling me a bit atm.
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Time4Tea: Also, it looks like there is another little area of the camp with some tents behind the area where the Kaedweni nobles are. I don't seem to be able to get there though, as it's behind a big gate I can't open and from the beach side there is a barricade that I can't pass. Will I be able to access that at a later point?
Yes, you will be able to access that area at a later stage of the story.
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patrikc: Yes, you will be able to access that area at a later stage of the story.
Ok, thanks for the hint!
waiting for years for an implementation of the achievements :(
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spds100: waiting for years for an implementation of the achievements :(
Only 20 votes left to reach 1000!
https://www.gog.com/wishlist/galaxy/achievements_for_witcher_2

Let's see how much longer CD Projekt RED can ignore the will of the fans.
high rated
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Orkhepaj: does it have on steam ?
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winand: Why are people bothered about achievements? Just curious. I, for one, gets put off by the achievement notifications. Is it mostly to do with 100% completion?
I can give you my take on Achievements, but many people may find it very odd.

I absolutely hate achievements and Microsoft for inventing them. I think they ruin games. How? Here's an example:
Devs in some generic interview: We've worked hard to let players play the game in any way they wish, all paths are valid.

Also Devs: Finish the game on insane difficulty, while wearing a pink dress, using only a wrench and a particular skill tree only. If you do not, there will be this annoying progress bar telling you that you've not completed the game. Game completion is tracked not by mission number or any sort of logical in game goal, but purely on whether or not you wore that pink dress. Pray you never accidentally take it off during the game.

As a completionist, with some mild OCD, I get VERY annoyed by some stupid achievement tracker using the term "Game completion". I may have finished all optional objectives and found all secrets, etc, but I dared to not wear that pink dress. So now I'm obligated to play games that one pre-determined way, instead of the way I wish. Achievements have turned games into a secondary job, instead of entertainment.

I respect Studios like Telltale games where all achievements are simply chapter counters or something like that. If you actually beat the game, you will be done. If I was a game developer, I would make a game with a single achievement awarded for clicking "New Game", just to mock this concept.

Now I realise that a part of this hatred is my own fault, for not being able to ignore these stupid trackers, but I feel true freedom and relief whenever I play some old PC game that does not have them.
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SargonAelther: I can give you my take on Achievements, but many people may find it very odd.

I absolutely hate achievements and Microsoft for inventing them. I think they ruin games.
Very much agree. Achievements suck. One of the very, very (VERY!) many benefits to not using GOG's bloatware is that I don't have those blasted achievements in any of the Witcher games (and probably many others). They are usually badly done, stears people into this, that and the other direction, and the game becomes more about ticking boxes than actually playing the darn game. The world was a better place before that curse was invented. And of course other curses too, like gambling boxes, micro transactions, and all the other BS gaming companies come up with to lure more money out of easily fooled (or too young to know) consumers.
I just dont care about acheivements. If tbeyre good and the game itself is really good it can be a fun way to add replay value as long as theyre not too insane. I guess its different for someone who played for decades before they existed, so I can understand a person that always had them available missing them.

In this case its not so much about the acheivements themselves as it is about the game missing a feature on the devs own platform that is available on others. Youd think you would get more for supporting their platform, or at least not be missing features.