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dtgreene: The idea is that you decide when to turn on the script. The script doesn't care about whether you are in combat, but instead checks to see if buffs are active and re-casts them if necessary. Alternatively, you can set it to activate when you press a key.
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Hickory: That's what spell triggers/sequencers/contingencies and are for. Using a script for such a thing is just silly.
There is a big difference here.

A spell trigger, spell sequencer, or contingency is a special ability that lets you do something you could not do normally.

A (fair) script simply automates something you could do normally.

So yes, there is a difference.

(It's also worth noting that enemies are not capable of using such spells. Therefore, the developers had to fake it with scripts; this involves displaying a message (like Spell Sequencer) activated (to make it look like the enemy is using it) and then using ReallyForceSpell to cast all the spells involved. (The script may have a clause that prevents this from triggering more than once on the same enemy.)
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Hickory: That's what spell triggers/sequencers/contingencies and are for. Using a script for such a thing is just silly.
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dtgreene: There is a big difference here.

A spell trigger, spell sequencer, or contingency is a special ability that lets you do something you could not do normally.

A (fair) script simply automates something you could do normally.

So yes, there is a difference.

(It's also worth noting that enemies are not capable of using such spells. Therefore, the developers had to fake it with scripts; this involves displaying a message (like Spell Sequencer) activated (to make it look like the enemy is using it) and then using ReallyForceSpell to cast all the spells involved. (The script may have a clause that prevents this from triggering more than once on the same enemy.)
No, there is not a difference. A trigger/sequencer/contingency is JUST a script, nothing more.
Are you two getting the words script and macro confused?
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vsommers12: Are you two getting the words script and macro confused?
Ok, let me be clearer: a spell trigger/sequencer is 'effectively' a script. That is to say a script is a linear sequence of commands. A trigger/sequencer is granted as an innate ability that has the 'remembered' spells associated with it. When activated, those spells are fired off in the manner of a script, one after the other instantaneously. Granted, they are not compiled 'BCS' scripts, but they are fired by the same principle/language. To assign a script (.bcs) to do the same thing has only the advantage of 'cheating', by overpopulation and overuse.
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vsommers12: Are you two getting the words script and macro confused?
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Hickory: Ok, let me be clearer: a spell trigger/sequencer is 'effectively' a script. That is to say a script is a linear sequence of commands. A trigger/sequencer is granted as an innate ability that has the 'remembered' spells associated with it. When activated, those spells are fired off in the manner of a script, one after the other instantaneously. Granted, they are not compiled 'BCS' scripts, but they are fired by the same principle/language. To assign a script (.bcs) to do the same thing has only the advantage of 'cheating', by overpopulation and overuse.
I wouldn't consider a bcs AI script to be cheating if it doesn't use any of the cheating commands. In particular, if you use CastSpell to cast the spells, your character will cast the spell using the normal rules; that is not cheating. You have the normal casting time, the possibility of being disrupted, you have to have the spell memorized, and the spell does get used up.
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dtgreene: I wouldn't consider a bcs AI script to be cheating if it doesn't use any of the cheating commands.
I said it only has the 'advantage' of cheating. Buffing is an in-game activity that is supposed to be performed by the player, not by a script. To dedicate a script to do such a mundane task it to invite 'liberties' -- anybody who can't be bothered to do it normally is not going to think twice.
The advantage to such a script is to save time, not to cheat - at least that would have been my intention. Looked into it briefly, but the language is a PITA, so I can't be bothered to do this. Will have to live with buffing all of the usual spells before important battles. Click-click-click-wait... click-click-click-wait... ad inf.