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Couldn't find an answer to this so I'm asking for an 'Official' response (or a response from a 'well informed' fellow user). I'm sure a huge amount of votes on the 'Wishlist' counts for a lot (you *do* want to make some money), but what are some of the reasons for a game being in the 'top 10' of the wishlist for example, but not being released for d/l by you guys? What kind of grief and negotiations do you go thru with the companies involved? You know, like why does System Shock have 3192 votes, but we get 'Duke Nukem'? *Not complaining* - just curious what some of the stumbling blocks are. It would be interesting to know. Thanks.
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They have to speak with the copyright holders and work out a deal. Some games are easy, others are overly hard for various reasons (like not being able to find/contact the copyright holder, or the holder doesn't want to make a deal).
I don't know about System Shock 2 though, it's owned by EA, it shouldn't be too hard. I'd like to know too.
Post edited February 27, 2009 by TheCombine
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TheCombine: They have to speak with the copyright holders and work out a deal. Some games are easy, others are overly hard for various reasons (like not being able to find/contact the copyright holder, or the holder doesn't want to make a deal).
I don't know about System Shock 2 though, it's owned by EA, it shouldn't be too hard. I'd like to know too.

Thanks. Actually, I'm more interested in SS1. I could never get that one to work correctly. SS2 I *could* get to work, but you have to jump thru a hoop or 2 to do it. I played it thru twice and would love to play SS1. Or ***Outcast*** (Please!). Anyway, thanks for responding. I'd also like to hear from someone 'official', too...
BTW, SS2 has a site: TTLG.COM that will help you get it to work. Not sure about Vista, but on my old XP - success! One of the greatest games I've ever played...
Thanks again.
EA likes its DRM, GOG doesn't. That's a big sticking point on System Shock 2.
The wishlist is kind of like a "suggestion box" for games that GOG might want to go after, but like TheCombine said, just because it is really wanted, doesn't mean GOG can actually get it. As GOG improves, expands and is successful, that should become easier to do, since they will be able to show publishers and rights holders that they really can make money off of their old libraries. At least it will become easier to do with those games where there is a clear rights holder to negotiate with.
Some companies, like Interplay, are barely alive. So it's only natural and it benefits both GOG and Interplay to get their games out to make some moolah and drum up hype for their new games (Fallout MMO?). Others, like Epic sell their old games here as well as on Steam to entice players to think, "Hmm, I bought Unreal Gold and I like it, maybe I'll buy their newer games too."
Of course, GOG has to approach them, and initiate dialog with the publishers to see if they are willing to sell their games on their digital storefront. It isn't easy, after all in this piracy-laced world that is fighting a virtual arms race against DRM, it's very risky to sell games here DRM-free.
Most of the games on GOG will have at least broken even by now, and many were quite profitable. Any possible impact piracy could have on sales has already happened; with a growing number of people opposed to DRM, offering DRM-free classics at low prices is guaranteed to bring in customers, and the negligible reproduction costs of digital distribution means a GOG release could be profitable even if it might have only mediocre sales.
To start selling a new game GOG has to track down anyone and everyone who holds the copyrights and relevant distribution rights to the game. For some games this can end up being a royal mess, with multiple rights holders, some of which can be difficult to track down and contact. GOG then has to negotiate a distribution agreement that's acceptable to all of these people, and in some cases one of the parties involved simply won't want to sign on with GOG (whether it be over DRM issues, control issues, or simply being wankers). It'll ultimately be a slow process (although hopefully one that becomes easier over time) of continuing to track down and contact the necessary people and convince them that GOG is a viable and profitable business model for them to get in on. We just have to be patient and let the folks at GOG do their thing.
Now that apogee are on board, it'll hopefully help build some more momentum, each new developer will assist in giving the impression that GOG is a good business model and one of these days one of the really big companies may well realise that selling things, even old things, is better than not selling things.
Post edited February 28, 2009 by Aliasalpha
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Aliasalpha: Now that apogee are on board, it'll hopefully help build some more momentum, each new developer will assist in giving the impression that GOG is a good business model and one of these days one of the really big companies may well realise that selling things, even old things, is better than not selling things.

I still think that we won't see much of a change and GOG won't become amazingly popular until more of the big guys come, with EA, Microsoft Games, and other companies. Apogee is a start, but that's all it is: a start.
Maybe they decide under cocaine effect? :-D
Seriously, I think this is a particular sensitive question so I'm very much dubious about the fact the GOG team will ever spend a word about it....
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Aliasalpha: Now that apogee are on board, it'll hopefully help build some more momentum, each new developer will assist in giving the impression that GOG is a good business model and one of these days one of the really big companies may well realise that selling things, even old things, is better than not selling things.
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michaelleung: I still think that we won't see much of a change and GOG won't become amazingly popular until more of the big guys come, with EA, Microsoft Games, and other companies. Apogee is a start, but that's all it is: a start.

EA would make gog a superpower. That or buy them out to kill competition
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michaelleung: I still think that we won't see much of a change and GOG won't become amazingly popular until more of the big guys come, with EA, Microsoft Games, and other companies. Apogee is a start, but that's all it is: a start.

I doubt MS will be joining.
I think they would rather release old games 1 of their live platforms.
Post edited February 28, 2009 by HertogJan
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cogadh: EA likes its DRM, GOG doesn't. That's a big sticking point on System Shock 2.

Well, to be fair, we don't know that. We know that EA use DRM on their new games, but so do most companies here. There are several companies on GoG who have been known to use Starforce and Securom on their releases (not that I hold that against them, I'm pretty fed up with the the anti-DRM hysteria to be honest, I'm just pointing it out). So the fact that EA use DRM-solutions on their new releases doesn't have to be relevant here.
My guess, though it is only a guess, is that EA know their back catalogue is worth tons of money, and they're not yet convinced that they should "turn it over" to GoG. They have traditionally been very keen on maintaining control over their IP and products - they did not like Xbox Live to begin with, they wanted their own digital distribution platform instead of using existing ones like Steam, et.c. So basically, I think GoG will have to really prove itself before they will consider it.
from what I understand they release new games based on the habits of a groundhog.
Also I've gotten the impression over the years that they always seem on the cusp of comitting to re-launching an old IP & don't want the old ones around to distract from potential sales. Of course they never DO re-launch them and so they sit forever.
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Weclock: from what I understand they release new games based on the habits of a groundhog.

Nah thats how they greenlight new IP projects
Post edited February 28, 2009 by Aliasalpha