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In the event GOG has to honor a system of the consumer being able to trade/sell a copy, they can make it to where the executable erases itself after installation. Sort of like how adobe flash updates install (they disappear off your desktop once the executable is initiated). So when you go to trade or sell the game off to someone else, you lose your ability to install the game on any further machines. It would be a bit of a backpedal on the DRM stance but it's the least obtrusive way of doing things.
Post edited February 03, 2014 by Trajhenkhetlive
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Trajhenkhetlive: In the event GOG has to honor a system of the consumer being able to trade/sell a copy, they can make it to where the executable erases itself after installation. Sort of like how adobe flash updates install (they disappear off your desktop once the executable is initiated). So when you go to trade or sell the game off to someone else, you lose your ability to install the game on any further machines. It would be a bit of a backpedal on the DRM stance but it's the least obtrusive way of doing things.
So, every time I want to reinstall a game on my 'Puter I'd need to re-download it?

If that's the case, IMHO It would only cause issues with an apparent easy "circumvention"

1 ) download installer
2 ) copy to "archival" location (external HD,usb Flash drive)
3 ) every time re-installation is in order copy the "archival" copy to a different location & have the new copy self-destruct
Wouldn't the least intrusive way be to sell the game and have it removed from your game shelf and appear on the shelf of whoever purchased it? Yes, technically speaking you could download the game and then sell it, but technically speaking you could also just pirate it. At some level the shop has to take something on faith. Otherwise we end up with that always online nonsense.
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Melhelix: Wouldn't the least intrusive way be to sell the game and have it removed from your game shelf and appear on the shelf of whoever purchased it? Yes, technically speaking you could download the game and then sell it, but technically speaking you could also just pirate it. At some level the shop has to take something on faith. Otherwise we end up with that always online nonsense.
I like your "convert to gift" idea.
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Melhelix: Wouldn't the least intrusive way be to sell the game and have it removed from your game shelf and appear on the shelf of whoever purchased it? Yes, technically speaking you could download the game and then sell it, but technically speaking you could also just pirate it. At some level the shop has to take something on faith. Otherwise we end up with that always online nonsense.
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Rusty_Gunn: I like your "convert to gift" idea.
I concur. "this way I can get games that were removed ;D"
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Trajhenkhetlive: It would be a bit of a backpedal on the DRM stance but it's the least obtrusive way of doing things.
If GOG 'backpedals' on DRM then count me as a from-then-on non-customer. I'll take my 300 games "shelf" and go home! :) /jk

Actually, GOG does have DRM in a sense. For example, I've only DL'd maybe 50 of those 300+ games.

If GOG were to close tomorrow, I could "lose" (access to) over 250 games that I have purchased.

The "cloud storage" of my games on my GOG "shelf" is itself a sort of DRM. I.e.; one should DL their games "now" because you might not be able to tomorrow. I've been trusting GOG not to "close tomorrow". But it could happen and if it did it would really suck.

But for me that's a way-less intrusive DRM than that of Steam (on which I've only purchased 1 or 2 games - because DRM).

(As an aside; I do wish I could flag games on my shelf for burning to DVD or even blu-ray and subsequent mailing to me (for some modest "reasonable" cost ofc))
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Martek: <snipped>
I did make a point to dl all that I have bought & I have even when it took a few days.

I don't see the GOG cloud as a DRM as it doesn't restrict your access to what you paid for (unless you mean if you try to see the shelf without being logged in)
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Trajhenkhetlive: It would be a bit of a backpedal on the DRM stance but it's the least obtrusive way of doing things.
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Martek: If GOG 'backpedals' on DRM then count me as a from-then-on non-customer. I'll take my 300 games "shelf" and go home! :) /jk

Actually, GOG does have DRM in a sense. For example, I've only DL'd maybe 50 of those 300+ games.

If GOG were to close tomorrow, I could "lose" (access to) over 250 games that I have purchased.

The "cloud storage" of my games on my GOG "shelf" is itself a sort of DRM. I.e.; one should DL their games "now" because you might not be able to tomorrow. I've been trusting GOG not to "close tomorrow". But it could happen and if it did it would really suck.

But for me that's a way-less intrusive DRM than that of Steam (on which I've only purchased 1 or 2 games - because DRM).

(As an aside; I do wish I could flag games on my shelf for burning to DVD or even blu-ray and subsequent mailing to me (for some modest "reasonable" cost ofc))
Exactly. And GOG also reserves the right to remove your access to your purchased titles as well, which is a de facto DRM.
Honestly i don't understand why this is still ongoing. Physical stuff u can touch and see you can resell, courts ought to just stick 'virtual goods " of any description as an exception altogether. Because there is NO central virtual system inplace, there is no real way to be able to trade a virtual product to anyone. At least thats how i understand it.
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anjohl: Exactly. And GOG also reserves the right to remove your access to your purchased titles as well, which is a de facto DRM.
Wrong. Unless you want to say that the shop that you bought your disc from is DRM as well.

Once you've downloaded your game, like discs, it's up to you to keep it safe. The ability to redownload it is a convenience, nothing more.

Unfortunately, people seem to be ridiculously lazy when it comes to taking care of their stuff and always expect everyone else to do it for them. In fact, many active proponents of digital distribution keep pointing at how discs get scratched and lost, and yet it only ever seems to happen to people with no ability to take care of their stuff (or keep their kids under control and teach them some basic discipline).
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anjohl: Exactly. And GOG also reserves the right to remove your access to your purchased titles as well, which is a de facto DRM.
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jamyskis: Wrong. Unless you want to say that the shop that you bought your disc from is DRM as well.

Once you've downloaded your game, like discs, it's up to you to keep it safe. The ability to redownload it is a convenience, nothing more.

Unfortunately, people seem to be ridiculously lazy when it comes to taking care of their stuff and always expect everyone else to do it for them. In fact, many active proponents of digital distribution keep pointing at how discs get scratched and lost, and yet it only ever seems to happen to people with no ability to take care of their stuff (or keep their kids under control and teach them some basic discipline).
Incorrect. A store cannot come and take the game back. Once it's purchased, you have it forever. In this case, purchased games that have yet to be opened can be taken back at will without refund by the retailer. Don't get yourselves, GOG is DRM lite, not DRM free.
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jamyskis: Wrong. Unless you want to say that the shop that you bought your disc from is DRM as well.

Once you've downloaded your game, like discs, it's up to you to keep it safe. The ability to redownload it is a convenience, nothing more.

Unfortunately, people seem to be ridiculously lazy when it comes to taking care of their stuff and always expect everyone else to do it for them. In fact, many active proponents of digital distribution keep pointing at how discs get scratched and lost, and yet it only ever seems to happen to people with no ability to take care of their stuff (or keep their kids under control and teach them some basic discipline).
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anjohl: Incorrect. A store cannot come and take the game back. Once it's purchased, you have it forever. In this case, purchased games that have yet to be opened can be taken back at will without refund by the retailer. Don't get yourselves, GOG is DRM lite, not DRM free.
Exactly, what if you never downloaded the game, and 'NEW' is still on some games in your game list.
If you don't download your games, it's more akin to buying a physical copy at a store but never going over to pick it up. If the store goes out business in the meantime, then yeah you lose your game.
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anjohl: Incorrect. A store cannot come and take the game back. Once it's purchased, you have it forever. In this case, purchased games that have yet to be opened can be taken back at will without refund by the retailer. Don't get yourselves, GOG is DRM lite, not DRM free.
They can also be taken back "unopened" to GOG. And GOG cannot remotely delete or disable your game once on your hard disk.

You're confusing download access with ownership of a game. Your possession of that "licence" is not contingent upon its appearance in your download list.
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stressthesky: If you don't download your games, it's more akin to buying a physical copy at a store but never going over to pick it up. If the store goes out business in the meantime, then yeah you lose your game.
Precisely.
Post edited February 06, 2014 by jamyskis
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stressthesky: If you don't download your games, it's more akin to buying a physical copy at a store but never going over to pick it up. If the store goes out business in the meantime, then yeah you lose your game.
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jamyskis: Precisely.
Not precisely. Storing your games was never part of my physical store purchases, while for Digital stores, digital storage really is part of the package when you buy a game. It's one of the reasons many people are fond of getting a digital backup despite already having physical copies.