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Trilarion: NO NEED TO WRITE IN CAPITAL LETTERS! Okay maybe they did, but I don't. For me it's not the point of resale. It's more freedom and minimizing the risk of buying a bad game and having more competition. I expect to pay the same on average. If you reduce resale to lower prices than of course you'll end up with your conclusions. How did the normal economy ever manage or the games industry before digital downloads. Hard to imagine.
I won't be repeating myself on differences of seconDary markets fir physical goods and digital.

But I don't understand your reasoning. You say you want to lower risk of having bad game in your library by being alright with higher game prices?
What about people wo don't resale.... They will lose money because you don't want bad game in your library. Where is the logic in that.....
It reminds me of all those OCD acdc guys whining that they got free game they did not want.
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Pheace: ...When is the last time you sold a GOG game? (Not a gift key)
Wouldn't it be illegal?

In case you meant physical copies or retail games: Well I estimate I sold about 30 games in my life but the last one might be some years ago. Still I don't want to miss this. :)
Post edited February 04, 2013 by Trilarion
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Pheace: ...When is the last time you sold a GOG game? (Not a gift key)
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Trilarion: Wouldn't it be illegal?

In case you meant physical copies or retail games: Well I estimate I sold about 30 games in my life but the last one might be some years ago. Still I don't want to miss this. :)
I'd think so yeah, but I don't see any GOG examples coming up in this thread, which is strange, as GOG doesn't allow resale either as far as I know, nor enables it by moving it from account to account. Sure, it's possible to sell your DRM-free 'copy' I guess, but who would buy that? I doubt anyone considers there's any value to it. Which means the moment you buy at GOG you basically gave up your resale just like anywhere else. (digitally)
Post edited February 04, 2013 by Pheace
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Trilarion: Wouldn't it be illegal?

In case you meant physical copies or retail games: Well I estimate I sold about 30 games in my life but the last one might be some years ago. Still I don't want to miss this. :)
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Pheace: I'd think so yeah, but I don't see any GOG examples coming up in this thread, which is strange, as GOG doesn't allow resale either as far as I know, nor enables it by moving it from account to account. Sure, it's possible to sell your DRM-free 'copy' I guess, but who would buy that? I doubt anyone considers there's any value to it. Which means the moment you buy at GOG you basically gave up your resale just like anywhere else. (digitally)
Yeah but if they allow resale gog will have to allow people to transfer games, they would not need to facilitate the sale but they would have to allow for me for example to give you access to the game I purchased by form of a key.
It could be technically done with gog codes. Each code can be activated and previous activation becomes invalid

Potential to abuse: extremely high.
True, but as it is, it's not possible as far as I'm aware, yet I'm not seeing anyone call GOG 'Anti-consumerist', even though they share the same "flaw" of not allowing/facilitating resale.
Post edited February 04, 2013 by Pheace
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Pheace: True, but as it is, it's not possible as far as I'm aware, yet I'm not seeing anyone call GOG 'Anti-consumerist', even though they share the same "flaw" of not allowing/facilitating resale.
Valve made themselves a target by locking people out of their games unless they accepted a new EULA. When they did that and got complaints, the organization took notice of the no resell aspect and decided to go after it also.
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Fictionvision: Valve made themselves a target by locking people out of their games unless they accepted a new EULA. When they did that and got complaints, the organization took notice of the no resell aspect and decided to go after it also.
I'm aware of what happened. I'm talking about people in this thread.

Besides, GOG reserved the right to make any changes in their TOU just as well, and the moment you continue to use the GOG service (website/Downloads etc) you are consenting to them. The only real difference there is that Steam actually made you aware of it and threw it in your face that if you continued to use the service you were consenting, where as far as GOG is concerned, if you keep using the site, then you automatically consented to the changes, but the end result is the same. The only way to continue using the service is to consent.

Naturally the no-DRM makes one harsher than the other but they're both doing the same thing.
Post edited February 04, 2013 by Pheace
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Pheace: ... I'd think so yeah, but I don't see any GOG examples coming up in this thread, which is strange...
It's just not allowed since the EULA speaks of a non-transferable exclusive license. So nobody wants to admit doing something illegal even if they do. It's like asking people to admit doing piracy or other crimes. Anyway what people here want is legal reselling.

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Pheace: ...Besides, GOG reserved the right to make any changes in their TOU...
Yes, that's quite common although not very friendly but at least they can never take away your games... which aren't your games anyway. Hmmm.
Post edited February 04, 2013 by Trilarion
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anjohl: I sell the CD key, you download the game, and play it. It works the same way as with DRM, just relying on the honesty of the seller to delete his copy. You know, that same honor system that allows all digital content to be sold.
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AndrewC: Ahahaha, can't stop laughing. Thanks man, you made my day.

If you think any corporation is going to rely on "honesty" and "the honor system" I want to drink/eat/snort what you're having.
Lofl, all corporations dealing in digital content rely on the honor system.
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AndrewC: Ahahaha, can't stop laughing. Thanks man, you made my day.

If you think any corporation is going to rely on "honesty" and "the honor system" I want to drink/eat/snort what you're having.
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anjohl: Lofl, all corporations dealing in digital content rely on the honor system.
lololo

no mate. they rely on providing better system than pirate bay. not honor. don't be ridiculous and naive.
Post edited February 04, 2013 by lukaszthegreat
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anjohl: Lofl, all corporations dealing in digital content rely on the honor system.
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lukaszthegreat: lololo

no mate. they rely on providing better system than pirate bay. not honor. don't be ridiculous and naive.
So if I can download an album on itunes after fumbling through their draconian payment screen just as fast as I can torrent it, what the fuck else would describe users choosing the latter other than the honor system?

And if you are going to insult me, I have no interest in discussing this or anything else with you. Kindly fuck off.
Damn, gog, you deleted my post? How lame.
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lukaszthegreat: lololo

no mate. they rely on providing better system than pirate bay. not honor. don't be ridiculous and naive.
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anjohl: So if I can download an album on itunes after fumbling through their draconian payment screen just as fast as I can torrent it, what the fuck else would describe users choosing the latter other than the honor system?

And if you are going to insult me, I have no interest in discussing this or anything else with you. Kindly fuck off.
I'm sorry but you are not the average user.

For the average user it's much more easy and fast to buy something off of iTunes than it is to download uTorrent, set it up, find a tracker, risk not getting what they want (or worse, getting some malware on their system), and then getting a letter from their ISP/court house letting them know that they're being sued for downloading copyrighted material.

Not to mention how more complicated things get for games: how many regular users know how to deal with an ISO? How many of them do you think even consider to look in there after mounting it (mount it? What's that? How do you do that?) for a crack, or even how many read the text telling them where to put that crack? Or what if the game is that new that there isn't a crack out there yet, and they just download the original image but can't play it?
Post edited February 05, 2013 by AndrewC
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Pheace: When is the last time you sold a GOG game? (Not a gift key)
That would be the last time that I sold a Steam game. And believe me, I had games on Steam that I bought and regretted in hindsight, and would just love to get rid of. GOG is a unique case in that many of the games people buy here are games that people already knew. With Steam, Gamersgate, Origin, there is a much greater risk involved in terms of quality.

And I love the way you're trying to make people out to be hypocrites even though it's blatantly obvious that Steam is nothing more than the first 'test' case in this regard. The focus is on Steam simply because it establishes a legal precedent as the company with the largest market share. Whatever principles are held to be true for Steam also hold true to GOG, Gamersgate, GMG, Origin etc. Please don't treat people like idiots in the midst of your religious fervour.

Besides, I think it should be fairly obvious that we're not really talking about selling 3, 4, 5 dollar games. For the vast majority of people, selling such games is really not worth the hassle. There's the practicality of the matter. Why spend ages trying to flog a used licence for a measly 2-3 dollars? For that matter, why bother spending time trying to find a used licence to save a dollar when you can get a 'new' one from the original provider?

No, allowing used sales is primarily about two things. Firstly, it's about keeping out-of-print media in circulation. At it stands, when a game is pulled from circulation (and there have been plenty), there is then absolutely no way to acquire such a game legally. Secondly, it's about discouraging poor quality media with the threat of resale. Good games are less likely to be placed on the used market, meaning that more people buy new. Poor or exploitative games are sold more quickly.
Post edited February 05, 2013 by jamyskis
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Trilarion: Yes, that's quite common although not very friendly but at least they can never take away your games... which aren't your games anyway. Hmmm.
GoG can remove games from your shelf, if they are forced to by producer/distributor. So far they have not needed to do so (neither have steam, I think, I got a couple on my list no longer being sold, same as here) as the distributors have all agreed that they can host games sold even though it is removed from the catalogue. However - it do not change that fact that the option is there. If you have not backed up your game, then yes, Gog can take away your games also.

Steam can just enforce it much stronger then gOg