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ET3D: True PC gaming is popping the disc in the drive, finding the installation program, running it, configuring
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Cormoran: I'll go one further, true PC gaming is getting your game in the form of large spiral-bound books filled with code that you'd then have to spend hours copying to your computer line for line, troubleshooting typos from both yourself and the book once you're done.
Would you like to see the Gothic 1 notebook I just started? That in game journal is SHIT!
Post edited February 24, 2013 by tinyE
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jamyskis: Unfortunately, there is a sizable portion of people who [...] would like the opportunity to resell their games (or buy used, possibly out-of-print ones).
Doubt there's many GOG users like that considering there's no resale value on GOG games either.
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Pheace: Doubt there's many GOG users like that considering there's no resale value on GOG games either.
I'm not (only) talking about digitally-distributed games. I'm mainly talking about the boxed variety.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by jamyskis
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jamyskis: Unfortunately, there is a sizable portion of people who [...] would like the opportunity to resell their games (or buy used, possibly out-of-print ones).
Doubt there's many GOG users like that considering there's no resale value on GOG games either.

Also the "it's not a simple process for everyone". Sure, some people have issues. Other's don't. Some people have RRD's on their consoles and have to send it back for the 3rd or 4th time. Other's don't. It's not like consoles are exempt from this.


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jamyskis: I'm not (only) talking about digitally-distributed games. I'm mainly talking about the boxed variety.
And I'm saying that both the Steam and GOG population probably don't consider that a significant factor at all. Sure, some whine and gripe about it but the fact that they buy on either service makes clear it's not a real big issue.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by Pheace
Those are good reasons, but I mainly love it for the fantastic deals. Gaming has never been this affordable before. Ease of use is a bonus. The client is not particularly clunky either. I love the cloud saves. Yeah, it's a damn good service overall.
I likw atwam for a couple of reasons. 1 sales, 2 having most of my new games on one playform,. 3 community items such as mods for some of the games.

Dont like basically online all the tme as offline mode dosent work great. 2 its a form of drm boo.
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Darling_Jimmy: If you want a better alternative; try the Mac App Store. 3rd party DRM is not allowed so the verification process is truly invisible. Also, publishers can choose to release their products DRM-free if they don't even want FairPlay. You don't have to "get kicked in the nuts" by Amazon or Steam.
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StingingVelvet: You would really think Valve would be powerful enough by now to ban 3rd part DRM on Steam.
Ahem. Even GOG is. :)

It is simply what principles the digital store wants to uphold. I recall the quarrels that EA and Valve had before was because Valve wouldn't budge from its principle of letting 3rd parties sell the DLC for the "Steam" game, or some such shit. Valve demanded that any game sold in their store must let Steam handle the DLC sales too. Maybe someone remembers it better.

Valve could just as well have a principle that they will not sell games with 3rd party DRM, but they don't.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by timppu
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timppu: Valve could just as well have a principle that they will not sell games with 3rd party DRM, but they don't.
True, but then they'd have the same AAA title list that GOG has.
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Cormoran: I'll go one further, true PC gaming is getting your game in the form of large spiral-bound books filled with code that you'd then have to spend hours copying to your computer line for line, troubleshooting typos from both yourself and the book once you're done.
Never had that experience on the PC. It was "early home computer experience" for me. Mainly on my VIC 20 days. Later it was mostly "pop the cassette in the drive, type a load command and watch coloured stripes for several minutes".
Post edited February 24, 2013 by ET3D
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timppu: Valve could just as well have a principle that they will not sell games with 3rd party DRM, but they don't.
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ET3D: True, but then they'd have the same AAA title list that GOG has.
There are no AAA titles like Skyrim with only Steam DRM (Steamworks)? Ok then... :)

As said, they'd actually have to stand for the principles they set. It could just as well said that Valve should had never started arguing about the delivery of DLC, then there would be more EA AAA games in Steam too, like Mass Effect 3.
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timppu: As said, they'd actually have to stand for the principles they set.
Steam has set any principles at any point in time? O_o
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timppu: Ahem. Even GOG is. :)
Up until recently that wasn't exactly a difficult stance to uphold for GOG though, seeing a large amount of their games either use Dosbox or some other variant and GOG often need to rework the game anyway. There's little DRM left to speak of on the classic games that would still be anything but a bother at this point.

With the newer games I'm sure it's a bother sometimes now when they're asking for a game to be sold here. Indie games luckily don't have many issues there since they often tend to be DRM-free anyway.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by Pheace
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timppu: As said, they'd actually have to stand for the principles they set.
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Fenixp: Steam has set any principles at any point in time? O_o
Well, at least when it comes to profit. I think that is why they didn't want others handle the DLC for any games sold on Steam, giving up one of their profit channels to competitors without a fight.

Wasn't that the reason EA pulled and refused to sell some of its games in Steam anymore, because Valve didn't allow EA take care of the DLC sales?
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Fenixp: Steam has set any principles at any point in time? O_o
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timppu: Well, at least when it comes to profit. I think that is why they didn't want others handle the DLC for any games sold on Steam, giving up one of their profit channels to competitors without a fight.

Wasn't that the reason EA pulled and refused to sell some of its games in Steam anymore, because Valve didn't allow EA take care of the DLC sales?
That's what EA claims was the reason anyway. Of course a week or two after that it seems they already had an all new Origin with planned Origin exclusive titles ready to go, so the timing is suspect at best and just seems more like a convenient excuse.

Of course it makes sense that they want to keep DLC sales to themselves, they do a lot digital as well and they even had their own digital store.

As a Steam consumer though it's vastly preferable to be able to buy the DLC for the game you bought on Steam through Steam as well rather than go to Bioware and buy bioware points to be able to get the rest of the game.

For Steam profit wise it's also a lot more beneficial of course, in part just because of that, and I think more importantly it was from their move to F2P games, and the fact that more games were going the DLC route, which meant that in the long run, they could be selling new games dirtcheap through Steam, using Steam for bandwidth and support/patching, and reap the profits from the DLC sales that would follow. A business model like that simply doesn't make sense for Steam.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by Pheace
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timppu: Well, at least when it comes to profit. I think that is why they didn't want others handle the DLC for any games sold on Steam, giving up one of their profit channels to competitors without a fight.
Huh? Often, you can get DLCs from different sources (altho it will not redeem on Steam,) or just buy them for Steam directly, like Skyrim DLCs.
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timppu: Ahem. Even GOG is. :)
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Pheace: Up until recently that wasn't exactly a difficult stance to uphold for GOG though, seeing a large amount of their games either use Dosbox or some other variant and GOG often need to rework the game anyway. There's little DRM left to speak of on the classic games that would still be anything but a bother at this point.

With the newer games I'm sure it's a bother sometimes now when they're asking for a game to be sold here. Indie games luckily don't have many issues there since they often tend to be DRM-free anyway.
True, but it is a double-edged sword. If GOG started allowing third-party, or any-party, DRM, how would they differentiate themselves from e.g. GamersGate or Steam at that point? I for one must admit that at that point I personally wouldn't probably see much of a reason to buy a game from GOG instead of e.g. Steam, if it is available in both, with DRM. What would be your reason to buy such a game from GOG instead of Steam?

If GOG felt that it would make sense for them to allow third-party DRM, I'm quite sure they'd do that. After all, they even introduced an optional downloader client, even though some people opposed even it.