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Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving.

Evoland, a console-style RPG that starts off as very basic 8-bit(ish) game and evolves to become more advanced and complex as you play it, is available 10% off on GOG.com. That's only $8.99 for the first week!

What makes a console-style action-RPG? This is a concept that has been evolving immensely over the years. So, why don't we take all that defines--and used to define--this genre and put it in one game? Why don't we make the player observe the evolution of gameplay-types, ideas, and visuals, as he progresses further in the game? Why not give him or her the chance to upgrade the game itself, from within the game? Intriguing, right? Well, that's exactly what Evoland is about.

Evoland is a concept game, but unlike many other concept games it offers much more than gameplay based on a gimmick. The story that the game tells you in its unique way is alone interesting enough to make it well-worth playing. The fact that in this single game, you're getting the whole history of console-style action-RPGs in a nutshell can be treated just as a bonus feature. In the end, though, you might find that the main drive for you is to find just one more upgrade-chest and find out how it will affect the gameworld. With many aesthetics and mechanics tightly packed together, waves of nostalgia passing as you play, and a high level of polish, this original title is something you should really check out!

Get upgrading! Start with upgrading your computer with a fresh copy of Evoland, for only $8.99 on GOG.com. The discount will last until Thursday, April 11, at 10:59AM GMT.
Am I the only one who finds this game inexplicably depressing?
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GOG.com: Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving.
Now I've got that song in my head. And I don't mind. ;)
Here's a short list of the features you'll see in this game. I've played 1-2 hours so far.



> Open chests to collect new features (which are not toggled but always on), chests can also contain cards for Double Twins (based on FF8's card game) and stars (collectibles).
> Start in 16-bit uncoloured 2D, finish in high-def 3D. You'll need chests that change graphics on close-up maps, town maps and world map - that is, your close-up map might look 3D, but your world map might still be 2D.
> Close-up maps are A-RPG (first Zelda games, even when in 3D), world map is like the first Final Fantasies and contains random encounters (turn-based battle with filling gauge that dictates when your turn starts).
> Early on in the game, gain the ability to switch from new-school to old-school (3D/2D) by hitting crystals; you'll need this to solve some puzzles.
> The game is quite linear (you can't miss upgrade chests) but so are roller coasters.

Don't let the size fool you (101 MB after install); it takes 6 hours or so to complete at 100% (say the developers). Don't let the price get you down, where I live a new DVD is easily 25-30€ and it lasts three hours tops.

Only flaw I can see is: it's not really what I expected, and it's not really what you were expecting either. That's because the genre they chose (which I totally just made up) - an anthology and walk through a certain genre of video game - is very open and I think every one saw in the game what they wanted to see.

An excellent video game nonetheless.
One thing that really pissed me off was the complete lack of gamepad support. I bought the game, attached my laptop to the TV, grabbed my gamepad, fired it up, lounged out on the sofa and...found that the game supports fucking keyboard only. Yeah, cheers for that. A genre famous for its console roots and being played from a gamepad, and yet no gamepad support in sight.

And the first couple of hours have been a bit bland to be honest. I got a giggle out of some of the gags in the unlock lines, but a JRPG without any kind of real story shows you how much the genre depends on stronger narratives.

This is panning out to be one of my biggest disappointments this year so far.
Post edited April 05, 2013 by jamyskis
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DShiller: Here's a short list of the features you'll see in this game. I've played 1-2 hours so far.

> Open chests to collect new features (which are not toggled but always on), chests can also contain cards for Double Twins (based on FF8's card game) and stars (collectibles).
> Start in 16-bit uncoloured 2D, finish in high-def 3D. You'll need chests that change graphics on close-up maps, town maps and world map - that is, your close-up map might look 3D, but your world map might still be 2D.
> Close-up maps are A-RPG (first Zelda games, even when in 3D), world map is like the first Final Fantasies and contains random encounters (turn-based battle with filling gauge that dictates when your turn starts).
> Early on in the game, gain the ability to switch from new-school to old-school (3D/2D) by hitting crystals; you'll need this to solve some puzzles.
> The game is quite linear (you can't miss upgrade chests) but so are roller coasters.

Don't let the size fool you (101 MB after install); it takes 6 hours or so to complete at 100% (say the developers). Don't let the price get you down, where I live a new DVD is easily 25-30€ and it lasts three hours tops.

Only flaw I can see is: it's not really what I expected, and it's not really what you were expecting either. That's because the genre they chose (which I totally just made up) - an anthology and walk through a certain genre of video game - is very open and I think every one saw in the game what they wanted to see.

An excellent video game nonetheless.
Have to agree. It's a truly excellent game.

BTW, I'd caution people from trying to find out TOO MUCH about the game before they decide to pony up the price of 3 lattes or not.

The whole fun of the game is all the surprises, so you're destroying the experience for yourself if you find out about every little thing before buying, IMO.

BTW, I've played about 5 1/2 hours and would say I'm almost done. I did go the completionist route and made sure I got all the 'cards' and 'stars' etc. Incredibly fun, though. I've had a blast and well worth the 9 bucks, especially as I'll easily play it through one more time.
Wow...

The Cat Lady and Evoland are on my list to buy soon. Damnit so many games so little time.
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xyem: See this screenshot?

It's the same filesize (~90kb) as the game it is a screenshot of.
o.o that is pretty amazing.
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Pip-Boy: Hm, wouldn't it be cool playing games in a theater with all the professional equipment...
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P1na: Years ago, I used to play Wii games on the big university classrooms. Grab some friends, sneak into the class, put all tables against a corner, switch on the big screen projector, and play. It was awesome.

Does that count?
I think, it may count regarding the visual but not the audio experience.
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P1na: Years ago, I used to play Wii games on the big university classrooms. Grab some friends, sneak into the class, put all tables against a corner, switch on the big screen projector, and play. It was awesome.

Does that count?
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Pip-Boy: I think, it may count regarding the visual but not the audio experience.
I guess you're right. You can't be putting top audio settings on the loudspeakers when you're sneaking at the university, now can you?
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jamyskis: One thing that really pissed me off was the complete lack of gamepad support. I bought the game, attached my laptop to the TV, grabbed my gamepad, fired it up, lounged out on the sofa and...found that the game supports fucking keyboard only. Yeah, cheers for that. A genre famous for its console roots and being played from a gamepad, and yet no gamepad support in sight.

And the first couple of hours have been a bit bland to be honest. I got a giggle out of some of the gags in the unlock lines, but a JRPG without any kind of real story shows you how much the genre depends on stronger narratives.

This is panning out to be one of my biggest disappointments this year so far.
Can't you use joy2key or xpadder to map to a controller?
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jamyskis: One thing that really pissed me off was the complete lack of gamepad support. I bought the game, attached my laptop to the TV, grabbed my gamepad, fired it up, lounged out on the sofa and...found that the game supports fucking keyboard only. Yeah, cheers for that. A genre famous for its console roots and being played from a gamepad, and yet no gamepad support in sight.

And the first couple of hours have been a bit bland to be honest. I got a giggle out of some of the gags in the unlock lines, but a JRPG without any kind of real story shows you how much the genre depends on stronger narratives.

This is panning out to be one of my biggest disappointments this year so far.
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Hillsy_: Can't you use joy2key or xpadder to map to a controller?
Yes, but most games should have some sort of out of the box gamepad support - it's not done too much in the West, but it seems every single Japanese indie game I play has modern gamepad support that works with just about any controller.
Have played this for about 2 hours and must say I am very happy with the game myself. Brings back all sorts of memories.

I installed it onto my mothers computer too so she and my little brother could give it ago and watching my mother play was more fun then I expected, as she never really played early games. Yet my little brother though it was uninteresting because the graphics were too old for a new game.
Seems you really had to play them to get it... but if you like RPG, or just older games I am sure this will find somewhere in your heart to be loved.
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johnki: So anyone played it yet? Any opinions?
It is stuffed with clever references both to classic rpgs and more recent non-genre titles. The game itself is a little short for my taste - I played it trough in about four hours and if you simply follow the story without trying to get near 100% it will probably take you even less. But if you are willing to pay not only for gameplay and gaming-time but for the idea itself I certainly can recommend it.
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jamyskis: One thing that really pissed me off was the complete lack of gamepad support. I bought the game, attached my laptop to the TV, grabbed my gamepad, fired it up, lounged out on the sofa and...found that the game supports fucking keyboard only. Yeah, cheers for that. A genre famous for its console roots and being played from a gamepad, and yet no gamepad support in sight.

And the first couple of hours have been a bit bland to be honest. I got a giggle out of some of the gags in the unlock lines, but a JRPG without any kind of real story shows you how much the genre depends on stronger narratives.

This is panning out to be one of my biggest disappointments this year so far.
v1.1.2334: - added gamepad support (Windows only)