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I'll have to give this a try, played around with making profiles a bit and thought it was too much work, but didn't know about the profiling software, that should make it much easier. Does it allow for multiple mappings for the same command or button? and does it work with macros or is it just 1:1?
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BlueKronos: I'll have to give this a try, played around with making profiles a bit and thought it was too much work, but didn't know about the profiling software, that should make it much easier. Does it allow for multiple mappings for the same command or button? and does it work with macros or is it just 1:1?
You can do just about anything. Buttons can perform multiple functions, activate macros, act as on/off toggles (for games that require you to hold to run/crouch or whatever). You can also set up one or more "shift" functions that change some or all of the inputs (e.g. you might want a function that slows down mouse movement speed for easier interaction with the inventory and so forth). You can even assign rumble to particular functions (if your controller supports rumble).

Many popular games already have profiles available from other users so you could start with that and then adjust it to your liking instead of having to make the whole thing from scratch.

I personally prefer Xpadder but both have the same sort of features and can accomplish whatever you're wanting.
Post edited February 13, 2013 by Arkose
I agree with SirPrimalform posts, everything that was listed in the main post, Xpadder can also do, using only 5 MB of RAM. The way those features were posted looked like Xpadder wasn't able to do, or barely do, when in reality, Xpadder does them in a superb way.
Post edited February 13, 2013 by Azrael360
Are either Xpadder or Pinnacle able to split the z-axis (left and right triggers) yet? When I last tried it could only map the two triggers as a single z-axis as follows:

Left trigger pressed -> full negative z-axis input
Right trigger pressed -> full positive z-axis input
Both triggers pressed -> centred z-axis input
Both triggers released -> centred z-axis input

My main reason for wanting the axis split is for DirectInput racing games so that you can use full accelerator pedal and use the brakes at the same time. The shared z-axis just means that pressing the brake trigger whilst accelerator trigger is pressed just reduces the accelerator, it doesn't apply brakes as the resultant z-axis input is positive.
Cool application, you can change the deadzone which I noticed is at 23% for my new Thrust GXT-28. Question, what do you do if the program stops responding as soon as the calibration is done? Also, is it possible to reduce deadzone with Xpadder?