It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer or Opera

×
avatar
cw8: Has Josh mentioned how long the game will be? Hopefully as long as BG2 which means I'll take 2 months to complete it.
avatar
Nergal01: Not in terms of hours, but he said that PoE will have about 150 maps, compared to 80 in the first Icewind Dale, and 200 in Baldur's Gate 2. I.e. it apparently won't be as massive as BG 2, but almost double the size of IWD, which wasn't a short game to begin with.

I'd think that about 80 hours of gameplay should be in the cards.
Good, thanks! Means I'll clock around 100 hours easily.
avatar
Theoclymenus: The idea that D&D rules (2nd edition in particular) can be simplified without pretty much destroying the gameplay of those games which used them is usually based on the opinions of gamers who never took the trouble to understood the rules properly in the first place because they were either too lazy or found it too difficult to do so.
What can I say, there are role players and there are roll players. You obviously fall into the second camp. Some of us like the story aspect of the games a lot more. I understand the appeal of complex number rules for character generation (spent a lot of time just creating characters in Champions), but I disliked complex combat rules, I preferred simpler and more descriptive combat. (I haven't played P&P RPG for probably 20 years, but that's how I preferred things back then.)

PC RPG is of course less descriptive by nature than a good DM (though typically more than a bad DM), so combat is necessarily less descriptive and more number based, but I'd go any day for a less combat heavy RPG for this precise reason, that I care more about narrative.
avatar
Theoclymenus: The idea that D&D rules (2nd edition in particular) can be simplified without pretty much destroying the gameplay of those games which used them is usually based on the opinions of gamers who never took the trouble to understood the rules properly in the first place because they were either too lazy or found it too difficult to do so.
avatar
ET3D: What can I say, there are role players and there are roll players. You obviously fall into the second camp. Some of us like the story aspect of the games a lot more. I understand the appeal of complex number rules for character generation (spent a lot of time just creating characters in Champions), but I disliked complex combat rules, I preferred simpler and more descriptive combat. (I haven't played P&P RPG for probably 20 years, but that's how I preferred things back then.)

PC RPG is of course less descriptive by nature than a good DM (though typically more than a bad DM), so combat is necessarily less descriptive and more number based, but I'd go any day for a less combat heavy RPG for this precise reason, that I care more about narrative.
Well when you're talking about computer games numbers are all you've got, because the DM is the computer. In pen & paper roleplaying having systems which require a minimal amount of arithmetic are better because the game flow is more fluid. But when you've got a computer, well being able to make complex mathematical calculations on the fly is basically what they're made for. PnP generally tends to be a bit more theatrical because it's essentially a multiplayer game, the same standards don't apply to single-player cRPGs when literally everything has to be stat'ed and accounted for because you know computers don't have imaginations.
avatar
Crosmando: Well when you're talking about computer games numbers are all you've got, because the DM is the computer. In pen & paper roleplaying having systems which require a minimal amount of arithmetic are better because the game flow is more fluid. But when you've got a computer, well being able to make complex mathematical calculations on the fly is basically what they're made for. PnP generally tends to be a bit more theatrical because it's essentially a multiplayer game, the same standards don't apply to single-player cRPGs when literally everything has to be stat'ed and accounted for because you know computers don't have imaginations.
That's true, but it just means that if you want a CRPG as a storytelling experience, you better make the number aspect simpler, not more complex. Well, it can be complex behind the scenes, but showing that complexity to the player will not make the game better for this type of player, because it moves the emphasis away from the story.